1167

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1167 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1167
MCLXVII
Ab urbe condita 1920
Armenian calendar 616
ԹՎ ՈԺԶ
Assyrian calendar 5917
Balinese saka calendar 1088–1089
Bengali calendar 574
Berber calendar 2117
English Regnal year 13  Hen. 2   14  Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar 1711
Burmese calendar 529
Byzantine calendar 6675–6676
Chinese calendar 丙戌(Fire  Dog)
3863 or 3803
     to 
丁亥年 (Fire  Pig)
3864 or 3804
Coptic calendar 883–884
Discordian calendar 2333
Ethiopian calendar 1159–1160
Hebrew calendar 4927–4928
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1223–1224
 - Shaka Samvat 1088–1089
 - Kali Yuga 4267–4268
Holocene calendar 11167
Igbo calendar 167–168
Iranian calendar 545–546
Islamic calendar 562–563
Japanese calendar Nin'an 2
(仁安2年)
Javanese calendar 1074–1075
Julian calendar 1167
MCLXVII
Korean calendar 3500
Minguo calendar 745 before ROC
民前745年
Nanakshahi calendar −301
Seleucid era 1478/1479 AG
Thai solar calendar 1709–1710
Tibetan calendar 阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
1293 or 912 or 140
     to 
阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1294 or 913 or 141
Lombard standard bearer re-entering Milan, after the League's foundation. Bassorilievo di Porta Romana (1171 ca.)..PNG
Lombard standard bearer re-entering Milan, after the League's foundation.
Member cities of the Lombard League Member Cities of the Lombard Leagues.png
Member cities of the Lombard League

Year 1167 ( MCLXVII ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

By place

Europe

Egypt

  • March 18 Battle of Al-Babein: A second Zangid army (some 12,000 men) under General Shirkuh and his nephew Saladin marches towards Egypt, but is met by the combined Crusader-Fatimid forces led by King Amalric of Jerusalem. After skirmishing down the Nile, the Crusaders are defeated near Giza and forced to retreat to Cairo. [3]
  • May–June Saladin leads the defence of Alexandria against the Crusader-Fatimid forces. He takes command over the garrison (plus some 1,000 cavalry), and the army's sick and wounded. [4]
  • August 4 Amalric I accepts a peace treaty and enters at the head of the Crusader army Alexandria. Saladin and his troops are escorted out with full military honours, and retreats to Syria. [5]

Ireland

England

Asia

By topic

Religion

  • Absalon, Danish archbishop and statesman, leads the first synod at Lund. He is granted land around the city of "Havn" (modern-day Copenhagen) and fortifies the coastal defence against the Wends.

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 1160s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1160, and ended on December 31, 1169.

1099 Calendar year

Year 1099 (MXCIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1100s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1100, and ended on December 31, 1109.

The 1120s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1120, and ended on December 31, 1129.

1123 Calendar year

Year 1123 (MCXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

The 1140s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1140, and ended on December 31, 1149.

1147 Calendar year

Year 1147 (MCXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1152 Calendar year

Year 1152 (MCLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1110s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1110, and ended on December 31, 1119.

1125 Calendar year

Year 1125 (MCXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1110 Calendar year

Year 1110 (MCX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1101 Calendar year

Year 1101 (MCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. It was the 2nd year of the 1100s decade, and the 1st year of the 12th century.

1137 Calendar year

Year 1137 (MCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1138 Calendar year

Year 1138 (MCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1149 Calendar year

Year 1149 (MCXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1102 Calendar year

Year 1102 (MCII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1105 Calendar year

Year 1105 (MCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Third Crusade attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin

The Third Crusade (1189–1192) was an attempt by the leaders of the three most powerful states of Western Christianity to reconquer the Holy Land following the capture of Jerusalem by the Ayyubid sultan Saladin in 1187. It was partially successful, recapturing the important cities of Acre and Jaffa, and reversing most of Saladin's conquests, but it failed to recapture Jerusalem, which was the major aim of the Crusade and its religious focus.

Bohemond III of Antioch Prince of Antioch

Bohemond III of Antioch, also known as Bohemond the Child or the Stammerer, was Prince of Antioch from 1163 to 1201. He was the elder son of Constance of Antioch and her first husband, Raymond of Poitiers. Bohemond ascended to the throne after the Antiochene noblemen dethroned his mother with the assistance of Thoros II, Lord of Armenian Cilicia. He fell into captivity in the Battle of Harim in 1164, but the victorious Nur ad-Din, atabeg of Aleppo released him to avoid coming into conflict with the Byzantine Empire. Bohemond went to Constantinople to pay homage to Manuel I Komnenos, who persuaded him to install a Greek Orthodox Patriarch in Antioch. The Latin Patriarch of Antioch, Aimery of Limoges, placed Antioch under interdict. Bohemond restored Aimery only after the Greek patriarch died during an earthquake in 1170.

Crusade of 1197 Crusade

The Crusade of 1197, also known as the Crusade of Henry VI or the German Crusade was a crusade launched by the Hohenstaufen emperor Henry VI in response to the aborted attempt of his father, Emperor Frederick I, during the Third Crusade in 1189–90. Thus the military campaign is also known as the "Emperor's Crusade".

References

  1. Vigueur, Jean-Claude Maire (2010). L'autre Rome: Une histoire des Romains à l'époque communale (XIIe-XIVe siècle). Paris: Tallandier. p. 315. ISBN   978-2-84734-719-7.
  2. Andrew Roberts (2011). Great Commanders of the Medieval World (454–1582), pp. 135–136. ISBN   978-0-85738-589-5.
  3. Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 304–305. ISBN   978-0-241-29876-3.
  4. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Command 12 - Saladin, p. 11. ISBN   978-1-84908-317-1.
  5. Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 305. ISBN   978-0-241-29876-3.
  6. Sager, Peter (2005). Oxford and Cambridge: An Uncommon History. London: Thames & Hudson. p. 36. ISBN   0500512493.