Addison County, Vermont

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Coordinates: 44°03′N73°07′W / 44.050°N 73.117°W / 44.050; -73.117

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Addison County
Addison County Court House.jpg
Addison County courthouse in Middlebury
Map of Vermont highlighting Addison County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Vermont
Vermont in United States.svg
Vermont's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°01′58″N73°10′05″W / 44.032776°N 73.167923°W / 44.032776; -73.167923
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Vermont.svg  Vermont
Founded1785
Named for Joseph Addison
Shire Town Middlebury
Largest townMiddlebury
Area
  Total808 sq mi (2,090 km2)
  Land766 sq mi (1,980 km2)
  Water41 sq mi (110 km2)  5.1%%
Population
 (2020)
  Total37,363
  Density46/sq mi (18/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district At-large
Website www.addisoncounty.com

Addison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont. As of the 2020 census, the population was 37,363. [1] Its shire town (county seat) is the town of Middlebury. [2]

History

Iroquois settled in the county before Europeans arrived in 1609. French settlers in Crown Point, New York extended their settlements across Lake Champlain. A few individuals or families came up the lake from Canada and established themselves at Chimney Point in 1730. In 1731, Fort Frederic was erected at Cross Point. In 1759, General Amherst occupied Cross Point and British settlers came in.[ citation needed ] The Battle of Bennington in Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, brought a turning point for the American independence against British.

Addison County was established by act of the Legislature October 18, 1785, [3] during the period of Vermont Republic. In 1791, Vermont joined the federal union after the original thirteen colonies. The main product of the county was wheat. In the 1820s farmers began to raise sheep.[ citation needed ] The Champlain Canal was opened on 1823, making it possible for ships to navigate from the Hudson River. In 1840, the county produced more wool than any other county in the United States. [3]

When Vermont was admitted into the Union in 1791, there were 9,267 people living in Addison County. By 1830, the population had grown to 26,503 people.[ citation needed ]

In 2008, the federal government declared the county a disaster area after severe storms and flooding June 14–17. [4]

Geography

Lake Dunmore is located in Salisbury and Leicester, entirely within Addison County. Dunmore.jpg
Lake Dunmore is located in Salisbury and Leicester, entirely within Addison County.
Eastern view from Vermont Route 17 in Addison of Snake Mountain (right) and Mount Abraham (center). SnakeMT 20151011 (23945838081).jpg
Eastern view from Vermont Route 17 in Addison of Snake Mountain (right) and Mount Abraham (center).

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 808 square miles (2,090 km2), of which 766 square miles (1,980 km2) is land and 41 square miles (110 km2) (5.1%) is water. [5] It is the third-largest county in Vermont by total area.[ citation needed ]

Addison County is located in the western half of the state of Vermont and nearly in the center north and south; between 43° 50′ and 44° 10′ north latitude. The primary stream of the county is Otter Creek, which runs through the county from the south to the north.[ citation needed ]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 6,420
1800 13,417109.0%
1810 19,99849.0%
1820 20,4692.4%
1830 24,94021.8%
1840 23,583−5.4%
1850 26,54912.6%
1860 24,010−9.6%
1870 23,484−2.2%
1880 24,1732.9%
1890 22,277−7.8%
1900 21,912−1.6%
1910 20,010−8.7%
1920 18,666−6.7%
1930 17,952−3.8%
1940 17,9440.0%
1950 19,4428.3%
1960 20,0763.3%
1970 24,26620.9%
1980 29,40621.2%
1990 32,95312.1%
2000 35,9749.2%
2010 36,8212.4%
2020 37,3631.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790–1960 [7] 1900–1990 [8]
1990–2000 [9] 2010–2018 [10]

2000 census

At the 2000 census, [11] there were 35,974 people, 13,068 households and 9,108 families living in the county. The population density was 47 per square mile (18/km2). There were 15,312 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.86% White, 0.54% Black or African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.73% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 1.10% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.5% were of English, 12.7% American, 12.0% French, 10.8% French Canadian, 10.8% Irish and 6.7% German ancestry. 96.0% spoke English, 1.8% French and 1.2% Spanish as their first language.

There were 13,068 households, of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.40% were married couples living together, 8.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.30% were non-families. 23.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.02.

