Thornbury (Gloucestershire) railway station

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Thornbury
Branch Line
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Thornbury
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Grovesend Tunnel
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Tytherington Quarry
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Tytherington Tunnel
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Tytherington
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Iron Acton
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Frampton Cotterell
freight line
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Yate

Thornbury railway station served the town of Thornbury in Gloucestershire. The station was the terminus of a short 7.5-mile (12 km) branch from Yate on the Midland Railway's line between Bristol and Gloucester.

Gloucestershire County of England

Gloucestershire is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean.

Yate railway station Railway station near Bristol, England

Yate railway station serves the town of Yate in South Gloucestershire, in south west England. The station is located on the main Bristol to Birmingham line between Bristol Parkway and Cam & Dursley, and is operated by Great Western Railway.

Midland Railway British pre-grouping railway company (1844–1922)

The Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom from 1844 to 1922, when it became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. It had a large network of lines managed from its headquarters in Derby. It became the third-largest railway undertaking in the British Isles.

The station was designed by the Midland Railway company architect John Holloway Sanders. [1] It opened in 1872 with two trains in each direction a day, both connecting at Yate with trains on the mainline. Later trains appear to have run through to and from Bristol Temple Meads, though the service was never frequent. In 1910, there were four trains in each direction on week-days. [2]

John Holloway Sanders

John Holloway Sanders FRIBA was an architect based in England and chief architect of the Midland Railway until 1884.

Bristol Temple Meads railway station Major railway station for the city of Bristol, England

Bristol Temple Meads is the oldest and largest railway station in Bristol, England. It is an important transport hub for public transport in the city. In addition to the train services there are bus services to many parts of the city and surrounding districts, and a ferry to the city centre. Bristol's other major station, Bristol Parkway, is on the northern outskirts of the conurbation.

Thornbury station appears to have been badly affected by the rise of industrial development in the Patchway and Filton areas that were not accessible from the railway, but could be reached using cheaper road services to Patchway railway station and Great Western Railway trains from there.

Patchway town in South Gloucestershire, United Kindom

Patchway is a town in South Gloucestershire, England, situated 10 km (6.2 mi) north-north west of central Bristol. The town is a housing overflow for Bristol being contiguous to Bristol's urban area, and is often regarded as a large outer suburb. Nearby are the other Bristol satellite towns of Filton and Bradley Stoke. Patchway is twinned with Clermont l'Herault, France, and Gauting, Germany. It was established as a civil parish in 1953, becoming separate from the parish of nearby Almondsbury.

Filton town in South Gloucestershire, United Kindom

Filton is a suburban town and civil parish in South Gloucestershire, England, north of the City of Bristol and approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) from the city centre. The town centres upon Filton Church, which dates back to the 12th century and is a Grade II listed building.

Patchway railway station Railway station in Bristol, England

Patchway railway station is on the South Wales Main Line, serving the Bristol suburbs of Patchway and Stoke Gifford in South Gloucestershire, England. It is 6 miles (10 km) from Bristol Temple Meads. Its three letter station code is PWY. It is managed by Great Western Railway, who provide all train services at the station, mainly a train every hour in each direction between Cardiff Central and Taunton.

The station at Thornbury had a large double-roomed terminus building. The single platform was on the north side and there was a run-round loop. Sidings occupied the land opposite the platform, and there were goods facilities for handling livestock beyond the platforms towards the terminal buffers. The station had a basic wooden engine shed, turntable, goods shed, water tower [3] and a substantial station master's house. [4]

Thornbury station was an early casualty to rail closure, and passenger services ceased in 1944, though passengers to and from the US military hospital at Leyhill, now a prison, continued later. It remained open for goods traffic until 1966 and was used extensively in the construction of the first Severn road bridge and the Oldbury Power Station. Even after Thornbury closed, a section of the branch remained open for quarry traffic to Tytherington Quarry. At Thornbury, the station buildings were demolished and are now the site of a Tesco supermarket.

Severn Bridge Suspension bridge spanning the River Severn and River Wye in England and Wales

The Severn Bridge is a motorway suspension bridge operated by Highways England that spans the River Severn and River Wye between Aust, South Gloucestershire in England, and Chepstow, Monmouthshire in South East Wales, via Beachley, Gloucestershire, which is a peninsula between the two rivers. It is the original Severn road crossing between England and Wales, and took three-and-a-half years to construct at a cost of £8 million. It replaced the Aust Ferry.

