St Albans (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 51°44′24″N0°20′13″W / 51.740°N 0.337°W / 51.740; -0.337

Contents

St Albans
County constituency
for the House of Commons
StAlbans2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of St Albans in Hertfordshire
EnglandHertfordshire.svg
Location of Hertfordshire within England
County Hertfordshire
Electorate 70,298 (December 2010) [1]
Major settlements Bricket Wood, How Wood, Park Street, St Albans
Current constituency
Created 1885
Member of Parliament Daisy Cooper (Liberal Democrats)
Number of membersOne
Created from Hertfordshire
1554–1852
Number of membersTwo
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Replaced byHertfordshire
Created fromHertfordshire

St Albans is a constituency [n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2019 by Daisy Cooper, a Liberal Democrat. [n 2]

This article also describes the parliamentary borough (1554-1852) of the same name, consisting only of the city of St Albans, which elected two MPs by the bloc vote system.

History

The Parliamentary Borough of St Albans was represented by two MPs for over 300 years, until it was disenfranchised as a result of electoral corruption in 1852. [2]

The constituency was re-established in an enlarged form by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 (which followed on from the Third Reform Act) as one of four Divisions of the abolished three-member Parliamentary County of Hertfordshire, and was formally named as the Mid or St Albans Division of Hertfordshire.

1885 to date

Results of all deposit-keeping candidates since 1983 in their bid be the MP for St Albans (UK House of Commons). Results for St Albans since 1983.svg
Results of all deposit-keeping candidates since 1983 in their bid be the MP for St Albans (UK House of Commons).
Political history before 1997

Until 1997 the seat was held by one Conservative or another save for the very early 20th century Official Opposition leadership of Henry Campbell-Bannerman and the follow-on first part of his premiership, governing in minority, and later from 1945 five of the six years seeing Labour's landslide Attlee ministry.

Political history since 1997

The seat swung towards the left wing on boundary changes effective in 1997, and the founding of the New Labour movement which sought public sector reform and investment with expansion based on international investor-friendly economic growth. The seat followed its projections in line with the large swing led by Tony Blair, to sees its return to a Labour politician. Results, except for a strong Tory surge in 2015 are closer than the 19791992 Tory victories forming a complex three-party contest only once another candidate in this time has reached the deposit (politics)-retaining threshold of 5% of the vote, UKIP at its 2015 peak.

Despite the former Labour MP for the seat, Kerry Pollard, standing there in 2005, 2015 and 2017, he fell varyingly short. The 2019 vote share fell to below that seen in the 1980s, locally, for the party's candidate the party leader was to the left of the party, Jeremy Corbyn.

The seat has had great fluctuation in Liberal Democrat vote share: 2001 and 2015 were ebbs at below 20% of the vote; in 2010 and 2017 the Liberal Democrat candidate, promisingly, took 4.4% and 10.7% less than the winning Conservative. Liberal Democrat Daisy Cooper went on to win, in 2019. She became first member of a liberal party to represent the constituency since John Bamford Slack in early 1900s.

Prominent members

The noble and local landowning Grimston family have produced nine members throughout the seat's history. The three first heirs to the Earldom of Verulam have won election in the seat - the latest MP from the family was John Grimston who later became the 6th Earl (died 1973).

Sir Hildred Carlile (died 1942) was a textiles entrepreneur and generous benefactor of Bedford College, University of London.

Francis Fremantle was chairman of the Parliamentary Medical Committee from 1923 to 1943.

Peter Lilley was a frontbench minister in government from 1992 until 1997, the Secretary of State for Social Security, after two years as Secretary of State for Trade and Industry.

Constituency profile

Workless claimants (registered jobseekers) were in November 2012 significantly lower than the national average of 3.8%, at 1.9% of the population based on a statistical compilation by The Guardian . [3] The seat voted decisively to remain in the European Union in the 2016 Referendum, estimated at 62.2%.

