Wolfdale (microprocessor)

Last updated
Wolfdale
Core 2 Duo E7500 2.93GHz.jpg
Core 2 Duo Wolfdale-3M E7500 2.93 GHz
General Info
Launched2008 H1
Discontinued2012
CPUID code1067x
Product codeWolfdale: 80570 Wolfdale-3M: 80571 Wolfdale-CL: 80588
Performance
Max. CPU clock rate 2500 MHz to 3500 MHz
FSB speeds800 MT/s to 1333 MT/s
Cache
L2 cacheWolfdale: 6 MB
Wolfdale-3M: 3 MB
Architecture and classification
ApplicationDesktop
Microarchitecture Penryn
Instruction set x86, x86-64
Physical specifications
Cores
  • 2
Socket(s)
Products, models, variants
Brand name(s)
History

Wolfdale is the code name for a processor from Intel that is sold in varying configurations as Core 2 Duo, Celeron, Pentium and Xeon. In Intel's Tick-Tock cycle, the 2007/2008 "Tick" was Penryn microarchitecture, the shrink of the Core microarchitecture to 45 nanometers as CPUID model 23. This replaced the Conroe processor with Wolfdale.

Intel American semiconductor chip manufacturer

Intel Corporation is an American multinational corporation and technology company headquartered in Santa Clara, California, in the Silicon Valley. It is the world's second largest and second highest valued semiconductor chip manufacturer based on revenue after being overtaken by Samsung Electronics, and is the inventor of the x86 series of microprocessors, the processors found in most personal computers (PCs). Intel ranked No. 46 in the 2018 Fortune 500 list of the largest United States corporations by total revenue. Intel is incorporated in Delaware.

Celeron is a brand name given by Intel to a number of different low-end IA-32 and x86-64 computer microprocessor models targeted at low-cost personal computers.

Pentium Dual-Core

The Pentium Dual-Core brand was used for mainstream x86-architecture microprocessors from Intel from 2006 to 2009 when it was renamed to Pentium. The processors are based on either the 32-bit Yonah or 64-bit Merom-2M, Allendale, and Wolfdale-3M core, targeted at mobile or desktop computers.

Contents

The Wolfdale chips come in four sizes, with 6 MB and 3 MB L2 cache (Core 2 Duo); the smaller version is commonly called Wolfdale-3M, 2 MB L2 (Pentium), and 1 MB L2 (Celeron).

The mobile version of Wolfdale is Penryn and the dual-socket server version is Wolfdale-DP. The Yorkfield desktop processor is a quad-core Multi-chip module of Wolfdale.

Penryn (microprocessor) Intel microprocessor

Penryn is the code name of a processor from Intel that is sold in varying configurations as Core 2 Solo, Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad, Pentium and Celeron.

Multi-chip module discrete electronic assembly containing multiple integrated circuits that behaves as a unit

A multi-chip module (MCM) is generically an electronic assembly where multiple integrated circuits, semiconductor dies and/or other discrete components are integrated, usually onto a unifying substrate, so that in use it can be treated as if it were a larger IC. Other terms, such as "hybrid" or "hybrid integrated circuit", also refer to MCMs. The individual ICs that make up an MCM are known as Chiplets. Intel and AMD are using MCMs to improve performance and reduce costs, as splitting a large monolithic IC into smaller chiplets allows for more ICs per wafer, and improved yield, as smaller dies have a reduced risk of getting destroyed by dust particles during semiconductor fabrication. Each chiplet is physically smaller than a conventional monolithic IC die,. An example of MCMs in use for mainstream CPUs is AMD's Zen 2 design.

Wolfdale was replaced by Nehalem based Clarkdale and its Sandy Bridge successor.

Nehalem (microarchitecture) Intel processor microarchitecture

Nehalem is the codename for an Intel processor microarchitecture released in November 2008. Nehalem was used in the first generation of the Intel Core processors. Nehalem is the successor to the older Core microarchitecture.

Clarkdale is the code name for an Intel processor, initially sold as desktop Intel Core i5 and Core i3 and Pentium. It is closely related to the mobile Arrandale processor; both use dual-core dies based on the Westmere 32 nm die shrink of the Nehalem microarchitecture, and have integrated Graphics as well as PCI Express and DMI links.

Sandy Bridge Intel processor microarchitecture

Sandy Bridge is the codename for the microarchitecture used in the "second generation" of the Intel Core processors - the Sandy Bridge microarchitecture is the successor to Nehalem microarchitecture. Intel demonstrated a Sandy Bridge processor in 2009, and released first products based on the architecture in January 2011 under the Core brand.