Tytherington Quarry is a 0.9 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest near the village of Tytherington, South Gloucestershire, notified in 1989.

Tesco British multinational grocery and general merchandise retailer

Tesco plc trading as Tesco, is a British multinational groceries and general merchandise retailer with headquarters in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom. It is the third-largest retailer in the world measured by gross revenues and ninth-largest retailer in the world measured by revenues. It has shops in seven countries across Asia and Europe, and is the market leader of groceries in the UK, Ireland, Hungary and Thailand.

From the 1990s onwards various proposals have been made for reopening the line to Thornbury as part of a Bristol/South Gloucestershire suburban rail network, most recently in a consultation report produced by Halcrow Group in 2012, [5] as well as the November 2015 joint transport study report produced by The West of England Local Enterprise Partnership. [6]

Halcrow Group Limited was a multinational engineering consultancy company, based in the United Kingdom

In England, local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) are voluntary partnerships between local authorities and businesses set up in 2011 by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to help determine local economic priorities and lead economic growth and job creation within the local area. They carry out some of the functions previously carried out by the regional development agencies which were abolished in March 2012. In March 2017 Northamptonshire LEP merged with South East Midlands LEP under the name and aegis of the latter, so that to date there are now 38 local enterprise partnerships in operation. Further mergers may take place in the future.

Services

Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Tytherington
Line and station closed
  Yate to Thornbury Branch
Midland Railway
 Terminus

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Iron Acton railway station railway station in South Gloucestershire UK

Iron Acton station opened on 2 September 1872, with the start of services on the Midland Railway branch from Yate to Thornbury. The station was designed by the Midland Railway company architect John Holloway Sanders.

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Foss Cross railway station was on the Midland and South Western Junction Railway in Gloucestershire. The station opened on 1 August 1891 with the section of the line between Cirencester Watermoor and the junction at Andoversford with the Great Western Railway's Cheltenham Lansdown to Banbury line, which had opened in 1881.

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Tytherington railway station

Tytherington railway station served the village of Tytherington in South Gloucestershire. The station was on the Yate to Thornbury branch line that was opened by the Midland Railway in 1872. The station was designed by the Midland Railway company architect John Holloway Sanders.

Dursley railway station

Dursley railway station served the town of Dursley in Gloucestershire, England, and was the terminus of the short Dursley and Midland Junction Railway line which linked the town to the Midland Railway's Bristol to Gloucester line at Coaley Junction.

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Cam railway station served the village of Cam in Gloucestershire, England. The station was on the short Dursley and Midland Junction Railway line which linked the town of Dursley to the Midland Railway's Bristol to Gloucester line at Coaley Junction.

Thornbury branch line railway line from Yate to Thornbury in the West of England

The Thornbury branch line is a railway line from Yate to Thornbury in the West of England. From 1963 until mid 2013, it remained as a freight route, serving the quarry at Tytherington. It was designated 'Out of Use (temporary)' by Network Rail from 2013 until 2017, when it reopened to serve Tytherington quarry again. The 7.5-mile (12 km) branch of the Midland Railway line between Bristol and Gloucester opened on 2 September 1872, and started at Yate and finished at Thornbury, with stops at Iron Acton and Tytherington.

References

  1. "Notes by the Way" . Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald. British Newspaper Archive. 1 November 1884. Retrieved 12 July 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  2. Bradshaws April 1910 Railway Guide (April 1910, reprinted 1968 ed.). David & Charles, Newton Abbot. 1968. p. 607. ISBN   0-7153-4246-0.
  3. Railway Magazine December 1957 p. 868
  4. Mike Oakley (2003). Gloucestershire Railway Stations. Wimborne: Dovecote Press. pp. 134–135. ISBN   1-904349-24-2.
  5. "Final Report" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 March 2016.
  6. "West of England Joint Transport Study. Issues and options for consultation Key Principles Report" (PDF).

Coordinates: 51°36′18″N2°31′30″W / 51.6050°N 2.5249°W / 51.6050; -2.5249