Boundary changes

St Albans (UK Parliament constituency)
Map of current boundaries

1885–1918: The Municipal Borough of St Albans, the Sessional Divisions of Barnet and St Albans and parts of the Sessional Divisions of Watford, Hertford and Dacorum. [4]

As well from the Borough of St Albans, the seat included the towns of Harpenden, Hatfield and Chipping Barnet.

1918–1945: The Municipal Borough of St Albans, the Urban Districts of Barnet and East Barnet Valley, the Rural Districts of Barnet and Hatfield, and the Rural District of St Albans civil parishes of Sandridge Rural, St Michael Rural, St Peter Rural, and St Stephen. [5]

North-western parts, including Harpenden, transferred to the new Hemel Hempstead Division. South-western corner (Aldenham) transferred to Watford.

1945–1950: The Municipal Borough of St Albans, the Urban District of Welwyn Garden City, the Rural District of Hatfield, and the Rural District of St Albans civil parishes of Sandridge Rural, St Michael Rural, St Peter Rural, and St Stephen. [6]

The Urban Districts of Barnet and East Barnet (formerly East Barnet Valley) and the Rural District of Elstree (formerly Barnet) formed the new Barnet Division. The Urban District of Welwyn Garden City had been formed as a separate local authority which had previously been partly in the Hitchin Division.  Other marginal changes as a result of changes to local authority boundaries.

1950–1955: The Municipal Borough of St Albans, the Urban District of Welwyn Garden City, the Rural District of Welwyn, and the Rural District of St Albans civil parishes of Sandridge Rural, St Michael Rural, St Peter Rural, St Stephen, and Wheathampstead. [7]

The Rural District of Welwyn was transferred from Hitchin and the parish of Wheathampstead from Hemel Hempstead.  The Rural District of Hatfield was transferred to Barnet.

1955–1974: The Municipal Borough of St Albans, and in the Rural District of St Albans the civil parishes of Colney Heath, London Colney, Sandridge Rural, St Michael Rural, St Stephen, and Wheathampstead.

The Urban District of Welwyn Garden City and the Rural District of Welwyn transferred to Hertford. (The parish of St Peter Rural had been divided into the parishes of Colney Heath and London Colney).

1974–1983: The Municipal Borough of St Albans, the Urban District of Harpenden, and in the Rural District of St Albans the civil parishes of Harpenden Rural, Redbourn, St Michael Rural, Sandridge, and Wheathampstead. [8]

The limits moved northwards: to take in Harpenden U.D. and parishes Harpenden Rural and Redbourn, from Hemel Hempstead.  The parishes of Colney Heath, London Colney and St Stephen were removed to help constitute South Hertfordshire.

1983–1997: The District of St Albans wards of Ashley, Batchwood, Clarence, Colney Heath, Cunningham, Harpenden East, Harpenden North, Harpenden South, Harpenden West, Marshalswick North, Marshalswick South, Redbourn, St Peter's, Sandridge, Sopwell, and Verulam. [9]

Minor changes.  Colney Heath transferred from abolished South Hertfordshire.  Wheathampstead transferred to Welwyn Hatfield.

1997–2010: The District of St Albans wards of Ashley, Batchwood, Clarence, Colney Heath, Cunningham, London Colney, Marshalswick North, Marshalswick South, Park Street, St Peter's, St Stephen's, Sopwell, and Verulam, and the District of Three Rivers ward of Bedmond. [10]

Moved southwards again, gaining London Colney from Hertsmere, Park Street and St Stephen's from Watford and the Three Rivers District ward of Bedmond from South West Hertfordshire.  Northern parts, including Harpenden, formed part of the new County Constituency of Hitchin and Harpenden.

2010–present: The City of St Albans wards of Ashley, Batchwood, Clarence, Colney Heath, Cunningham, London Colney, Marshalswick North, Marshalswick South, Park Street, St Peter's, St Stephen, Sopwell, and Verulam, and the Three Rivers District ward of Bedmond and Primrose Hill. [11]

Marginal adjustments to bring the parliamentary boundaries in line with those of local government wards, which had changed since the 1995 review. [12]

The seat is in Hertfordshire, England. Specifically, it comprises the cathedral city of St Albans and some of the surrounding countryside, mainly to the south of the city.

