Tinsley, South Yorkshire

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Tinsley
St Lawrence, Tinsley.jpg
Church of St Lawrence
Sheffield outline map with UK.svg
Red pog.svg
Tinsley
Location within Sheffield
OS grid reference SK395907
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town SHEFFIELD
Postcode district S9
Dialling code 0114
Police South Yorkshire
Fire South Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
53°24′43″N1°24′14″W / 53.412°N 1.404°W / 53.412; -1.404 Coordinates: 53°24′43″N1°24′14″W / 53.412°N 1.404°W / 53.412; -1.404

Tinsley is a suburb of northeastern Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. The suburb falls within the Darnall ward of the City.

Sheffield City and metropolitan borough in England

Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield is 582,506 (mid-2018 est.) and it is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group. Sheffield is the third-largest English district by population. The metropolitan population of Sheffield is 1,569,000.

South Yorkshire County of England

South Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in England. It is the southernmost county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region and had a population of 1.34 million in 2011. It has an area of 1,552 square kilometres (599 sq mi) and consists of four metropolitan boroughs, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield. South Yorkshire was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972. Its largest settlement is Sheffield.

Darnall suburb of Sheffield, England

Darnall is a suburb of eastern Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Darnall is approximately 3 miles (5 km) east-north-east of Sheffield city centre.

Contents

The name "Tinsley" is also associated with the nearby former Tinsley Marshalling Yard and the Tinsley Viaduct, which carries the M1 motorway across the Don Valley, as well as the former Tinsley Towers.

Tinsley Marshalling Yard

Tinsley Marshalling Yard was a railway marshalling yard, used to separate railway wagons, located near Tinsley in Sheffield, England. It was opened in 1965 as a part of a major plan to rationalise all aspects of the rail services in the Sheffield area, and closed in stages from 1985 with the run-down of rail freight in Britain. It was also the site of Tinsley Traction Maintenance Depot (TMD), which was closed in 1998. At its peak, 200 locomotives were allocated to this depot.

Tinsley Viaduct bridge in United Kingdom

Tinsley Viaduct is a two-tier road bridge in Sheffield, England; the first of its kind in the United Kingdom. It carries the M1 and the A631 3,389 feet (1,033 m) over the Don Valley, from Tinsley to Wincobank, also crossing the Sheffield Canal, the Midland Main Line and the former South Yorkshire Railway line from Tinsley Junction to Rotherham Central. The Supertram route to Meadowhall runs below part of the viaduct on the trackbed of the South Yorkshire Railway line to Barnsley.

M1 motorway motorway in central England connecting London and Leeds

The M1 motorway connects London to Leeds, where it joins the A1(M) near Aberford, to connect to Newcastle. It was the first inter-urban motorway to be completed in the UK; the first motorway in the country was the Preston By-pass, which later became part of the M6.

History

The name of the suburb derives from the Old English Tingas-Leah, which means 'Field of Council', cognate with "thing (assembly)" and "lea", a dialectal word for "meadow". It is mentioned as 'Tirneslawe' or 'Tineslawe' in the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was in the possession of Roger de Busli.

Thing (assembly) type of governing assembly

A thing was a governing assembly in early Germanic society, made up of the free people of the community presided over by lawspeakers. The word appears in Old Norse, Old English, and modern Icelandic as þing, in Middle English, Old Saxon, Old Dutch, and Old Frisian as thing, in German as Ding, and in modern Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Faroese, Gutnish, and Norn as ting, all from a reconstructed Proto-Germanic neuter *þingą; the word is the same as the more common English word thing, both having at their heart the basic meaning of "an assemblage, a coming together of parts"—in the one case, an "assembly" or "meeting", in the other, an "entity", "object", or "thing". The meeting-place of a thing was called a "thingstead" or "thingstow".

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

Roger de Busli was a Norman baron who participated in the conquest of England in 1066.

The chapel of St Lawrence, Tinsley was built in 1877 on the site of an ancient (possibly of Anglo-Saxon origin) chapel. [1] An annual royal payment was received until 1847 in order that a service for the dead could be held. [2]

Anglo-Saxons Germanic tribes who started to inhabit parts of Great Britain from the 5th century onwards

The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language; the cultural foundations laid by the Anglo-Saxons are the foundation of the modern English legal system and of many aspects of English society; the modern English language owes over half its words – including the most common words of everyday speech – to the language of the Anglo-Saxons. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest. The early Anglo-Saxon period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language. Charters and law were also established. The term Anglo-Saxon is popularly used for the language that was spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons in England and eastern Scotland between at least the mid-5th century and the mid-12th century. In scholarly use, it is more commonly called Old English.

Another tradition associated with the settlement required the Lord of the Manor of Tinsley to take a pair of white gloves to the Lord of Tickhill each year at Michaelmas, and receive in return a white dove to keep over winter. [2]

Glove Covering worn on the hand

A glove is a garment covering the whole hand. Gloves usually have separate sheaths or openings for each finger and the thumb.

Tickhill town in Tickhill, United Kindom

Tickhill is a town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, on the border with Nottinghamshire. It has a population of 5,301, reducing to 5,228 at the 2011 Census.