Variants

ProcessorBrand NameModel (list)CoresL2 CacheSocketTDP
Wolfdale-3M
Celeron E3xxx 21 MB LGA 775 65 W
Pentium E2210
E5xxx 2 MB
E6xxx
Core 2 Duo E7xxx 3 MB
Wolfdale E8xxx 6 MB
Xeon 31x0 45-65 W
Wolfdale-CL 30x4 1 LGA 771 30 W
31x3 265 W

Wolfdale

Wolfdale is the codename for the E8000 series of Core 2 Duo desktop processors and the Xeon 3100 server processor family. Released on January 20, 2008, the chips are manufactured using a 45-nanometer process and feature two processor cores. The Wolfdale models operate at 2.53 GHz, 2.66 GHz, 2.83 GHz, 3.0 GHz, 3.16 GHz, 3.33 GHz, and 3.5 GHz (unreleased Core 2 Duo E8700); the E31x0 and E8xxx series utilizes 6 MB of L2 cache and a 1333 MT/s FSB. These processors include the SSE4.1 media extensions. Wolfdale uses a product code 80570. [1] [2] [3]

SSE4 is a SIMD CPU instruction set used in the Intel Core microarchitecture and AMD K10 (K8L). It was announced on September 27, 2006, at the Fall 2006 Intel Developer Forum, with vague details in a white paper; more precise details of 47 instructions became available at the Spring 2007 Intel Developer Forum in Beijing, in the presentation. SSE4 is fully compatible with software written for previous generations of Intel 64 and IA-32 architecture microprocessors. All existing software continues to run correctly without modification on microprocessors that incorporate SSE4, as well as in the presence of existing and new applications that incorporate SSE4.

Wolfdale-3M

Wolfdale-3M is the logical successor of Allendale and uses the 82 mm² dies with 3 MB L2 cache similar to Penryn-3M; its product code is 80571. It is used in the Core 2 E7xxx series as well as the E5xxx/E6xxx Pentium Dual-Core and E3xxx Celeron processors. The E5xxx enables only 2 MB of L2 cache, replacing the E2xxx series of Pentium Dual core chips; the E7xxx series uses the full 3 MB of L2 Cache, and a 1066MT/s FSB, replacing the Core 2 Duo E4xxx series; and the Celeron E3xxx series with 1 MB L2 cache enabled is the follow-on to the Celeron E1xxx series.

Wolfdale-DP

Wolfdale-CL

The Xeon L3014 and E3113 processors are Wolfdale-CL with product code 80588, in an LGA 771 package. L3014 has only one core, 3 MB L2 cache and it does not support Intel VT-x, while E3113 is identical to E3110 except that the former fits in an LGA771 socket while the latter fits in LGA775. Both E3113 and E3110 clock to 3Ghz on a 1333Mhz FSB. The Xeon L3014 and E3113 processors do not fit in LGA 775 based mainboards used by mainstream desktop processors but are typically used in single-socket LGA 771 blade servers that otherwise require the more expensive DP server processors. Wolfdale-CL follows an earlier Conroe-CL processor, and Yorkfield-CL is the respective Quad-Core version of Wolfdale-CL.

LGA 771

LGA 771, also known as Socket J, is a CPU interface introduced by Intel in 2006. It is used in Intel Core microarchitecture and NetBurst microarchitecture(Dempsey) based DP-capable server processors, the Dual-Core Xeon is codenamed Dempsey, Woodcrest, and Wolfdale and the Quad-Core processors Clovertown, Harpertown, and Yorkfield-CL. It is also used for the Core 2 Extreme QX9775.

Successor

Wolfdale was replaced by the 45 nm Nehalem processor.

See also

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In Intel's Tick-Tock cycle, the 2007/2008 "Tick" was the shrink of the Core microarchitecture to 45 nanometers as CPUID model 23. In Core 2 processors, it is used with the code names Penryn, Wolfdale and Yorkfield, some of which are also sold as Celeron, Pentium and Xeon processors. In the Xeon brand, the Wolfdale-DP and Harpertown code names are used for LGA 771 based MCMs with two or four active Wolfdale cores.

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References

  1. Intel - Products (Formerly Wolfdale)
  2. Intel - Processors (Formerly Wolfdale)
  3. Intel - SSPEC/QDF Reference