Neighbouring seats, clockwise from north, are: Hitchin and Harpenden, Welwyn Hatfield, Hertsmere, Watford, and Hemel Hempstead.

Members of Parliament

MPs 1553–1640

ParliamentFirst memberSecond member
1553 (Oct) John Maynard Thomas Johnson [13]
1554 (Apr) Thomas Wendy Oliver Starkey [13]
1554 (Nov) John Maynard Oliver Starkey [13]
1555 John Astley Robert Stepneth [13]
1558 Henry Heydon Francis Southwell [13]
1559 (Jan) Christopher Smith John Dodmer [14]
1562–3 Robert Wroth [15] Roger Carew [14]
1571 William Skipwith George Ferrers [14]
1572 (Apr) Henry Cocke Charles Smythe [14]
1584 Henry Maynard Humphrey Coningsby [14]
1586 (Oct) Henry Maynard Humphrey Coningsby [14]
1588 (Oct) Henry Maynard Humphrey Coningsby [14]
1593 Henry Maynard Humphrey Coningsby [14]
1597 (Oct) Henry Maynard Humphrey Coningsby [14]
1601 Francis Bacon, sat for Ipswich,
replaced Nov 1601 by
Henry Frowick
Adolphus Carey [14]
1604 Sir Francis Bacon, sat for Ipswich
repl. by
Tobie Matthew
Adolphus Carey
1610 Sir Thomas Parry Sir Henry Helmes
1614 Sir Francis Bacon, sat for Cambridge University
repl. by
Thomas Perient
Henry Finch
1620 Sir Thomas Richardson Robert Shute
1621 Sir Thomas Richardson Henry Meautys
1624 Sir Arthur Capell Sir John Luke
1625 Sir Charles Morrison, 1st Baronet Sir John Luke
1626 Sir Charles Morrison, 1st Baronet Sir Edward Goring
1628 Sir John Jennings Robert Kirkham
1629–1640No Parliaments summoned

MPs 1640–1852

YearFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
April 1640 Richard Coningsby Sir John Jennings Parliamentarian
November 1640 Edward Wingate Parliamentarian
1642 Richard Jennings Parliamentarian
December 1648Wingate and Jennings excluded in Pride's Purge - both seats vacant
1653St Albans was unrepresented in the Barebones Parliament
1654 Alban Cox St Albans had only one seat in the First and
Second Parliaments of the Protectorate
1656
January 1659 Richard Jennings
May 1659 Not represented in the restored Rump
April 1660 William Foxwist Richard Jennings
1661 Thomas Arris
1668 Samuel Grimston
February 1679 Sir Thomas Blount John Gape
August 1679 Samuel Grimston
1685 Captain George Churchill [16] Thomas Docwra
1689 Sir Samuel Grimston
January 1701 Joshua Lomax
March 1701 John Gape
1705 Admiral Henry Killigrew
1708 John Gape Joshua Lomax
1710 William Grimston [17]
1713 William Hale [18]
1714 John Gape
1715 William Hale
1717 Joshua Lomax
1722 William Gore William Clayton
1727 The Viscount Grimston Caleb Lomax
1730 by-election Thomas Gape
1733 by-election John Merrill
1734 Sir Thomas Aston Thomas Ashby
1741 James West [19]
1743 by-election Hans Stanley
1747 Sir Peter Thompson
1754 Hon. James Grimston [20]
1761 Viscount Nuneham
1768 (Sir) Richard Sutton [21] John Radcliffe
1780 William Charles Sloper
1783 by-election The Viscount Grimston
1784 Hon. William Grimston
1790 Hon. Richard Bingham [22] Tory [23] John Calvert
1796 Thomas Bucknall Tory [23]
June 1800 by-election William Stephen Poyntz Whig [23]
1802 Hon. James Grimston Tory [23]
1807 Joseph Thompson Halsey Whig [23]
1809 by-election Daniel Giles Whig [23]
1812 Christopher Smith Tory [23]
February 1818 by-election William Tierney Robarts Whig [23]
June 1818 Lord Charles Spencer-Churchill Tory [23]
1820 Christopher Smith Tory [23]
1821 by-election Sir Henry Wright-Wilson Tory [23]
1826 John Easthope Whig [23]
1830 Viscount Grimston Tory [23] Charles Tennant Whig [23]
1831 Sir Francis Vincent, Bt Whig [23] Richard Godson Whig [23] [24]
1832 Henry George Ward Whig [23]
1835 Hon. Edward Grimston Conservative [23]
1837 George Muskett Whig [23] [25] [26] [27]
February 1841 by-election William Hare Whig [23] [26] [27]
June 1841 George Repton Conservative [23]
1846 by-election Benjamin Bond Cabbell Conservative
1847 Alexander Raphael Whig [28]
1850 by-election Jacob Bell Whig [29] [30] [31]
1852 Constituency disfranchised for corruption

