Washington County, Vermont

Last updated

Washington County
Montpelier courthouse 6.JPG
Washington County Courthouse
Map of Vermont highlighting Washington County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Vermont
Vermont in United States.svg
Vermont's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°14′57″N72°34′51″W / 44.249287°N 72.580894°W / 44.249287; -72.580894
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Vermont.svg  Vermont
Founded1811
Named for George Washington
Shire Town Montpelier
Largest city Barre
Area
  Total695 sq mi (1,800 km2)
  Land687 sq mi (1,780 km2)
  Water8.2 sq mi (21 km2)  1.2%%
Population
 (2020)
  Total59,807 Increase2.svg
  Density86/sq mi (33/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district At-large

Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont. Named after George Washington, its county seat is the city of Montpelier (the least populous state capital in the United States) and the most populous municipality is the city of Barre. [1] As of the 2020 census, the population was 59,807, [2] making it the third-most populous county in Vermont, but the third-least populous capital county in the United States after Hughes County, South Dakota and Franklin County, Kentucky. Washington County comprises the Barre, Vermont micropolitan statistical area. In 2010, the center of population of Vermont was located in Washington County, in the town of Warren. [3]

Contents

History

Washington County is one of several Vermont counties created from land ceded by the state of New York on January 15, 1777, when Vermont declared itself to be a distinct state from New York. [4] [5] [6] The land originally was contested by Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Netherland, but it remained undelineated until July 20, 1764, when King George III established the boundary between New Hampshire and New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts and south of the parallel of 45 degrees north latitude. New York assigned the land gained to Albany County. [7] [8] On March 12, 1772, Albany County was partitioned to create Charlotte County, [9] and this situation remained until Vermont's independence from New York and Britain.

Washington County was originally established as Jefferson County in 1810 from parts of Caledonia County, Chittenden County, and Orange County and organized the following year. [10]

In 1814 it was renamed to Washington County. The name change occurred after the Federalists took control of the Vermont Legislature from the Jeffersonians. Vermont which conducted significant trade with British Canada had suffered particularly by passage of the Embargo Act of 1807 during the Jefferson administration. [11]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 695 square miles (1,800 km2), of which 687 square miles (1,780 km2) is land and 8.2 square miles (21 km2) (1.2%) is water. [12]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 14,113
1830 21,37851.5%
1840 23,50610.0%
1850 24,6544.9%
1860 27,61212.0%
1870 26,520−4.0%
1880 25,404−4.2%
1890 29,60616.5%
1900 36,60723.6%
1910 41,70213.9%
1920 38,921−6.7%
1930 41,7337.2%
1940 41,546−0.4%
1950 42,8703.2%
1960 42,8600.0%
1970 47,65911.2%
1980 52,3939.9%
1990 54,9284.8%
2000 58,0395.7%
2010 59,5342.6%
2020 59,8070.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [13]
1790–1960 [14] 1900–1990 [15]
1990–2000 [16] 2010–2018 [2]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 59,534 people, 25,027 households, and 15,410 families residing in the county. [17] The population density was 86.6 inhabitants per square mile (33.4/km2). There were 29,941 housing units at an average density of 43.6 per square mile (16.8/km2). [18]

Of the 25,027 households, 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.1% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.4% were non-families, and 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.81. The median age was 42.3 years. [17]

The median income for a household in the county was $55,313 and the median income for a family was $66,968. Males had a median income of $45,579 versus $38,052 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,337. About 5.9% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over. [19]

Elections

In 1828, Washington County was won by National Republican Party candidate John Quincy Adams.

In 1832, the county was won by Democratic Party incumbent president Andrew Jackson. Democratic Martin Van Buren was also able to win the county in 1836.

In 1840, the county was won by Whig Party candidate William Henry Harrison.

In 1844, the county was won by Democratic candidate James K. Polk. Democratic candidate Lewis Cass was also able to win the county in 1848.

In 1852, Whig Party candidate Winfield Scott won the county.

From John C. Frémont in 1856 to Richard Nixon in 1960, the Republican Party would have a 104-year winning streak within Washington County.

In 1964, the county was won by Democratic Party incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Following the Democrats victory in 1964, the county went back to voting for Republican candidates for another 20 year winning streak starting with Richard Nixon in 1968 and ending with George H. W. Bush in 1988, who became the last Republican presidential candidate to win the county.

In 1992, the county was won by Bill Clinton and has been won by Democratic candidates ever since.

