Franklin Park (Columbus, Ohio)

Last updated
Franklin Park
Fpsouth1.JPG
Homes along Franklin Park South
Franklin Park (Columbus, Ohio)
Interactive map of the neighborhood
Coordinates: 39°57′49″N82°57′36″W / 39.963517°N 82.959941°W / 39.963517; -82.959941 Coordinates: 39°57′49″N82°57′36″W / 39.963517°N 82.959941°W / 39.963517; -82.959941
Population
 (2010)
  Total2,112
Time zone Eastern
ZIP Code
43205
Area code 614
Website Franklin Park Civic Association

Franklin Park is a neighborhood located on the Near East Side of Columbus, Ohio. Both the historic neighborhood and landmark, the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, are named after the 88-acre park.

Contents

History

This property atlas from 1899 shows the Franklin Park and Woodland Park areas. The grey overlays represent currently existing structures, and the coral overlays represent currently existing streets. The original area known as Franklin Park Place can be seen, as well as the non-extant racetrack within the park. Baist's Property Atlas of Franklin Park Area.pdf
This property atlas from 1899 shows the Franklin Park and Woodland Park areas. The grey overlays represent currently existing structures, and the coral overlays represent currently existing streets. The original area known as Franklin Park Place can be seen, as well as the non-extant racetrack within the park.

Development in Franklin Park began in the 1850s and continued through the 1880s. [1] The neighborhood was home to the Franklin County Fairgrounds for 30 years before it became the recreational park that it is today. [2]

The first known residential area of Columbus lies within the present day neighborhood. The small addition, consisting of three to six blocks, was referred to as "Franklin Park Place". The borders were Franklin Park South (known as Fair Ave) to the north, Bryden Road to the south, the train tracks to the east, and Fairwood Avenue to the west. As one can see from the source, the Franklin Park area consisted of many different subdivisions and additions whose names eventually merged as "Franklin Park." [3]

The development of Franklin Park brought in both the working class and the wealthy. [4] The neighborhood is a mix of both larger mansions and smaller, modest homes. The 1930s were a transitional zone between the fast-paced city life of downtown and the countryside beyond Alum Creek. Up to the 1940s, the streetcar became more common followed by people typically owning their own automobiles. [5] As this became a popular commodity, people would take their Sunday drives on the 1.2 mile loop that circles Franklin park. Not only was Franklin Park a community neighborhood, but people would also come to Franklin Park to drive for leisure, race their automobiles, and picnic with their families. [6]

Geography

The influence of the park and conservatory in the neighborhood, as seen here in someone's front yard along Franklin Park South. Fpgarden.JPG
The influence of the park and conservatory in the neighborhood, as seen here in someone's front yard along Franklin Park South.

This neighborhood is bounded by East Broad Street to the north, East Main Street to the south, and Wilson Avenue to the west. [7]

The Alum Creek tributary separates the Franklin Park neighborhood from the City of Bexley and the area originally known as the "Wolfe Addition to Franklin Park," which is known in modern times as the Wolfe Park neighborhood.

Franklin Park is surrounded on the north by the other Near East neighborhoods of Eastgate, Nelson Park, Woodland Park, Eastwood Heights, and Bronzeville/King-Lincoln. To the south are Hanford Village, Driving Park, and Old Oaks, which are both considered to be Columbus' Near South. Olde Towne East is another Near East Side neighborhood that is situated between the Discovery and Market Districts of downtown Columbus and the Franklin Park neighborhood. A Google Map shows the general location of the Neighborhoods of Columbus' Near East and Near South neighborhoods (without boundaries depicted). [8]

The contemporary boundaries of Franklin Park have been disputed since the early 2000s and vary depending on the source. The general consensus would include the boundaries of Broad Street to the north, Main Street to the south, and Alum Creek to the east. [9] [10] The neighborhood's boundary to the west tends to be disputed with Olde Towne East. While some sources claim the boundary between the two neighborhoods to be Wilson Ave, [11] other sources claim Olde Towne East follows a staggered boundary past Wilson Ave. [12]