MPs since 1885

ElectionMember [32] Party [33] [34]
1885 James Grimston Conservative
1892 Vicary Gibbs Conservative
1904 by-election John Slack Liberal
1906 Sir Hildred Carlile Conservative
1919 by-election Sir Francis Fremantle Conservative
1943 by-election [35] John Grimston Conservative
1945 Cyril Dumpleton Labour
1950 John Grimston Conservative
1959 Sir Victor Goodhew Conservative
1983 Peter Lilley Conservative
1997 Kerry Pollard Labour
2005 Anne Main Conservative
2019 Daisy Cooper Liberal Democrats

Election results

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: St Albans [36] [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Democrats Daisy Cooper 28,867 50.1 +17.7
Conservative Anne Main 22,57439.2―3.9
Labour Rebecca Lury5,0008.7―14.3
Green Simon Grover 1,0041.7+0.2
Independent Jules Sherrington1540.3New
Majority6,29310.9N/A
Turnout 57,59978.1―0.2
Liberal Democrats gain from Conservative Swing +10.8
General election 2017: St Albans [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Anne Main 24,571 43.1 ―3.5
Liberal Democrats Daisy Cooper 18,46232.4+13.9
Labour Kerry Pollard 13,13723.0―0.3
Green Jack Easton8281.5―2.2
Majority6,10910.7―12.6
Turnout 56,99878.3+6.3
Conservative hold Swing ―8.7
General election 2015: St Albans [39] [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Anne Main 25,392 46.6 +5.8
Labour Kerry Pollard 12,66023.3+5.7
Liberal Democrats Sandy Walkington10,07618.5―17.9
UKIP Chris Wright4,2717.8+4.0
Green Jack Easton2,0343.7+2.3
Majority12,73223.3+18.9
Turnout 54,43372.0―3.4
Conservative hold Swing +0.1
General election 2010: St Albans [41] [42] [43]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Conservative Anne Main 21,533 40.8
Liberal Democrats Sandy Walkington19,22836.4
Labour Roma Mills9,28817.6
UKIP John Stocker2,0283.8
Green Jack Easton7581.4
Majority2,3054.4
Turnout 52,83575.4
Conservative hold

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: St Albans [44] [45]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Anne Main 16,953 37.3 +2.1
Labour Kerry Pollard 15,59234.3―11.1
Liberal Democrats Michael Green11,56125.4+7.5
UKIP Richard Evans7071.6+0.2
St Albans PartyJanet Girsman4300.9New
Independent Mark Reynolds2190.5New
Majority1,3613.0N/A
Turnout 45,46270.00+3.7
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +6.6
General election 2001: St Albans [46] [47]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Kerry Pollard 19,889 45.4 +3.4
Conservative Charlie Elphicke 15,42335.2+2.0
Liberal Democrats Nick Rijke7,84717.9–3.1
UKIP Chris Sherwin6021.4New
Majority4,46610.2+1.4
Turnout 43,76166.3–11.2
Labour hold Swing +0.7