Age distribution was 24.90% under the age of 18, 12.50% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 11.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median household income was $43,142, and the median family income was $49,351. Males had a median income of $31,836 versus $24,416 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,539. About 5.10% of families and 8.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.10% of those under age 18 and 8.00% of those age 65 or over.

For historical populations since 1900, see Historical U.S. Census totals for Addison County, Vermont

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 36,821 people, 14,084 households, and 9,340 families living in the county. [12] The population density was 48.0 inhabitants per square mile (18.5/km2). There were 16,760 housing units at an average density of 21.9 per square mile (8.5/km2). [13] The racial makeup of the county was 95.3% white, 1.4% Asian, 0.8% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.9% of the population. [12] In terms of ancestry, 18.1% were English, 17.2% were Irish, 12.0% were German, 7.5% were American, 7.2% were French Canadian, 5.9% were Italian, and 5.3% were Scottish. [14]

Of the 14,084 households, 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.7% were non-families, and 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.88. The median age was 41.3 years. [12]

The median income for a household in the county was $55,800 and the median income for a family was $67,721. Males had a median income of $43,643 versus $34,486 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,599. About 5.7% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over. [15]

Politics

In 1828, the county voted for National Republican Party candidate John Quincy Adams.

In 1832, the county voted for Anti-Masonic Party candidate William Wirt.

From William Henry Harrison in 1836 to Winfield Scott in 1852, the state would vote the Whig Party candidates.

From John C. Frémont in 1856 to Richard Nixon in 1960, the Republican Party would have a 104-year winning streak in the county.

In 1964, the county was won by Democratic Party incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson, who became not only the first Democratic presidential candidate to win the county, but to win the state of Vermont entirely.

Following the Democrats victory in 1964, the county went back to voting for Republican candidates for another 16 year winning streak starting with Richard Nixon in 1968 and ending with Ronald Reagan in 1984, who became the last Republican presidential candidate to win the county.

In 1988, the county was won by Michael Dukakis and has been won by Democratic candidates ever since.

United States presidential election results for Addison County, Vermont [16]
Year Republican  /  Whig Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 6,29228.57%14,96767.96%7633.46%
2016 5,29727.83%11,21958.95%2,51513.22%
2012 5,20329.05%12,25768.44%4502.51%
2008 5,66729.46%13,20268.62%3691.92%
2004 7,07738.09%11,14760.00%3551.91%
2000 6,95339.90%8,93651.28%1,5388.83%
1996 4,79831.05%8,16452.83%2,49116.12%
1992 5,03429.57%8,09247.53%3,90022.91%
1988 6,77349.09%6,79149.22%2331.69%
1984 7,58958.26%5,29940.68%1371.05%
1980 5,21644.85%4,35137.41%2,06317.74%
1976 5,72656.52%4,16441.10%2412.38%
1972 6,46765.99%3,26233.29%710.72%
1968 5,00660.84%2,91435.42%3083.74%
1964 3,50042.38%4,75857.62%00.00%
1960 5,52065.03%2,96934.97%00.00%
1956 5,99078.22%1,66821.78%00.00%
1952 6,05778.18%1,66721.52%240.31%
1948 4,14870.68%1,61527.52%1061.81%
1944 4,09766.25%2,07933.62%80.13%
1940 4,50063.22%2,59336.43%250.35%
1936 5,16165.90%2,64633.79%240.31%
1932 5,29562.83%3,03135.96%1021.21%
1928 5,24772.09%2,00327.52%280.38%
1924 4,92787.68%5579.91%1352.40%
1920 4,51588.93%5039.91%591.16%
1916 2,76574.67%87423.60%641.73%
1912 1,83545.34%62115.34%1,59139.31%
1908 2,98684.42%44412.55%1073.03%
1904 3,14687.20%36610.14%962.66%
1900 3,28686.41%46712.28%501.31%
1896 4,31489.17%4048.35%1202.48%
1892 3,14680.73%62115.94%1303.34%
1888 4,03682.77%61812.67%2224.55%
1884 4,87885.85%60010.56%2043.59%
1880 3,84285.72%58513.05%551.23%
1876 3,78781.92%83518.06%10.02%
1872 3,58687.00%51712.54%190.46%
1868 3,67990.08%4059.92%00.00%
1864 3,54891.21%3428.79%00.00%
1860 2,41186.91%30210.89%612.20%
1856 3,08489.21%3068.85%671.94%
1852 1,84765.43%34112.08%63522.49%
1848 2,31965.20%2737.68%96527.13%

Education

Middlebury College is located in Addison County. Midd wiki 2.JPG
Middlebury College is located in Addison County.

