Reventador

Last updated
Reventador
ElReventador2012.jpg
Cone of Reventador in 2012 (V. Scherrer)
Highest point
Elevation 3,562 m (11,686 ft) [1]
Prominence 1,086 m (3,563 ft)
Coordinates 0°4′39″S77°39′21″W / 0.07750°S 77.65583°W / -0.07750; -77.65583 Coordinates: 0°4′39″S77°39′21″W / 0.07750°S 77.65583°W / -0.07750; -77.65583 [1]
Naming
English translationExploder
Language of name Spanish
Geography
Equador physical map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Reventador
Parent range Andes
Geology
Mountain type Stratovolcano (active)
Volcanic arc/belt North Volcanic Zone
Last eruption 2008 to 2018 (ongoing) [2]

Reventador is an active stratovolcano which lies in the eastern Andes of Ecuador. It lies in a remote area of the national park of the same name, which is Spanish for "exploder". Since 1541 it has erupted over 25 times, although its isolated location means that many of its eruptions have gone unreported. Its most recent eruption began in 2008 [3] and is ongoing as of July 4,2017. [4] The largest historical eruption occurred in 2002. [3] During that eruption the plume from the volcano reached a height of 17 km and pyroclastic flows went up to 7 km from the cone.

Stratovolcano Tall, conical volcano built up by many layers of hardened lava and other ejecta

A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano, is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava, tephra, pumice and ash. Unlike shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile with a summit crater and periodic intervals of explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions, although some have collapsed summit craters called calderas. The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far, due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica, with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi).

Andes Mountain range in South America

The Andes or Andean Mountains are the longest continental mountain range in the world, forming a continuous highland along the western edge of South America. The Andes also have the 2nd most elevated highest peak of any mountain range, only behind the Himalayas. The range is 7,000 km (4,300 mi) long, 200 to 700 km wide, and has an average height of about 4,000 m (13,000 ft). The Andes extend from north to south through seven South American countries: Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile and Argentina.

Ecuador Republic in South America

Ecuador, officially the Republic of Ecuador, is a country in northwestern South America, bordered by Colombia on the north, Peru on the east and south, and the Pacific Ocean on the west. Ecuador also includes the Galápagos Islands in the Pacific, about 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) west of the mainland. The capital city is Quito, which is also the largest city since 2018.

Contents

On March 30, 2007, the mountain ejected ash again. The ash reached a height of about two miles (3 km, 11,000 ft). No injuries or damages were reported.

The volcano's main peak lies inside a U-shaped caldera which is open towards the Amazon basin to the east. Its lavas are andesitic.

A caldera is a large cauldron-like hollow that forms shortly after the emptying of a magma chamber/reservoir in a volcanic eruption. When large volumes of magma are erupted over a short time, structural support for the rock above the magma chamber is lost. The ground surface then collapses downward into the emptied or partially emptied magma chamber, leaving a massive depression at the surface. Although sometimes described as a crater, the feature is actually a type of sinkhole, as it is formed through subsidence and collapse rather than an explosion or impact. Only seven caldera-forming collapses are known to have occurred since 1900, most recently at Bárðarbunga volcano, Iceland in 2014.

Amazon basin drainage basin in South America drained via the Amazon River into the Atlantic Ocean

The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. The Amazon drainage basin covers an area of about 6,300,000 km2 (2,400,000 sq mi), or about 35.5 percent that of the South American continent. It is located in the countries of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.

According to NOAA Aviation Weather, a Volcanic Ash Advisory was issued at 2017-10-18T 13:17:00Z for volcanic ash to 13,000 ft.


See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Reventador". Global Volcanism Program . Smithsonian Institution . Retrieved 2011-08-12.
  2. "Reventador volcano". 19 Feb 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Reventador Eruption History - Global Volcanism Program". volcano.si.edu. Smithsonian. Retrieved 2017-08-07.
  4. "Reventador Weekly Reports - Global Volcanism Program". volcano.si.edu. Smithsonian. Retrieved 2017-08-07.