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: St Albans [48] [49]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Labour Kerry Pollard 21,338 42.0
Conservative David Rutley 16,87933.2
Liberal Democrats Anthony Rowlands10,69221.0
Referendum Jim Warrilow1,6193.2
Rainbow Dream Ticket Sari Craigen1660.3
Natural Law Ian Docker1110.2
Majority4,4598.8
Turnout 50,80577.5
Labour gain from Conservative
General election 1992: St Albans [50] [51]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Peter Lilley 32,709 52.8 +0.3
Liberal Democrats Monica Howes16,30526.3-8.2
Labour Kerry Pollard 12,01619.4+7.9
Green Craig Simmons7341.2-0.1
Natural Law David Lucas1610.3New
Majority16,40426.5+8.5
Turnout 61,92583.5+3.3
Conservative hold Swing -4.3

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: St Albans [52] [53]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Peter Lilley 31,726 52.5 +0.4
Liberal Alexander Walkington20,84534.5-2.5
Labour Co-op Tony McWalter 6,92211.5+0.6
Green Elaine Field7881.3New
CPRPWilliam Pass1100.2New
Majority10,88118.0+2.9
Turnout 60,39180.2+1.9
Conservative hold Swing +1.5
General election 1983: St Albans [54] [55]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Conservative Peter Lilley 29,676 52.1
Liberal Alexander Walkington21,11537.0
Labour R Austin6,21310.9
Majority8,56115.1
Turnout 57,00478.3
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: St Albans [56] [57]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 31,301 53.1 +8.1
Liberal David Michael Picton14,05723.8-3.1
Labour Co-op Ronald John Greaves13,63823.1-5.1
Majority17,24429.3+12.5
Turnout 58,99680.4+2.4
Conservative hold Swing +5.6
General election October 1974: St Albans [57] [58]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 24,436 45.0 -0.2
Labour Edwin Hudson15,30128.2+4.1
Liberal Charles Anthony Shaw14,61426.9-3.8
Majority9,13516.8+2.3
Turnout 54,35178.0-6.6
Conservative hold Swing -2.15
General election February 1974: St Albans [57] [59]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 26,345 45.2
Liberal Charles Anthony Shaw17,92430.7
Labour Daniel Lipman Bernstein14,07724.1
Majority8,42114.5
Turnout 58,35684.6
Conservative hold
General election 1970: St Albans [60]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 24,503 51.5 +3.8
Labour Christopher Hubert Beaumont16,62935.0-6.6
Liberal Charles Anthony Shaw6,43913.5+2.8
Majority7,87416.5+10.4
Turnout 47,57176.2-6.8
Conservative hold Swing +5.3

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: St Albans [61]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 22,260 47.7 -0.3
Labour Keith Kyle 19,42841.6+5.3
Liberal Julian J Wates4,97710.7-5.0
Majority2,8326.1-5.6
Turnout 46,66583.0+0.4
Conservative hold Swing -2.8
General election 1964: St Albans [62]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 22,063 48.0 -4.9
Labour Bruce Douglas-Mann 16,67236.3+2.8
Liberal William Glanville Brown7,23115.7+2.1
Majority5,39111.7-7.7
Turnout 45,96682.6-0.2
Conservative hold Swing -3.9

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: St Albans [63]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Victor Goodhew 23,157 52.9 -4.6
Labour Lawrence William Carroll14,65033.5-9.0
Liberal WA Newton Jones5,94813.6New
Majority8,50719.4+4.4
Turnout 52,82382.8+3.5
Conservative hold Swing +2.2
General election 1955: St Albans [64]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Conservative John Grimston 21,828 57.5
Labour Renée Short 16,10742.5
Majority5,72115.0
Turnout 37,93579.3
Conservative hold
General election 1951: St Albans [65]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Grimston 28,602 54.5 +7.3
Labour John McKnight23,91145.5+2.8
Majority4,6919.0+4.5
Turnout 52,51384.1-0.9
Conservative hold Swing +2.2
General election 1950: St Albans [66]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Conservative John Grimston 24,733 47.2
Labour Cyril Dumpleton 22,35142.7
Liberal Deryck Abel 5,28010.1
Majority2,3824.5
Turnout 52,46485.0
Conservative gain from Labour