The Bryden Road Historic District bisects both Franklin Park and Olde Towne East. [13] Franklin Park is primarily zoned residential. Franklin Park includes many single family homes, with duplexes, row-houses, and apartment buildings. There are small pockets of the neighborhood zoned for institutional and commercial uses. These occur primarily along E Main St and Kelton Ave. In addition, the far southeast corner of the neighborhood, known as the Holtzman-Main business corridor situated along the Alum Creek tributary, is completely zoned for industrial and commercial zones. [14]

Demographics

According to Onboard Informatics, the median age in Franklin Park is 34 years old and the median household income is $22,820. [15] The largest portion of demographics in Franklin Park are single parents. [16]

A good amount of Franklin Park's population are long term residents, residing in Franklin Park for at least 5 years. [17]

Civic engagement

The Franklin Park Civic Association is the oldest organization in the Near East, with formal corporate representation for the Franklin Park neighborhood that is well-documented by articles of incorporation filed with office of the Ohio Secretary of State. Initially, the organization included boundaries that covered most of the territory that comprises the Near East Side!

On April 15, 1965, the Franklin Park Area Council (the neighborhood's earliest registered corporation) was recorded as a nonprofit corporation in the State of Ohio. The first president was Margaret E. Day, with Coleridge O. Jones, Jr., and Napoleon A. Bell being the other corporation officers.

The second corporation was founded in 1974 as the Franklin Park Area Improvement Association, and in 1997 was renamed as the Franklin Park Area Association.

Ted Brown, Secretary of State, certified the formation of the Franklin Park Area Improvement Association as a community improvement corporation in the State of Ohio. The filings were submitted on February 28, 1974 by William H. Stewart (Chairman) and Albert A. Copeland (Statutory Agent), with other trustees being Louise R. Jones, James C. Shivers, and Robert E. Short who met at 1885 Bryden Road to form the corporation.

At the September 25, 2012 meeting of the Association, the General Membership unanimously ratified a change of name to the Franklin Park Civic Association, Inc. Amended articles of incorporation were filed and recorded with the Ohio Secretary of State in April 2013.

Jingle Mingle (now known as the Mingle)

The Jingle Mingle was the annual holiday celebration of the Franklin Park Civic Association. Held in the John F. Wolfe Palm House of the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, the 2012-2014 events were co-hosted with the Olde Town East Neighborhood Association (OTENA) [18] Prior to 2017, the event has taken place in early December and has traditionally been a neighborhood holiday potluck. [19] Although FPCA began using "The Jingle Mingle" term in 2012, the civic association has hosted an early December neighborhood gathering at the Franklin Park Conservatory for many years. During the renovations of the Conservatory to host Ameriflora '92, the holiday event was held at East High School. Since 2019, The Association has held the Jingle Mingle in early January, alleviating conflicts with the most hectic time of the holiday party season.

Since 2011, and now concurrent to the Jingle Mingle, the Franklin Park Civic Association conducts an annual Holiday Raffle and Silent Auction, which are fundraising events for the organization. The December 13, 2015 Jingle Mingle hosted a diverse group of approximately 160 guests from across all of the neighborhoods of Columbus' Near East Side. In addition to gathering to celebrate community and the holidays, drives for the needy are included. Since 2015, the "Socks Wear Out" drive has encouraged attendees to donate personal care items and toiletries, with a special focus to bring new packages of socks as the item most quickly worn out by the homeless.

In 2022, The Mingle was held on the Community Garden Campus in Franklin Park. Pictures and the program from this event can be found on the website of the Franklin Park Civic Association.

Education and schools

A+ Arts Academy is a private charter school which opened at 1395 Fair Avenue in the historic building previously known as Fair Avenue Alternative Elementary School and in the late 19th and early 20th Century as Fair Avenue Public School.

Columbus City Preparatory School for Girls, formerly known as Franklin Alternative Junior High School as well as Franklin Junior High School, is located on a parcel sitting between Bryden Road and Oak Street with a present-day address of 1390 Bryden Road. Another Building known previously as the Theresa Dowd School, as well as Franklin Junior High School, is also situated on the modern day address however, that building fronts Oak Street on the north. That building is currently used only as storage.

Historically, two notable Columbus Schools had original locations within what in the present day is known as the Franklin Park neighborhood. East High School was originally located on the site known in the present as 1390 Bryden Road. The original school was razed to build an earlier incarnation of Franklin Junior High School at 1390 Franklin Avenue. That building was razed to build the present day modernist structure (circa 1970) now ridiculed by many as out of character with the historic structures of the surrounding community.

