2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

Last updated
2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan
Flag of Michigan.svg
  1998 November 7, 2000 (2000-11-07) 2002  

All 16 Michigan seats to the United States House of Representatives
 Majority partyMinority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election106
Seats won97
Seat changeDecrease2.svg1Increase2.svg1
Popular vote2,177,6181,786,980
Percentage53.51%43.91%
SwingIncrease2.svg4.30%Decrease2.svg4.27%

The 2000 congressional elections in Michigan was held on November 7, 2000 to determine who would represent the state of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives. Michigan had sixteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2000 [1]
PartyVotesPercentageSeats BeforeSeats After+/–
Democratic 2,177,61853.51%109-1
Republican 1,786,98043.91%67+1
Libertarian 48,1001.18%00-
Independent 23,0880.57%00-
U.S. Taxpayers 18,2720.45%00-
Green 15,6020.38%00-
Total4,069,660100.00%1616-

Related Research Articles

Marylands 4th congressional district U.S. House district for Maryland

Maryland's 4th congressional district comprises portions of Prince George's County and Anne Arundel County. The seat is represented by Anthony G. Brown, a Democrat.

Michigans 5th congressional district U.S. House district for Michigan

Michigan's 5th congressional district is a United States congressional district in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. The district is currently represented by Democrat Dan Kildee. His uncle, Dale Kildee, previously represented the district. It is currently a mostly industrial area, with Arenac County, Iosco County, and Tuscola County being the main exceptions. From 2003 to 2013 it encompassed much of the area south of Saginaw Bay. It consisted of all of Tuscola and Genesee counties and the southeast portion of Bay and the eastern portion of Saginaw counties in the eastern-central portion of the state during that time. The district was extended into the upper mitt for the 2012 redistricting and most of Tuscola County was cut out.

2008 United States House of Representatives election in Montana

The 2008 United States House of Representatives election in Montana took place on Tuesday, November 4, 2008. Voters selected a single representative for the At-large District, who ran on a statewide ballot. Incumbent Representative Denny Rehberg sought re-election; he was originally elected in 2000 with 52% of the vote. He was formerly a Billings area rancher, state legislator (1984–90) and Montana Lieutenant Governor (1991–97).

1980 United States Senate election in New York

The 1980 United States Senate election in New York was held on November 4, 1980. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Jacob Javits was defeated in the primary, and Republican Al D'Amato won the three-way election. It is speculated by some that Elizabeth Holtzman would have won the election had Javits not ran after his defeat in the Republican primary.

1980 United States Senate election in Florida

The 1980 United States Senate election in Florida took place on November 4, 1980 alongside other elections for President of the United States as well as to the United States Senate in other states and elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Richard Stone ran for re-election to a second term, but lost the Democratic primary election to Bill Gunter. Republican Paula Hawkins defeated Gunter in the general election.

2000 United States House of Representatives election in Montana

The 2000 United States House of Representatives election in Montana were held on November 7, 2000 to determine who will represent the state of Montana in the United States House of Representatives. Montana has one, at large district in the House, apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census, due to its low population. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2004 United States House of Representatives election in Montana

The 2004 United States House of Representatives election in Montana were held on November 2, 2004 to determine who will represent the state of Montana in the United States House of Representatives. Montana has one, at large district in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census, due to its low population. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1996 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

The 1996 congressional elections in Michigan was held on November 5, 1996 to determine who would represent the state of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives. Michigan had sixteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

The 2002 congressional elections in Michigan was held on November 5, 2002 to determine who would represent the state of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives. Michigan had fifteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census, causing it to lose a seat from the previous election when it had sixteen seats. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1992 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

The 1992 congressional elections in Michigan was held on November 3, 1992 to determine who would represent the state of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives. Michigan had eighteen seats in the House, but lost two after being re-apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census, resulting in the state having sixteen seats. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in New Hampshire

The 2002 congressional elections in New Hampshire were held on November 5, 2002 to determine who will represent the state of New Hampshire in the United States House of Representatives. It coincided with the state's senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 108th Congress from January 2003 until January 2005. New Hampshire has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census.

2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia 2000 House elections in Virginia

The 2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 7, 2000 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia has eleven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1976 United States Senate election in Michigan

The 1976 United States Senate election in Michigan took place on November 2, 1976. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Philip Hart decided to retire instead of seeking a fourth term. Republican turned Democrat Representative Donald Riegle won the open seat.

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia 2002 House elections in Virginia

The 2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 5, 2002 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia has eleven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia 2002 House elections in Virginia

The 2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 2, 2004 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia has eleven seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas

The 2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas were held on November 2, 2004 to determine who will represent the state of Kansas in the United States House of Representatives. Kansas has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in New Hampshire

The 2004 congressional elections in New Hampshire were held on November 2, 2004 to determine who will represent the state of New Hampshire in the United States House of Representatives. It coincided with the state's senatorial and gubernatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 109th Congress from January 2005 until January 2007. New Hampshire has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census.

2000 United States House of Representatives elections in New Hampshire

The 2000 congressional elections in New Hampshire were held on November 7, 2000 to determine who will represent the state of New Hampshire in the United States House of Representatives. It coincided with the state's gubernatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 107th Congress from January 2001 until January 2003. New Hampshire has two seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census.

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan

The 2004 congressional elections in Michigan was held on November 2, 2004 to determine who would represent the state of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives. Michigan had fifteen seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1964 United States Senate election in Michigan Political election

The 1964 United States Senate election in Michigan took place on November 3, 1964. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Philip Hart was re-elected to a second term in office over Republican Elly Peterson.

References

  1. "Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives".