Canada women's national soccer team

Last updated

Canada
Canadian Soccer Association logo.svg
Association Canadian Soccer Association
Confederation CONCACAF (North America, Central America and the Caribbean)
Head coach Kenneth Heiner-Møller
Captain Christine Sinclair
Most caps Christine Sinclair (278)
Top scorerChristine Sinclair (179)
FIFA code CAN
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First colours
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 5 Steady2.svg(December 7, 2018) [1]
Highest4 (August–December 2016, June 2017, March 2018)
Lowest13 (December 2005)
First international
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2–0 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(Blaine, United States; July 7, 1986)
Biggest win
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 21–0 Puerto Rico  Flag of Puerto Rico.svg
(Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada; August 28, 1998)
Biggest defeat
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9–1 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(Dallas, United States; May 19, 1995)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9–1 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(Sydney, Australia; June 2, 2000)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 9–1 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(Honefoss, Norway; June 19, 2001)
World Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1995 )
Best result4th place (2003)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1991 )
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Winners: 2 (1998, 2010)
Olympics
Appearances3 (first in 2008 )
Best result Bronze medal.svg Bronze: 2 (2012, 2016)

The Canada women's national soccer team (French : Équipe du Canada féminine de soccer) is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Canadian Soccer Association association football national governing body

The Canadian Soccer Association is the governing body of soccer in Canada. It is a national organization that oversees the Canadian men's and women's national teams for international play, as well as the respective junior sides. Within Canada, it oversees national professional and amateur club championships.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is the continental governing body for association football in North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Three geographically South American entities — the independent nations of Guyana and Suriname and the French overseas department of French Guiana — are also members. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

Contents

The team reached international prominence at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing in the third place match to the United States. [2] Canada qualified for its first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 2008, making it to the quarterfinals. [3] Canada are two-time CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions, and two-time Olympic bronze medalists from London 2012 where they defeated France 1–0 in Coventry and from Rio de Janeiro 2016, after defeating hosts Brazil 2–1 in São Paulo. [4]

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup. The men's team had won the World Cup three times at the time.

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cups, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Association football has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program in 1996.

A certain segment of the Canadian women's soccer fans are closely linked to the U-20 team (U-19 prior to 2006), partly due to Canada hosting the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in 2002, a tournament in which the team won silver in front of 47,784 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta. [5] Canada also hosted the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they were eliminated in the quarterfinals by England. Canada set the tournament and team record for attendance in the process, with 1,353,506 and 54,027 respectively. [6]

Canada womens national under-20 soccer team national association football team

The Canada U-20 women's national soccer team is a youth soccer team operated under the Canadian Soccer Association. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the full women's national team. Their most recent major competition was the 2018 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship.

The FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament, organized by FIFA, for national teams of women under the age of 20. The tournament is held in even-numbered years. It was first conducted in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship with an upper age limit of 19. In 2006, the age limit was raised to the current 20. The event was renamed as a World Cup effective with the 2008 competition, making its name consistent with FIFA's other worldwide competitions for national teams.

2002 FIFA U-19 Womens World Championship

The 2002 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 17 August to 1 September. It was the first sanctioned youth tournament for women put together by FIFA. The tournament was hosted by Canada. FIFA granted the tournament to Canada in March 2001. Three cities hosted the tournament, Edmonton, Vancouver, and Victoria. Canada's Christine Sinclair was the Adidas Golden Ball recipient, as tournament MVP, and the Golden Shoe winner.

History

The Canada women's team played its first international in 1986, a 2–0 away loss to the United States. [7] [8] The team's first major tournament was the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden, where the team achieved one draw and two losses in group play and failed to advance. [9] Its first success in a major tournament was the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup in the United States, where Canada finished in fourth place, their first time reaching the semifinals of a major global tournament. [10] Canada's best finish in any major global tournament was its third-place finish at both the 2012 and 2016 Summer Olympics. [11] Canada hosted the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, where they reached the quarterfinals. [12]

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

Captain Christine Sinclair has been called the "backbone" of the Canadian national team, earning her 250th cap in 2016, while ranking second worldwide in international goals scored by any player, man or woman. [13] [14] [15] She was named Canada Soccer's female player of the year every year from 2004 to 2014, and has been nominated for FIFA's Women's World Player of the Year. [16] Despite speculation otherwise, she confirmed in 2016 that she plans to compete in the 2019 Women's World Cup and the 2020 Olympics. [13] She also added prior to the 2016 Olympics that "The young players coming into this Olympic squad have brought an energy and passion to our team and they have risen the bar." [17]

Christine Sinclair Canadian association football player

Christine Margaret Sinclair, OC is a Canadian soccer player and captain of the Canadian national team. She plays professionally for the Portland Thorns FC in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) and previously played for FC Gold Pride and Western New York Flash in the Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). A CONCACAF champion, two-time Olympic bronze medalist and 14-time winner of the Canada Soccer Player of the Year award, Sinclair is Canada's all-time leading scorer and currently second in all-time international goals scored for males or females with 179, behind Abby Wambach at 184.