The other notable school with early beginnings in the present day Franklin Park neighborhood is Columbus Academy. The school sat along the Alum Creek tributary at Franklin Park South and Nelson Road. The building was destroyed by fire in the early 1980s after opening at its new location in Gahanna, Ohio.

The neighborhood is currently in the East High School attendance area in the Columbus City Schools District.

Recreation and parks

Franklin Park

An Ohio historical marker near the Asian garden in Franklin Park, commemorating Asian-Americans serving in the Civil War. Asiansincivilwarmarker.JPG
An Ohio historical marker near the Asian garden in Franklin Park, commemorating Asian-Americans serving in the Civil War.

Franklin Park is a landmark for both the neighborhood and the Near East Side. The park encompasses 88 acres filled with several ponds, an amphitheater, terraced waterfalls, a community garden, an Asian-themed garden, a picnic shelter, and playgrounds. The Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens also lies within the park, a landmark of the neighborhood and the City of Columbus. Franklin Park is home to twenty one cherry trees gifted from Japan to represent Japanese community of Columbus, Ohio. Twenty of the trees are being kept inside the conservatory's greenhouse before being transplanted outside. The remaining older tree was planted along one of the lakes in Franklin Park on April 27, 2012. The occasion marked the 100 year anniversary of the original Japanese gift, thousands of cherry blossom trees sent from Tokyo to Washington, D.C. “Honda is one of the most-important employers in central Ohio, so there’s a strong connection with Japan,” said Bruce Harkey, a former Honda employee and the Franklin Park Conservatory's executive director. [20]

Rainbow Park

The lot commonly known as "Rainbow Park" is located on the southeast corner of Oak Street and Kelton Avenue. The parcel (010-138164) is zoned R3, H35 (residential) [21] and is private property. Prior to 2002, the property was owned by Columbus & Southern Ohio Electric Company. [22]

Playgrounds

Franklin Park and the Kwanzaa Playground at English Park.

Religion

Franklin Park is home to a variety of churches, temples, and mosques. The following is a list of a few of the neighborhood's places of worship:

Settlement houses and social services

Nationwide Children's Hospital (formerly Columbus Children's Hospital) was established in the 1880s located at the Corner of Franklin Park West/Miller Avenue and Franklin Park South/Fair Avenue. [25] The location is now the site of the Park Plaza apartments.

Structures and landmarks

Cleo Dumaree Recreational Center

Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Franklin Park Conservatory greenhouses and grounds Franklin Park Conservatory, Columbus, OH.jpg
Franklin Park Conservatory greenhouses and grounds

The Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens is a landmark structure on the National Register of Historic Places. It is situated on the 88-acre Franklin Park just two miles east of downtown Columbus. Built in 1895, the original conservatory stills stands after many expansions to the site. It is now called the John F. Wolfe Palm House, and houses 43 species of palms from around the world. The Fiddle-leaf Fig in the palm house is one of the oldest remaining plants in the conservatory. [26] Architect J.M. Freese was inspired to build the Victorian greenhouse after the success of the Chicago World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. [27] He drew inspiration from the City Beautiful movement and also from London's Crystal Palace, taking after its ornate, Victorian style. [28]

In the 1930s, the Wolfe Family, better known as the owners of The Columbus Dispatch, bought exotic animals for the Columbus Zoo. The original site of the zoo was located in Clintonville, within the old Olentangy Park along the Olentangy River. Structures to hold these animals were not quite ready when the Wolfe Family had purchased the exotic animals, so they were temporarily held at the conservatory. To this day, on some of the windows of the Palm House, one can still see the remains of bars on the windows where the animals were once held. [29]

Franklin Park and the Conservatory became the host site for AmeriFlora '92, a six-month international horticulture exposition. [30] Renovation of the historic Palm House and a $14-million expansion began in 1989. The additions totaled 58,000 square feet and included expanded plant collections, classrooms, a library, gift shop, café, and administrative offices. After Ameriflora Ohio Legislature created the Franklin Park Conservatory Joint Recreation District to uphold management of the conservatory and surrounding acres by a new 10-member board of trustees and an executive director. [31]

Trolley District

Former west car barn under renovation to hold the new East Market, 2021 New East Market.jpg
Former west car barn under renovation to hold the new East Market, 2021

The landmark complex of historic buildings making up the Trolley District are situated at the heart of the Franklin Park neighborhood on more than 3 acres. The site includes the East Market food hall and marketplace, as well as several bars and other planned businesses. The six brick buildings at the trolley-barn site were built between 1880 and 1920. [32]

The landmark was purchased in 2014 by a developer with plans for a mixed use facility in the future preserving the historic structures of the complex). [33] In 2014, the tracks from the maintenance shop to Oak Street still remained; however, they were removed by the owner of the property to safeguard their preservation.

Royal York Apartments

The sign for the modernist apartment complex, the Royal York Apartments. Royal York Apartments, Columbus, OH (lawn sign).jpg
The sign for the modernist apartment complex, the Royal York Apartments.

The 1920s Art Deco style apartments were built in 1937 by architect Howard Dwight Smith who is well known for his designs of the Ohio Stadium. [34] This eight story Modernist apartment building is the tallest building in the neighborhood.

Dining

Considering Franklin Park is historically a neighborhood consisting of mostly residential, there are only a few restaurants or fast food chains located in the area. Located in the Conservatory is the Garden Café. [35]

Entertainment

Asian Festival

Despite the low concentration of Asian residents, [36] the Franklin Park area hosts several attractions tied to the culture of Asian countries and history of Asian-Americans. The neighborhood and park have been home to the annual 'Asian Festival' since 1995. The festival attracts over 100,000 people from around Columbus, the state of Ohio, and beyond. [37]

Historic house tours

Although homes in the Franklin Park neighborhood had been included in the Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association (OTENA) Tour of Historic Homes before, [38] in 2013, OTENA invited the Franklin Park Civic Association to endorse a showcase of their neighborhood by presenting the first Summer Tour of Historic Homes to feature homes exclusively located outside of their neighborhood. The entire tour was devoted to the homes fronting 88 acre Franklin Park and the Conservatory. [39] The tour began on the grounds of the Franklin Park Conservatory in the_Scotts_Miracle-Gro Community Garden Campus, with the first stop being the recently restored "Caretaker's Cottage". [40] In addition to serving as a neighborhood resource center and meeting space, the Caretaker's Cottage is home to the American Community Gardening Association. As followup to the Tour, it was revealed that the 2013 Tour of Historic Homes had been the most highly attended tour to date.

In 2018, the Olde Towne East Tour of Historic Homes returned to the Franklin Park neighborhood, this time going further into the neighborhood, unlike the 2013 Tour, which was devoted to homes that were directly across from Franklin Park.

All proceeds of the 2013 and 2018 OTENA Tour of Historic Homes went to the benefit of the Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association (OTENA).

Transportation

Franklin Park was home of the Columbus Railway, Power and Light Co. in 1904. [41] From 1888 to 1948, an experimental electric streetcar ran from Chittenden Avenue to the Fairgrounds that were once located in Franklin Park. [42] This was the beginning of public transportation. In 2009, there was a proposed plan to bring a modern version of the Columbus Streetcar back.

Today, COTA (Central Ohio Transit Authority) operates three bus routes through the Franklin Park area. Route 2 runs along E Main St, Route 10 runs along E Broad St, and Route 11 runs along Bryden Rd. [43]

The Alum Creek Multi-use Trail or The Ohio to Erie Trail is an important trail that runs through Franklin Park. This trail travels along one of the city's river corridors. [44]

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Columbus, Ohio</span> Capital and largest city of Ohio, United States

Columbus is the state capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Ohio. With a 2020 census population of 905,748, it is the 14th-most populous city in the U.S., the second-most populous city in the Midwest, after Chicago, and the third-most populous state capital. Columbus is the county seat of Franklin County; it also extends into Delaware and Fairfield counties. It is the core city of the Columbus metropolitan area, which encompasses ten counties in central Ohio. The metropolitan area had a population of 2,138,926 in 2020, making it the largest entirely in Ohio and 32nd-largest in the U.S.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Franklin Park Conservatory</span> Botanical garden in Columbus, Ohio

Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens is a botanical garden and conservatory located in Columbus, Ohio. It is open daily and an admission fee is charged. Today, it is a horticultural and educational institution showcasing exotic plant collections, special exhibitions, and Dale Chihuly artworks.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Westgate (Columbus, Ohio)</span> Neighborhood of Columbus in Franklin, Ohio, United States

Westgate is a community within the Hilltop area of Columbus, Ohio. It was partially constructed on land that formerly housed the American Civil War Camp Chase and a Confederate prison. After the Civil War, the land was purchased by Joseph Binns and his associates with the intent to start a Quaker community. These plans failed to materialize and the land was developed as a "streetcar suburb" in the 1920s. Located 4 miles (6.4 km) west of downtown, the neighborhood is home to Westgate Park and Recreation Center, Westgate Alternative Elementary School, St. Mary Magdalene Church and school, and Parkview United Methodist Church. 4,500 residents live within the Westgate boundaries, most in single family houses.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Franklinton (Columbus, Ohio)</span> Neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio

Franklinton is a neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio, just west of its downtown. Settled in 1797, Franklinton is the first American settlement in Franklin County, and was the county seat until 1824. As the city of Columbus grew, the city annexed and incorporated the existing settlement in 1859. Franklinton is bordered by the Scioto River on the north and east, Harmon Avenue on the east, Stimmel Road and Greenlawn Avenue on the south, and Interstate 70 on the west. Its main thoroughfare is West Broad Street, one of the city's two main roads.

The Near East Side is a neighborhood located near downtown Columbus, Ohio, made up of several neighborhoods: Mount Vernon, King-Lincoln Bronzeville, Eastgate, Franklin Park, Nelson Park, Olde Towne East, and Woodland Park.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Downtown Columbus, Ohio</span> Neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio

Downtown Columbus is the central business district of Columbus, Ohio. Downtown is centered on the intersection of Broad and High Streets, and encompasses all of the area inside the Inner Belt. Downtown is home to most of the tallest buildings in Columbus.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Olde Towne East</span> Neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio, United States

Olde Towne East is a neighborhood located in the historical Near East Side of Columbus, Ohio and is one of Columbus' oldest neighborhoods. The area has over 1,000 homes, some as old as the 1830s, and more than 50 architectural styles as a result of its history. These homes were built by many of the famous individuals of Columbus including industrialists, lawyers, judges, teachers, architects, mayors, governors, and legislators, many of whom shaped the city.

Columbus, the state capital and Ohio's largest city, has numerous neighborhoods within its city limits. Neighborhood names and boundaries are not officially defined. They may vary or change from time to time due to demographic and economic variables.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Driving Park</span> Neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio, U.S.

Driving Park is an urban residential area on the Near East Side of Columbus, Ohio just south of Interstate 70. Mainly a middle-class, predominantly African American neighborhood, Driving Park and its surrounding neighborhoods consist of an area of 17,730 residents. Driving Park received its name from its historic past as a large racing complex, first for horses and later for automobiles.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Old Oaks Historic District</span> Neighborhood in Columbus in Franklin, Ohio, United States

Old Oaks Historic District, or Old Oaks, is a neighborhood just south and east of downtown Columbus, Ohio and is an example of a streetcar suburb in the city.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Old North Columbus</span> Neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio

Old North Columbus is a neighborhood located just north of the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. It was founded in 1847 where, at the time, it was a stand-alone city out of the confines of Columbus until it was incorporated into the City of Columbus in 1871. In its early years the city was a popular stagecoach stop with people traveling from Worthington to Columbus. Today Old North Columbus is popular for its local music and its unique "untouched architecture" which is reminiscent of its old roots.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">King-Lincoln Bronzeville</span> Neighborhood in Columbus, Ohio

King-Lincoln is in Columbus, Ohio and as a re-evolving, diversifying neighborhood is the site of revitalization and renovation projects by public and private investors and partnerships. Originally known as Bronzeville by the residents of the community, it was renamed the King-Lincoln District by Mayor Michael B. Coleman's administration to highlight the historical significance of the district's King Arts Complex and Lincoln Theatre.