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: St Albans
PartyCandidateVotes%
Labour Cyril Dumpleton 24,241 46.5
Conservative John Grimston 22,36242.8
Liberal Enid Lakeman 5,60110.7
Majority1,8793.7
Turnout 50,38472.6
Labour gain from Conservative
1943 St Albans by-election [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Grimston Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1935: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Francis Fremantle 33,743 67.5 -10.6
Labour Hugh Franklin 16,23335.5+13.6
Majority17,51035.0-21.2
Turnout 49,97662.6-9.3
Conservative hold Swing -10.6
General election 1931: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Francis Fremantle 36,690 78.1 +30.0
Labour Monica Whately 10,28921.9-5.7
Majority26,40156.2+35.7
Turnout 46,97971.9-0.7
Conservative hold Swing +17.8

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Francis Fremantle 20,436 48.1 -19.4
Labour Monica Whately 11,69927.6-4.9
Liberal George Gordon Honeyman10,29924.3New
Majority8,73720.5-14.5
Turnout 41,43472.6+2.3
Unionist hold Swing -7.25
General election 1924: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Francis Fremantle 18,004 67.5 +19.8
Labour Frank Herbert8,86232.5+6.0
Majority9,32235.0+13.8
Turnout 26,86470.3+1.5
Unionist hold Swing +6.9
General election 1923: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Francis Fremantle 11,968 47.7 -10.1
Labour Christopher Thomson 6,64026.5-15.7
Liberal Harry Krauss Nield6,46925.8New
Majority5,32821.2+5.6
Turnout 25,07768.8-2.3
Unionist hold Swing +2.8
General election 1922: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Francis Fremantle 14,594 57.8 +12.0
Labour John W. Brown 10,66242.2-0.2
Majority3,93215.6+12.2
Turnout 25,25671.1+8.3
Unionist hold Swing +6.1
Fremantle Francis Edward Fremantle.jpg
Fremantle

Elections in the 1910s

1919 St Albans by-election [34] [67]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Unionist Francis Fremantle 9,62145.8N/A
Labour John W. Brown 8,90842.4New
Liberal Milner Gray 2,47411.8New
Majority7133.4N/A
Turnout 21,00362.8N/A
Unionist hold Swing N/A
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.
General election 1918: St Albans [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Unionist Hildred Carlile Unopposed
Unionist hold
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.
Phillimore Robert Charles Phillimore.jpg
Phillimore
General election, December 1910: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hildred Carlile 6,899 59.1 +1.0
Liberal Robert Charles Phillimore 4,77740.9-1.0
Majority2,12218.2+2.0
Turnout 11,67683.8-6.6
Conservative hold Swing +1.0
General election, January 1910: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hildred Carlile 7,323 58.1 +5.6
Liberal Henry Roscoe Beddoes5,27141.9-5.6
Majority2,05216.2+11.2
Turnout 12,59490.4+10.1
Conservative hold Swing +5.6

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hildred Carlile 5,856 52.5 N/A
Liberal John Bamford Slack 5,30447.5N/A
Majority5525.0N/A
Turnout 11,16089.3N/A
Registered electors 12,497
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Slack Bamford Slack.jpg
Slack
1904 St Albans by-election [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Bamford Slack 4,757 50.7 New
Conservative Vicary Gibbs 4,63549.3N/A
Majority1321.4N/A
Turnout 9,38281.5N/A
Registered electors 11,518
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
General election 1900: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Vicary Gibbs Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Vicary Gibbs Unopposed
Conservative hold
Gibbs Vicary Gibbs MP.jpg
Gibbs
General election 1892: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Vicary Gibbs 3,417 45.1 N/A
Liberal Thomas Morgan Harvey [68] 2,57334.0New
Ind. Conservative William Henry Bingham-Cox1,58020.9New
Majority84411.1N/A
Turnout 7,57078.3N/A
Registered electors 9,672
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative James Grimston Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1885: St Albans [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative James Grimston 4,108 57.5
Liberal John Coles 3,03742.5
Majority1,07115.0
Turnout 7,14581.7
Registered electors 8,741
Conservative win (new seat)