Cap (sport) sports game

In sport, a cap is a metaphorical term for a player's appearance in a game at international level. The term dates from the practice in the United Kingdom of awarding a cap to every player in an international match of association football. In the early days of football, the concept of each team wearing a set of matching shirts had not been universally adopted, so each side would distinguish itself from the other by wearing a specific sort of cap.

2019 FIFA Womens World Cup 2019 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup will be the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by the women's national teams of the member associations of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) between 7 June and 7 July 2019. In March 2015, France won the right to host the event; the first time the country will host the tournament, and the third time a European nation will. Matches are planned for nine cities across France. The United States enters the competition as defending champions. It will also be the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

Record

World Cup

YearResultRankMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did not qualify
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Group stage10/123012513
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Group stage12/163012312
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Fourth place4/1663031010
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Group stage9/16311174
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Group stage16/16300317
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Quarterfinals6/24522143
Flag of France.svg 2019 Qualified
Total7/82365123049

Olympic Games

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Did not qualify
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000
Flag of Greece.svg 2004
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Eighth place411256
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Third Place6312128
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016 Third Place6501105
Total3/6169252719

CONCACAF Championship

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
Flag of Haiti.svg 1991 Runners-up5401235
Flag of the United States.svg 1993 -311141
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1994 Runners-up4301186
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1998 Champions5500420
Flag of the United States.svg 2000 Fourth place52032012
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of the United States.svg 2002 Runners-up5401263
Flag of the United States.svg 2006 Runners-up210152
Flag of Mexico.svg 2010 Champions5500170
Flag of the United States.svg 2014 Did not participate
Flag of the United States.svg 2018 Runners-up5401243
Total9/1039291917932

Pan American Games

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1999 Fourth place6321169
Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg 2003 Runners-up4202810
Flag of Brazil.svg 2007 Third Place64022511
Flag of Mexico.svg 2011 Champions532073
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Fourth place510469
Flag of Peru.svg 2019 Not yet qualified
Total5/52613496242

Minor tournaments

Recent schedule and results

2018

2019

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the roster for the 2019 Algarve Cup. [18]

Caps and goals are current as of March 6, 2019, after the match against Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Stephanie Labbé (1986-10-10) October 10, 1986 (age 32)580 Flag of the United States.svg North Carolina Courage
181 GK Erin McLeod (1983-02-26) February 26, 1983 (age 36)1170 Flag of Sweden.svg Växjö
211 GK Kailen Sheridan (1995-07-16) July 16, 1995 (age 23)70 Flag of the United States.svg Sky Blue FC

22 DF Allysha Chapman (1989-01-25) January 25, 1989 (age 30)601 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash
32 DF Kadeisha Buchanan (1995-11-05) November 5, 1995 (age 23)853 Flag of France.svg Lyon
42 DF Shelina Zadorsky (1992-08-24) August 24, 1992 (age 26)481 Flag of the United States.svg Orlando Pride
102 DF Ashley Lawrence (1995-06-11) June 11, 1995 (age 23)725 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain
202 DF Shannon Woeller (1990-01-31) January 31, 1990 (age 29)200 Flag of Sweden.svg Eskilstuna United
222 DF Lindsay Agnew (1995-03-31) March 31, 1995 (age 23)110 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash
242 DF Jenna Hellstrom (1995-04-02) April 2, 1995 (age 23)30 Flag of Sweden.svg KIF Örebro

53 MF Rebecca Quinn (1995-08-11) August 11, 1995 (age 23)465 Flag of France.svg Paris FC
73 MF Julia Grosso (2000-08-29) August 29, 2000 (age 18)130 Flag of the United States.svg Texas Longhorns
83 MF Diana Matheson (1984-04-06) April 6, 1984 (age 34)20318 Flag of the United States.svg Utah Royals FC
113 MF Desiree Scott (1987-07-31) July 31, 1987 (age 31)1390 Flag of the United States.svg Utah Royals FC
133 MF Sophie Schmidt (1988-06-28) June 28, 1988 (age 30)18018unattached
143 MF Gabrielle Carle (1998-10-12) October 12, 1998 (age 20)121 Flag of the United States.svg Florida State Seminoles
173 MF Jessie Fleming (1998-03-11) March 11, 1998 (age 21)617 Flag of the United States.svg UCLA Bruins