United States presidential election results for Washington County, Vermont [20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 8,92825.29%25,19171.35%1,1883.36%
2016 7,99325.71%18,59459.81%4,49914.47%
2012 8,09327.61%20,35169.44%8632.94%
2008 9,12928.35%22,32469.33%7472.32%
2004 11,46136.44%19,17760.98%8102.58%
2000 11,44838.48%15,28151.37%3,02010.15%
1996 7,75029.94%14,26755.12%3,86714.94%
1992 9,42432.12%13,45245.85%6,46222.03%
1988 13,25350.40%12,69048.26%3511.33%
1984 13,70654.48%11,16344.37%2891.15%
1980 9,71441.96%9,55941.29%3,87816.75%
1976 10,91953.90%8,76443.26%5762.84%
1972 12,42161.58%7,59637.66%1520.75%
1968 9,38752.62%7,82643.87%6263.51%
1964 5,75032.37%12,00267.57%110.06%
1960 10,45859.49%7,11640.48%40.02%
1956 11,35171.50%4,52028.47%50.03%
1952 11,97972.59%4,46027.03%640.39%
1948 7,72059.92%4,83937.56%3242.51%
1944 7,16255.47%5,74944.53%00.00%
1940 8,42652.00%7,72747.69%500.31%
1936 8,35150.64%8,07348.96%660.40%
1932 8,39357.72%5,77739.73%3702.54%
1928 9,89168.91%4,40830.71%540.38%
1924 8,52574.30%1,71514.95%1,23410.75%
1920 6,41875.76%1,95323.06%1001.18%
1916 4,21657.11%2,73237.01%4345.88%
1912 2,79741.26%1,74325.71%2,23933.03%
1908 3,82367.86%1,61028.58%2013.57%
1904 3,80772.07%1,24723.61%2284.32%
1900 3,81968.94%1,62229.28%991.79%
1896 4,47673.10%1,39622.80%2514.10%
1892 3,13460.28%1,94037.31%1252.40%
1888 3,71564.70%1,89232.95%1352.35%
1884 3,12960.00%1,81234.75%2745.25%
1880 3,61162.67%1,92733.44%2243.89%

Communities

Cities

Towns

Village

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Education

School districts include: [21]

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Montpelier, Vermont</span> Capital city of Vermont, United States

Montpelier is the capital city of the U.S. state of Vermont and the seat of Washington County. The site of Vermont's state government, it is the least populous state capital in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 8,074. However, the daytime population grows to about 21,000, due to the large number of jobs within city limits. The Vermont College of Fine Arts is located in the municipality. It was named after Montpellier, a city in the south of France.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Berlin, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Berlin is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States, founded in 1763.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">East Montpelier, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

East Montpelier is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 2,598 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Middlesex, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Middlesex is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,779 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Roxbury, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Roxbury is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States, created by Vermont charter on August 6, 1781. The population was 678 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Waitsfield, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Waitsfield is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,844 as of the 2020 census. It was created by a Vermont charter on February 25, 1782, and was granted to militia Generals Benjamin Wait, Roger Enos and others. The town was named after Wait.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Barre, Vermont (city)</span> City in Vermont, United States

Barre is the most populous city in Washington County, Vermont, United States. As of the 2020 census, the municipal population was 8,491. Popularly referred to as "Barre City", it is almost completely surrounded by "Barre Town", which is a separate municipality.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Northfield, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Northfield is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. The town lies in a valley within the Green Mountains and has been home to Norwich University since 1866. It contains the village of Northfield, where over half of the population lives. The town's total population was 5,918 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Waterbury, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Waterbury is a town in Washington County in central Vermont, United States. Although the town is still home to the Waterbury Village Historic District, the village sharing the name of the town officially dissolved as a municipality in 2018. As of the 2020 census, the population was 5,331.

The Washington Senate District is one of 13 Vermont Senate districts included in the redistricting and reapportionment plan developed by the Vermont General Assembly following the 2000 U.S. Census. The plan applies to legislatures elected in 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. A new plan will be developed in 2012 following the 2010 U.S. Census.

References

  1. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  3. "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 6, 2014.
  4. Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. P. 70-73.
  5. Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 64.
  6. Williamson, Chilton. Vermont in Quandary: 1763-1825. Growth of Vermont series, Number 4. Montpelier: Vermont Historical Series, 1949. PP. 82-84; map facing 95, 100-102, 112-113.
  7. Slade, William, Jr., comp. Vermont State Papers: Being a collection of Records and Documents Connected with the Assumption and Establishment of Government by the People of Vermont, Together with the Journal of the Council of Safety, the First Constitution, the Early Journals of the General Assembly, and the Laws from the Year 1779 to 1786, Inclusive. Middlebury, 1823. pp.13-19.
  8. Van Zandt, Franklin K. Boundaries of the United States and the Several States. Geological Survey Professional Paper 909. Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1976. The Standard Compilation for its subject. P. 63.
  9. New York Colonial Laws, Chapter 1534; Section 5; Paragraph 321)
  10. "Vermont: Individual County Chronologies". Vermont Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  11. "And They Called The County Washington". Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce. Central Vermont Magazine. Summer 1988. Retrieved October 10, 2016.
  12. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  13. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  14. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  15. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  16. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  17. 1 2 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  18. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  19. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  20. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  21. "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Washington County, VT" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved July 22, 2022. - Text list

Coordinates: 44°16′N72°37′W / 44.27°N 72.62°W / 44.27; -72.62