New York State Department of Transportation

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New York State Department of Transportation
NYSDOT LOGO.png
NYSDOT headquarters.jpg
The headquarters of the NYSDOT in Colonie
Department overview
Formed1967 (1967)
Preceding agencies
Jurisdiction New York State
Headquarters50 Wolf Road
Colonie, New York
42°42′49″N73°58′47″W / 42.71361°N 73.97972°W / 42.71361; -73.97972 Coordinates: 42°42′49″N73°58′47″W / 42.71361°N 73.97972°W / 42.71361; -73.97972
Employees8,300
Annual budget$10.1 billion [1]
Department executive
  • Marie Therese Dominguez, Commissioner
Key document
Website www.dot.ny.gov

The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) is the department of the New York state government [2] responsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of New York.

Contents

This transportation network includes:

Its regulations are compiled in title 17 of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations .

History

The history of the New York State Department of Transportation and its predecessors spans over two centuries:

The first head of the New York State Department of Transportation (effective from 1 September 1967) was the former head of the New York State Department of Public Works John Burch McMorran (1899–1991). [3] The first Executive Deputy Commissioner of the New York State Department of Transportation was Edward Burton Hughes, who had formerly been Deputy Superintendent of the New York State Department of Public Works, a role he had worked in continuously since 1952. [4] Both appointments were engaged by Governor Nelson Rockefeller.

Organization

NYSDOT regions map.svg

The department comprises 11 regional offices and 68 county transportation maintenance residencies. Tioga County was moved to adjacent region in August 2007, Wayne County was moved from Region 3 to Region 4 in the late 1990s.

NYSDOT regions and the counties they serve are: [5]

RegionMain officeCounties served
1 (Capital District) Colonie Albany, Essex, Greene, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Warren, Washington
2 (Mohawk Valley) Utica Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida
3 (Central New York) Syracuse Cayuga, Cortland, Onondaga, Oswego, Seneca, Tompkins
4 (Genesee Valley) Rochester Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Wayne, Wyoming
5 (Western New York) Buffalo Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Niagara
6 (Central Southern Tier) Hornell Allegany, Chemung, Schuyler, Steuben, Tioga, Yates
7 (North Country) Watertown Clinton, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis, St. Lawrence
8 (Hudson Valley) Poughkeepsie Columbia, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Ulster, Westchester
9 (Southern Tier) Binghamton Broome, Chenango, Delaware, Otsego, Schoharie, Sullivan
10 (Long Island) Hauppauge Nassau, Suffolk
11 (New York City) Long Island City Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, Richmond

Traffic Management

NYS DOT has several Traffic Management Centers (TMC) located throughout the 11 regions in New York State.

Region 1 is also the home to the NYS DOT STICC (Statewide Transportation Information Coordination Center), manned 24/7, STICC is responsible for the coordination & logistics of statewide resources during major incidents within New York State and is currently located on the 1st floor of the DOT Headquarters in Colonie, NY.

See also

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References

  1. "Overview". Spending by Agency. New York State Division of the Budget. January 13, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2017.
  2. Transportation Law § 11. "There shall be in the state government a department of transportation. The head of the department shall be the commissioner of transportation, [...]"
  3. Lee A. Daniels (reporter) (October 9, 1991). "J. Burch McMorran Is Dead at 92. Built Many Public Works Projects". New York Times . Retrieved 2011-11-14. J. Burch McMorran, a career civil servant who helped design and build some of the most important public works projects in New York State, died on Sunday at Eddy Memorial Geriatric Center in Troy, N.Y. He was 92 years old and lived in Troy. ...
  4. Massena, New York, Observer, page 7, 12 September 1967 – J. Burch McMorran Named Head of New Transportation Department by Governor Nelson Rockefeller. He also announces the appointment of E. Burton Hughes as Executive Deputy Commissioner (article) (retrieved 27 January 2018):http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn84031311/1967-09-12/ed-1/seq-7/
  5. "Regional Offices". State of New York . Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  6. "Region 1 TMC Design". M&J Engineering P.C.