64 FW Deanne Rose (1999-03-03) March 3, 1999 (age 20)378 Flag of the United States.svg Florida Gators
94 FW Jordyn Huitema (2001-05-08) May 8, 2001 (age 17)186 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Vancouver Whitecaps FC Girls Elite
124 FW Christine Sinclair (captain) (1983-06-12) June 12, 1983 (age 35)278179 Flag of the United States.svg Portland Thorns FC
154 FW Nichelle Prince (1995-02-19) February 19, 1995 (age 24)4610 Flag of the United States.svg Houston Dash
164 FW Janine Beckie (1994-08-20) August 20, 1994 (age 24)5224 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
194 FW Adriana Leon (1992-10-02) October 2, 1992 (age 26)5514 Flag of England.svg West Ham United

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last twelve months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Sabrina D'Angelo (1993-05-11) May 11, 1993 (age 25)50 Flag of Sweden.svg Vittsjö vs. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, January 22, 2019
GK Rylee Foster (1998-08-13) August 13, 1998 (age 20)00 Flag of the United States.svg West Virginia Mountaineers 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO

DF Vanessa Gilles (1996-03-11) March 11, 1996 (age 23)00 Flag of France.svg Bordeaux vs. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, January 22, 2019
DF Jayde Riviere (2001-01-22) January 22, 2001 (age 18)10 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg REX Ontariovs. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, January 22, 2019
DF Emma Regan (2000-01-28) January 28, 2000 (age 19)10 Flag of the United States.svg Texas Longhorns 2018 CONCACAF Championship
DF Maya Antoine (2001-08-08) August 8, 2001 (age 17)00 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg REX Ontario 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
DF Kennedy Faulknor (1999-06-30) June 30, 1999 (age 19)40 Flag of the United States.svg UCLA Bruins 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO

MF Amandine Pierre-Louis (1995-02-18) February 18, 1995 (age 24)00 Flag of the United States.svg Sky Blue FC 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
MF Jade Rose (2003-02-12) February 12, 2003 (age 16)00 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg REX Ontario 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
MF Sarah Stratigakis (1999-03-07) March 7, 1999 (age 20)20 Flag of the United States.svg Michigan Wolverines 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
MF Danica Wu (1992-08-13) August 13, 1992 (age 26)20 Flag of Germany.svg SGS Essen 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO

FW Maegan Kelly (1992-02-19) February 19, 1992 (age 27)50unattached 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO
FW Kaila Novak (2002-03-24) March 24, 2002 (age 16)00 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg FC London 2018 CONCACAF Championship PRO

Notes:

  • PRE = Preliminary squad
  • PRO = Provisional roster

Coaching staff

PositionStaff
Head Coach Flag of Denmark.svg Kenneth Heiner-Møller
Assistant Coach Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Bev Priestman

Last updated: January 8, 2018
Source:

Former head coaches

  • Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Neil Turnbull, 1986–1991 and 1996–1999 (including one FIFA Women's World Cup)
  • Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Sylvie Béliveau, 1993–1995 (including one FIFA Women's World Cup)
  • Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Ian Bridge, two matches in 2007 (with Even Pellerud at one FIFA Women's World Cup)
  • Flag of Norway.svg Even Pellerud, 2000–2008 (including two FIFA Women's World Cups)
  • Flag of Italy.svg Carolina Morace, 2009–2011 (including one FIFA Women's World Cup)
  • Flag of England.svg John Herdman, 2011–2018 (including one FIFA Women's World Cup)

Player records

Bold players are still active

All-time record against other nations

As of March 6, 2019

See also

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References

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  2. "Canadian soccer timeline from 2001 to 2004". Canada Soccer. May 27, 2012. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  3. "Canadian soccer timeline from 2005 to 2008". Canada Soccer. May 27, 2012. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  4. FIFA.com. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament, Rio 2016 - Matches - FIFA". FIFA. Retrieved February 26, 2017.
  5. FIFA.com. "FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship Canada 2002 - Matches - Canada-USA - FIFA". FIFA. Retrieved February 26, 2017.
  6. "Key figures from the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015". FIFA . Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  7. Larsen, Karin (June 6, 2015). "FIFA Women's World Cup brings back bittersweet memories for Canada's 1st national female soccer players". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  8. Lisi, Clemente A. (2010). "The U.S. Women's Soccer Team: An American Success Story". Scarecrow Press. p. 131. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  9. FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995 - Matches - FIFA". FIFA. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  10. FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003 - Matches - FIFA". FIFA. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  11. "Canadian women repeat as Olympic soccer bronze medallists". Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  12. "Canada gets 2015 Women's World Cup of soccer". cbc.ca. March 3, 2011.
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  14. "Christine Sinclair gets heartfelt praise from Canadian soccer boss". Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
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  18. Molinaro, John (February 15, 2019). "Christine Sinclair highlights Canada's roster for Algarve Cup". Sportsnet.ca. Sportsnet. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
1994 United States  Flag of the United States.svg
CONCACAF Champions
1998 (First title)
Succeeded by
2002 United States  Flag of the United States.svg
Preceded by
2006 United States  Flag of the United States.svg
CONCACAF Champions
2010 (Second title)
Succeeded by
2014 United States  Flag of the United States.svg