Addison County has the following high schools:

Addison County is also home to two institutions of higher learning, Middlebury College and the Community College of Vermont, both located in Middlebury [17]

Transportation

Air

The Middlebury State Airport serves private aviation for Addison County. Commercial airlines are available to the north at Burlington International Airport in Chittenden County, and to the south at Rutland Southern Vermont Regional Airport in Rutland County.

Public transportation

Public bus service in Addison County is operated by Tri-Valley Transit (formerly ACTR). There is extensive bus service around Middlebury with connections to Vergennes, New Haven and Bristol, seasonal service to Middlebury Snow Bowl, as well as commuter buses to Burlington and Rutland operated in conjunction with Green Mountain Transit and the Marble Valley Regional Transit District, respectively. [18]

Although the majority of rides are provided through the Shuttle Bus System, ACTR also operates a Dial-A-Ride System. This system enhances ACTR's ability to provide comprehensive transportation alternatives for all Addison County residents. [19]

The Dial-A-Ride System includes programs that focus on specialized populations including elders, persons with disabilities, low-income families and individuals, as well as the visually impaired. Those eligible for Medicaid, Reach Up, are aged 60+ or with a disability may be eligible for free transportation. Nearly 40 Volunteer Drivers work with ACTR to provide these rides. Additional information about ACTR's transportation services are available at www.actr-vt.org. [20]

Amtrak's daily Ethan Allen Express train serves two stations in Addison County: Middlebury and Ferrisburgh–Vergennes. The train makes major stops in Burlington, Rutland, Albany, and New York City. Begun in July 2022, this is the first regular passenger rail route in the county since the Rutland Railroad discontinued service in 1953. [21]

Vermont Translines, an intercity bus carrier and interline partner with Greyhound and Amtrak, serves Addison County from Middlebury and Vergennes as well.

Major highways

Communities

City

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

Related Research Articles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bridport, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Bridport is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The town was founded October 9, 1761. The population was 1,225 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cornwall, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Cornwall is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. It was founded November 3, 1761. The population was 1,207 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ferrisburgh, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Ferrisburgh is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. It was founded June 24, 1762. The population was 2,646 at the 2020 census. The town is sometimes spelled Ferrisburg.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hancock, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Hancock is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The town was named for John Hancock. The population was 359 at the 2020 census. Hancock is home to the Middlebury College Snow Bowl and contains Middlebury Gap through the Green Mountains.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Leicester, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Leicester is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 990 at the 2020 census. Satans Kingdom is an unincorporated community located in Leicester.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New Haven, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

New Haven is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,683 at the 2020 census. In addition to the town center, New Haven contains the communities of Belden, Brooksville, New Haven Junction and New Haven Mills.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Orwell, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Orwell is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,239 at the 2020 census. Mount Independence was the largest fortification constructed by the American colonial forces. The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site is now one of Vermont's premier state-operated historic sites.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ripton, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Ripton is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 739 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Salisbury, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Salisbury is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,221 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Starksboro, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Starksboro is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,756 at the 2020 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Vergennes, Vermont</span> City in Vermont, United States

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Middlebury (CDP), Vermont</span> Census-designated place in Vermont, United States

Middlebury is the main settlement in the town of Middlebury in Addison County, Vermont, United States, and a census-designated place (CDP). The population was 7,304 at the 2020 census, out of a total population of 9,152 in the town of Middlebury. Most of the village is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Middlebury Village Historic District.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Addison, Vermont</span> Town in Vermont, United States

Addison is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. It was founded October 14, 1761. The population was 1,365 at the 2020 census.

References

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  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
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  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  13. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  14. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  15. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  17. Education in Addison County, Vermont. Addisoncounty.com. Retrieved on April 12, 2014.
  18. ACTR Bus Schedules & Maps, Addison County Transit Resources, Dec. 1, 2017.
  19. ACTR Dial-A-Ride, Addison County Transit Resources, Dec. 1, 2017.
  20. ACTR Bus Schedules & Maps brochure
  21. Lindsell, Robert M. (2000). The Rail Lines of Northern New England. Branch Line Press. pp. 35–46, 175. ISBN   0942147065.