Michaelmas Christian festival

Michaelmas is a Christian festival observed in some Western liturgical calendars on 29 September. In some denominations a reference to a fourth angel, usually Uriel, is also added. Michaelmas has been one of the four quarter days of the financial year. The Serbian Orthodox Church observes the feast, whereas most Eastern Orthodox Churches do not. The Greek and Romanian Orthodox honour the archangels on 8 November instead, honouring the Cherubim and Seraphim also.

Tinsley Wood lay to the south of the settlement, on land now partly occupied by Sheffield City Airport and High Hazels Park. It may have been the site of the Battle of Brunanburh in 937, where Athelstan of Wessex gained the submission of the Celtic monarchs of Norse-Ireland & around Britain. [2] In the mediaeval period, it was associated with outlaws, one named as "Roger de Presteman, an outlawe of Tyneslawe". [3]

Sheffield City Airport

Sheffield City Airport was a small airport in Sheffield; it is now closed. It was in the Tinsley Park area of the city, near the M1 motorway and Sheffield Parkway, and opened in 1997. The airport's CAA licence was withdrawn on 21 April 2008 and it was officially closed on 30 April 2008, and the site is now part of the Advanced Manufacturing Park with various manufacturing businesses.

High Hazels Park

High Hazels Park is a 20-hectare parkland area in Darnall, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. Since the 19th century, Darnall has been a centre of the coal and steel industry in Sheffield. High Hazels House, located in the park, was built in 1850 by William Jeffcock. In 1894, Sheffield City Council bought the land and house from the Duke of Norfolk and Messers Jeffcock for £10,875. In 1895, the land was first used as a public recreation ground and was classed as one of the finest parks within the city of Sheffield. The park used to be home to a boating lake, which has since been filled in.

The Battle of Brunanburh was fought in 937 between Æthelstan, King of England, and an alliance of Olaf Guthfrithson, King of Dublin; Constantine II, King of Scotland and Owain, King of Strathclyde. One of the historiographical cruxes of this battle is the fact that it is often cited as the point of origin for English nationalism. Additionally, historians such as Michael Livingston argue that "the men who fought and died on that field forged a political map of the future that remains [in modernity], arguably making the Battle of Brunanburh one of the most significant battles in the long history not just of England, but of the whole of the British Isles."

The area became industrialised from 1732, when the River Don Navigation was extended to terminate in the village. A turnpike road was constructed to Sheffield. In 1819, the Sheffield Canal was opened, running from Tinsley to Sheffield. The area became major industrial centre known for its collieries, iron, steel, and wire works. [3]

Companies such as George Cohen, the '600 works', Osbourn Hadfield and Brinsworth Strip Mills were occupants of the landscape near Tinsley and the neighbouring district of Templeborough. Only the BOC plant[ clarification needed ] and Brinsworth Strip Mills remain within the village boundaries. All the remaining works were either demolished or preserved as a museum to what was the heart of Sheffield industry until 1985.

Facilities and attractions

Replacing the steelworks on Vulcan Road is the Meadowhall shopping centre.

In the centre of Tinsley is the Tinsley Recreation ground (sometimes referred to as "the Rec"). Recently,[ when? ] part of this has been claimed as a community centre called Tinsley Green. It has a new 5-aside football pitch, Tennis court, children's playground, adult rides and a cricket bowling practice area.

From 1997 to 2008 the area was home to the Sheffield City Airport, a small airport which offered mostly business-orientated flights to domestic locations in the UK and select cities in Western Europe. The airport closed to commercial traffic amidst controversy in 2002 and permanently in 2008 when its CAA Licence was withdrawn. The site remains mostly derelict despite plans having been approved for the construction of a business park on the old runway, and rumours of bids and petitions to re-open the airport regularly circulate.

The area around the old airport site and Shepcote Lane area houses several industrial units and modern business complexes.

Related Research Articles

Attercliffe suburb of Sheffield, England

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Ecclesall Electoral ward of Sheffield City Council

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Darnall (ward) electoral ward of Sheffield City Council

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Farnley, Leeds area of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

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Ecclesfield village and civil parish in the City of Sheffield district of South Yorkshire, England

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Treeton farm village in the United Kingdom

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Wadsley suburb if Sheffield, England

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Loxley, South Yorkshire village in the United Kingdom

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Oughtibridge village in South Yorkshire, UK

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Rotherham town in South Yorkshire, England

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Neepsend human settlement in United Kingdom

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Tong, West Yorkshire village in United Kingdom

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Ughill human settlement in the United Kingdom

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Fulwood, Sheffield residential suburb of the City of Sheffield

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References

  1. Wood, Michael (2001). Tinsley Wood. In Search of England: Journeys into the English past, pp. 203221. Penguin Books Ltd (University of California Press in the United States). ISBN   0-520-23218-6
  2. 1 2 3 Tinsley Park Wood
  3. 1 2 J. Edward Vickers, "The Ancient Suburbs of Sheffield", pp.1112 (1971)