Free climbing

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Free climbing is a form of rock climbing in which the climber may use climbing equipment such as ropes and other means of climbing protection, but only to protect against injury during falls and not to assist vertical or horizontal progress. [1] The climber ascends or traverses by using physical ability to move over the rock via handholds, footholds, and body smears. [2]

Contents

The term free climbing is used in contrast to aid climbing , in which specific aid climbing equipment (such as mechanical ascenders) is used to assist the climber in ascent. The term free climbing originally meant "free from direct aid". [3]

Free climbing more specifically may include:


[ citation needed ]

Common misunderstandings of the term

While clear in its contrast to aid climbing, the term free climbing is nonetheless prone to misunderstanding and misuse.[ citation needed ]

The three most common errors are:

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Glossary of climbing terms</span> List of definitions of terms and concepts related to rock climbing and mountaineering

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Rock-climbing equipment</span>

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Aid climbing</span> Style of climbing

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Alpine climbing</span>

Alpine climbing is a branch of climbing in which the primary aim is very often to reach the summit of a mountain. In order to do this high rock faces or pinnacles requiring several lengths of climbing rope must be ascended. Often mobile, intermediate climbing protection has to be used in addition to the pitons usually in place on the climbing routes.

References

  1. hiking, Stewart Green Stewart M. Green is a lifelong climber from Colorado who has written more than 20 books about; Green, rock climbing our editorial process Stewart. "What is Free Climbing? Definition of a Rock Climbing Word". LiveAbout. Retrieved 2020-05-22.
  2. Mountaineering The freedom of the hills (7th ed.). Seattle, Washington, USA: The Mountaineers Books. 2009. p. 209. ISBN   978-0-89886-828-9.
  3. Bachar, John; Boga, Steven (1996). Free Climbing With John Bachar. Stackpole Books. p. 1. ISBN   9780811725170.

Bibliography

Further reading