List of friction hitch knots

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A friction hitch is a kind of knot used to attach one rope to another in a way that is easily adjusted. These knots are commonly used in climbing as part of single-rope technique, doubled-rope technique and as "ratchets" to capture progress on a moving rope, most typically in a mechanical advantage system such as a Z-drag. These hitches are a simple and cheap alternative to mechanical ascenders.

Contents

List of friction hitches

KnotDescriptionImage
Adjustable grip hitch A simple and useful friction hitch, which may easily be shifted up and down the rope while slack. Adjustable grip hitch knot.png
Autoblock (Machard or French Prusik)A friction hitch tied around a thicker rope that can slide while unloaded, but locks when loaded. Commonly used to back up belays. Similar to the Prusik only in function. French Prusik is equivalent to bi-directional Machard. AutoblockBagi.JPG
Bachmann hitch Bachmann knot.png
Blake's hitch A friction hitch commonly used by arborists and tree climbers as an ascending knot. Blake's hitch is known by some climbers as a Swicero (Suicero) knot or Verones knot. Blakes hitch knot retouched.png
Distel Hitch Distel hitch.jpeg
Ezelius' adjustable grip hitchA slip and grip knot that gives good grip and has a wide range of use. Functions well on a wide range of rope materials, including slippery types like polyamide (nylon) and high-modulus polyethylene (Dynema™). Attaching cord can be of same or smaller diameter.
Farrimond friction hitch A quick-release adjustable friction hitch for use on lines under tension. Farrimond hitch.jpg
Gripping sailor's hitch A secure, jam-proof hitch used to tie one rope to another, or a rope to a pole, boom, spar, etc., when the pull is lengthwise along the object. It is also known as Michoacan/Martin among friction knots used in climbing. Bobmcgrsailorsgrippinghitch.jpg
Icicle hitch A knot that is excellent for connecting to a post when weight is applied to an end running parallel to the post in a specific direction. Icicle hitch knot.jpg
Klemheist hitch A friction hitch tied around a thicker rope that can slide while unloaded, but locks when loaded. Similar to the Prusik. Klemheist knot is a full equivalent to uni-directional Machard. Klemheist.jpg
Knut hitch A friction hitch used for climbing a rope, not to be confused with the Knute hitch. [1] KnutBagi.JPG
Machard Tresse A mono-directional variant of the common Machard. Tresse, French for braided, indicates a final crossing turn, which increases the hitch's hold and ease of release.
Michoacan/Martin A friction hitch tied around a thicker rope that can slide while unloaded, but locks when loaded. [2] [3] Similar to the Prusik. Michoacan/Martin is a full equivalent to Gripping sailor's hitch Michoacan-Martin.JPG
Pile hitch The pile hitch is easier to tie than the icicle hitch, and can be tied in the bight without access to either end of the rope. Pile hitch.jpg
Prusik or PrussikA friction hitch or knot used to put a loop of cord around a rope, applied in climbing, canyoneering, mountaineering, caving, rope rescue, and by arborists. Prusik.jpg
Rolling hitch (Taut-line hitch) Stopperstek.jpg
Schwabisch hitch A friction hitch tied around a thicker rope that can slide while unloaded, but locks when loaded. Similar to the Prusik Schwabisch.JPG
Todd-Kramer hitch A friction hitch tied around a thicker rope that can slide while unloaded, but locks when loaded. Similar to the Prusik Todd-Kramer5.JPG
Valdotain Tresse Friction knot used to be fixed on a tautline (a taut-rope), also known as a "Valdostano". It is the single cord equivalent of the Machard Tresse (which uses a loop of cord) Valdotain-VT.JPG
Cooper's hitch Friction knot used primarily instead of the Valdotain Tresse to which it is similar in design and function.

See also

Related Research Articles

Knot Method of fastening or securing linear material

A knot is an intentional complication in cordage which may be practical or decorative, or both. Practical knots are classified by function, including hitches, bends, loop knots, and splices: a hitch fastens a rope to another object; a bend fastens two ends of a rope to each another; a loop knot is any knot creating a loop, and splice denotes any multi-strand knot, including bends and loops. A knot may also refer, in the strictest sense, to a stopper or knob at the end of a rope to keep that end from slipping through a grommet or eye. Knots have excited interest since ancient times for their practical uses, as well as their topological intricacy, studied in the area of mathematics known as knot theory.

Truckers hitch

The trucker's hitch is a compound knot commonly used for securing loads on trucks or trailers. This general arrangement, using loops and turns in the rope itself to form a crude block and tackle, has long been used to tension lines and is known by multiple names. Knot author Geoffrey Budworth claims the knot can be traced back to the days when carters and hawkers used horse-drawn conveyances to move their wares from place to place.

Taut-line hitch

The taut-line hitch is an adjustable loop knot for use on lines under tension. It is useful when the length of a line will need to be periodically adjusted in order to maintain tension. It is made by tying a rolling hitch around the standing part after passing around an anchor object. Tension is maintained by sliding the hitch to adjust the size of the loop, thus changing the effective length of the standing part without retying the knot.

Sailors hitch

The sailor's hitch is a type of knot, which is a secure, jam-proof hitch. It is a type of knot that is defined as a type of hitch knot. A hitch is a type of knot that has the ability to fit to the size and shape of an object that it is being tied to.

Klemheist knot

The klemheist knot or French Machard knot is a type of friction hitch that grips the rope when weight is applied, and is free to move when the weight is released. It is used similarly to a Prusik knot or the Bachmann knot to ascend or descend a climbing rope. One advantage is that webbing can be used as an alternative to cord. The Klemheist is easier to slide up than a Prusik. The klemheist is also a way to attach a snubber to the anchor rope of small boats, with the advantage that it is easy to undo.

Tree climbing

Tree climbing is a recreational or functional activity consisting of ascending and moving around in the crown of trees.

Abseiling Rope-controlled descent of a vertical surface

Abseiling, also known as rappelling from French rappeler, 'to recall' or 'to pull through'), is a controlled descent off a vertical drop, such as a rock face, using a rope.

Sheet bend

The sheet bend is a bend. It is practical for joining lines of different diameter or rigidity.

Icicle hitch

An icicle hitch is a knot that is excellent for connecting to a post when weight is applied to an end running parallel to the post in a specific direction. This type of hitch will hold its place even when holding a substantial load on a smooth surface. One can even suspend from a tapered post with this knot.

Munter hitch Adjustable knot used control friction in a belay system

The Munter hitch, also known as the Italian hitch or the Crossing Hitch, is a simple adjustable knot, commonly used by climbers, cavers, and rescuers to control friction in a life-lining or belay system. To climbers, this knot is also known as HMS, the abbreviation for the German term Halbmastwurfsicherung, meaning half clove hitch belay. This technique can be used with a special "pear-shaped" HMS locking carabiner, or any locking carabiner wide enough to take two turns of the rope. The Munter hitch is named after Werner Munter, a Swiss mountain guide who popularised its use in mountaineering.

Bachmann knot

The Bachmann hitch is a friction hitch, named after the austrian alpinist Franz Bachmann. It is useful when the friction hitch needs to be reset quickly/often or made to be self-tending as in crevasse and self-rescue.

Blakes hitch

The Blake's hitch is a friction hitch commonly used by arborists and tree climbers as an ascending knot. Unlike other common climbing hitches, which often use a loop of cord, the Blake's hitch is formed using the end of a rope. Although it is a stable knot, it is often backed up with a stopper knot, such as a figure-of-eight knot, for safety. It is used for both ascending and descending, and is preferred by many arborists over other hitches, such as the taut-line hitch, as it is less prone to binding.

Prusik

A Prusik is a friction hitch or knot used to attach a loop of cord around a rope, applied in climbing, canyoneering, mountaineering, caving, rope rescue, ziplining, and by arborists. The term Prusik is a name for both the loops of cord and the hitch, and the verb is "to prusik". More casually, the term is used for any friction hitch or device that can grab a rope. Due to the pronunciation, the word is often misspelled Prussik, Prussick, or Prussic.

International Guild of Knot Tyers Organization

The International Guild of Knot Tyers is a worldwide association for people with an interest in knots and knot tying.

Autoblock

An autoblock is a rope device used in climbing and caving for both rappelling (downward) and ascending (upward).

Gripping sailors hitch

The gripping sailor's hitch is a secure, jam-proof friction hitch used to tie one rope to another, or a rope to a pole, boom, spar, etc., when the pull is lengthwise along the object. It will even grip a tapered object, such as a marlin spike, in the direction of taper, similar to the Icicle hitch, but superior. It is much superior to the rolling hitch for that purpose. It is similar to the Michoacan-Martin friction knot used in climbing; The finishing wrap for Michoacan-Martin is in the opposite direction of the Gripping Sailors knot, both ends are then made to carry weight.

Snuggle hitch

The snuggle hitch is a modification of the clove hitch, and is stronger and more secure. Owen K. Nuttall of the International Guild of Knot Tyers came up with this unique hitch, and it was first documented in the Guild's Knotting Matters magazine issue of January, 1987. Generally, hitches are used to attach a line to another rope or spar, pole, etc., and are usually temporary. Thus, they should be relatively easy to untie.

Distel hitch

Distel hitch is a friction hitch knot used to attach a carabiner to a rope, allowing a climber to descend or ascend. The knot is similar to the prusik knot, however it grips the rope more consistently, making for increased climber control.

References

  1. national.sherrilltree.com/site/Climbing_Hitches.pdf
  2. "History of a Knot". International Guild of Knot Tyers Forum. International Guild of Knot Tyers. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
  3. "Climbing Friction Knots". ArboristSite.com. Johnson Management, Inc. Retrieved 25 December 2016.