Huequi

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Huequi
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Huequi
Location of Huequi in southern Chile
Highest point
Elevation 1,318 m (4,324 ft)
Coordinates 42°22′36″S72°34′41″W / 42.37667°S 72.57806°W / -42.37667; -72.57806
Geography
Location Chile
Parent range Andes
Geology
Mountain type Stratovolcano
Last eruption 1920 (?)

Huequi (Spanish pronunciation:  [weki] ) is a stratovolcano located in Los Lagos Region of Chile. It lies at the centre of the peninsula of the same name and close to the Gulf of Ancud. It has an elevation of 1,318 metres (4,324 ft). It has a sharp summit and reportedly "smoked" in the 1950s [1] and is made up from a lava dome complex situated in a depression of unclear origin, a postglacial lava dome Calle and a Pleistocene Porcelana volcano with Holocene parasitic cones. [2] [3]

Stratovolcano Tall, conical volcano built up by many layers of hardened lava and other ejecta

A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano, is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava, tephra, pumice and ash. Unlike shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile with a summit crater and periodic intervals of explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions, although some have collapsed summit craters called calderas. The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far, due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica, with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi).

Los Lagos Region Region of Chile

Los Lagos Region is one of Chile's 16 regions, which are first order administrative divisions, and comprises four provinces: Chiloé, Llanquihue, Osorno and Palena. The region contains the country's second largest island, Chiloé, and the second largest lake, Llanquihue.

Chile republic in South America

Chile, officially the Republic of Chile, is a South American country occupying a long, narrow strip of land between the Andes to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. It borders Peru to the north, Bolivia to the northeast, Argentina to the east, and the Drake Passage in the far south. Chilean territory includes the Pacific islands of Juan Fernández, Salas y Gómez, Desventuradas, and Easter Island in Oceania. Chile also claims about 1,250,000 square kilometres (480,000 sq mi) of Antarctica, although all claims are suspended under the Antarctic Treaty.

See also

Huinay is a tract of land belonging to the San Ignacio del Huinay Foundation. This territory covers nearly 350 km2 (135 sq mi) in the Commune of Hualaihué, in Los Lagos Region of Chile. It lies between the Comau or Leptepu fiord and the border with the Republic of Argentina in the Palena Province. Its location is 42°22′S72°24′W. Huinay also divides the private Pumalín Park belonging to American owner Douglas Tompkins into two parts. Tompkins wants to purchase it to unify his park, however, this has met with strong opposition from the people in the hamlet of Huinay.

Pumalín Park national monument of Chile

Pumalín Park is a 400,000 ha nature reserve in the Palena Province of Chile, created by the United States environmental foundation The Conservation Land Trust, which was endowed and led by the American business magnate Douglas Tompkins. Designated a Nature Sanctuary in 2005, Pumalín was Chile's largest private nature reserve and operated as a public-access park, with an extensive infrastructure of trails, campgrounds, and visitor centers. By an accord announced on 18 March 2017, the park was gifted to the Chilean state and consolidated with another 4,000,000 ha to become part of South America's largest national park.

Chaitén Town and Commune in Los Lagos, Chile

Chaitén is a Chilean town, commune and former capital of the Palena Province in Los Lagos Region. The town is north of the mouth of Yelcho River, on the east coast of the Gulf of Corcovado. The town is strategically close to the northern end of the Carretera Austral, where the highway goes inland. The Desertores Islands are part of the commune.

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References

Global Volcanism Program American research program

The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) documents Earth's volcanoes and their eruptive history over the past 10,000 years. The GVP reports on current eruptions from around the world as well as maintaining a database repository on active volcanoes and their eruptions. In this way, a global context for the planet's active volcanism is presented. Smithsonian reporting on current volcanic activity dates back to 1968, with the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena (CSLP). The GVP is housed in the Department of Mineral Sciences, part of the National Museum of Natural History, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Smithsonian Institution Group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government

The Smithsonian Institution, founded on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States. The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson. Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.

  1. United States. Hydrographic Office (1952). Sailing Directions for South America: The west coast from Golfo Corcovado to the Gulf of Panama including off-lying islands. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 69.
  2. J. Rabassa (22 September 2011). The Late Cenozoic of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. Elsevier. p. 101. ISBN   978-0-08-055889-9.
  3. Sebastian F.L. Watt; David M. Pyle; Tamsin A. Mather (July 2011). "Geology, petrology and geochemistry of the dome complex of Huequi volcano, southern Chile". Andean Geology. 38 (2): 335–348 via SciELO.