Elections in the 1850s

On 3 May 1852, the borough was disenfranchised after a Royal Commission found proof of extensive bribery. The electorate was incorporated into Hertfordshire. [69]

By-election, 24 December 1850: St Albans [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Jacob Bell 276 65.2 5.0
Conservative Robert Carden 14734.8+5.0
Majority12930.4+28.4
Turnout 42387.6+0.5
Registered electors 483
Whig hold Swing 5.0

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1847: St Albans [69] [70]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Alexander Raphael 295 31.8 +4.6
Conservative George Repton 276 29.8 27.1
Whig John Wilks 23024.8+9.0
Whig Frederick Craven [71] 12613.6N/A
Turnout 464 (est)87.1 (est)3.5
Registered electors 532
Majority192.0+1.3
Whig hold Swing +9.1
Majority465.0+1.8
Conservative hold Swing 27.1
By-election, 11 August 1846: St Albans [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Benjamin Bond Cabbell 264 63.9 7.0
Whig William Hare 14936.1+6.9
Majority11527.8N/A
Turnout 41376.314.3
Registered electors 541
Conservative gain from Whig Swing 7.0
General election 1841: St Albans [23] [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative George Repton 288 30.4 8.5
Whig William Hare 258 27.2 +8.5
Conservative Henry Thomas Worley25126.5+2.9
Whig George Alfred Muskett15015.82.9
Turnout 48290.63.7
Registered electors 532
Majority303.2+1.7
Conservative hold Swing 5.7
Majority70.713.1
Whig hold Swing +5.7
By-election, 9 February 1841: St Albans [23] [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig William Hare 252 55.1 +17.7
Conservative Benjamin Bond Cabbell 20544.917.6
Majority4710.2N/A
Turnout 45785.98.4
Registered electors 532
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +17.7

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1837: St Albans [23] [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Edward Grimston361 38.9 2.1
Whig George Alfred Muskett 347 37.4 +5.2
Conservative Benjamin Bond Cabbell 21923.63.2
Turnout 56194.3c.+13.1
Registered electors 595
Majority141.57.3
Conservative hold Swing 2.4
Majority12813.8+8.4
Whig hold Swing +5.3
General election 1835: St Albans [23] [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Edward Grimston362 41.0 +25.5
Whig Henry George Ward 284 32.2 36.7
Conservative William Horsley Beresford [72] 23726.8+11.3
Turnout c.442c.81.2c.15.8
Registered electors 544
Majority788.8N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +22.0
Majority475.4+2.9
Whig hold Swing 36.8
General election 1832: St Albans [23] [69]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Francis Vincent 392 35.3 2.2
Whig Henry George Ward 373 33.6 2.5
Tory William Turner34531.1+4.7
Majority282.57.2
Turnout 63797.0c.+9.5
Registered electors 657
Whig hold Swing 2.3
Whig hold Swing 2.4
General election 1831: St Albans [23] [73]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Whig Francis Vincent 421 37.5 +8.9
Whig Richard Godson 406 36.1 +10.3
Tory James Grimston 29726.419.2
Majority1099.7+6.9
Turnout 656c.87.5c.+4.4
Registered electors c.750
Whig hold Swing +9.3
Whig gain from Tory Swing +10.0
General election 1830: St Albans [23] [73]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Tory James Grimston 495 45.6
Whig Charles Tennant 311 28.6
Whig Henry Gally Knight 28025.8
Turnout 623c.83.1
Registered electors c.750
Majority18417.0
Tory hold
Majority312.8
Whig hold

See also

Notes

  1. A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, its registered electors elect one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.

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