The culture of Columbus, Ohio, is particularly known for museums, performing arts, sporting events, seasonal fairs and festivals, and architecture of various styles from Greek Revival to modern architecture.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Woodland Park (Columbus, Ohio)</span> Neighborhood of Columbus in Franklin, Ohio, United States

Woodland Park is a residential neighborhood located in the Near East Side of Columbus, Ohio that houses approximately 1,500 residents. The neighborhood was previously home to such figures as artist Emerson Burkhart, cartoonist Billy Ireland, and judge William Brooks. Established in the early 20th century, Woodland Park has grown from its planned neighborhood roots into a modest neighborhood that contains various faith communities, schools, sources of entertainment and recreation, and borders an extension of the Ohio State University medical center.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Southern Orchards</span> Place

Southern Orchards is an established neighborhood on the near south side of Columbus, Ohio. It is located immediately southeast of downtown and is the 23rd most walkable neighborhood in Columbus with 3,538 residents. The neighborhood is the target of revitalization and beautification largely due to its anchor institution Nationwide Children's Hospital and a renewed interest in urban living in the city's core. Since 2008, more than 90 properties have been improved through the hospital’s Healthy Homes program and continued revitalization is occurring along the major streets of Livingston and Parsons Avenues as the city moves to reconnect downtown to its surrounding neighborhoods.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">W.H. Jones Mansion</span> United States historic place

The W. H. Jones Mansion was built in 1889 at 731 East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio as the residence of dry goods store owner William H. Jones and his wife Josephine. The original cost to build it was $11,250. He lived there until 1923. Jones modelled the house after another mansion in Barnesville, Ohio. The Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association successfully prevented it from being demolished to make way for a Long John Silver's restaurant. The home is an example of Queen Anne style architecture, with a corner turret, third story ballroom and a carriage house in the rear. Its foundation is high ashlar stone, its roof is slate, and the main body of the building is made of red pressed brick.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Franklin Park (Columbus park)</span> Park in Columbus, Ohio, U.S.

Franklin Park is a public park in Columbus, Ohio, United States. It is the namesake of Franklin Park, its containing neighborhood in Columbus. The park is a landmark for both the neighborhood and the Near East Side. The park encompasses 88 acres (36 ha) filled with several ponds, an amphitheater, terraced waterfalls, a community garden, an Asian-themed garden, a picnic shelter, and playgrounds. The Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens also lie within the park, a landmark of the neighborhood and the City of Columbus. Franklin Park is home to twenty one cherry trees gifted from Japan to represent Japanese community of Columbus, Ohio. Twenty of the trees are being kept inside the conservatory's greenhouse before being transplanted outside. The remaining older tree was planted along one of the lakes in Franklin Park on April 27, 2012. The occasion marked the 100 year anniversary of the original Japanese gift, thousands of cherry blossom trees sent from Tokyo to Washington, D.C. "Honda is one of the most-important employers in central Ohio, so there's a strong connection with Japan," said Bruce Harkey, a former Honda employee and the Franklin Park Conservatory's executive director.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Columbus Near East Side District</span> Historic district in Ohio, United States

The Columbus Near East Side District is a historic district in the Near East Side of Columbus, Ohio. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. A portion of the district, the Bryden Road District, was added to the Columbus Register of Historic Properties in 1990. An addition, the Columbus Near East Side Historic District-Parsons Avenue, was added to the register in 1983.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Avery Pontiac Building</span> Historic building in Columbus, Ohio

The Avery Pontiac Building is a historic building in Columbus, Ohio. It is located in Columbus's Near East Side, roughly between the Franklin Park and Olde Towne East neighborhoods. The building was added to the Columbus Near East Side District in 1978. It was individually listed on the Columbus Register of Historic Properties in 1984.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles Frederick Myers house</span> Historic house in Columbus, Ohio

The Charles Frederick Myers house is a historic private residence in the Franklin Park neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio. The house was built in 1896 in an eclectic style. It was added to the Columbus Near East Side District in 1978, and the Bryden Road District in 1990.

References

  1. "Columbus Neighborhoods: Olde Towne East". WOSU Public Media.
  2. "Franklin Park". The City of Columbus. The City of Columbus. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  3. "Baist's property atlas of the city of Columbus and vicinity Ohio 1899, plate 22 (GeoPDF and GeoTIFF)". Ohio Wesleyan University Digital Collection. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  4. "Franklin Park Neighborhood, Columbus Ohio". Franklin Park Civic Association. Franklin Park Civic Association. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  5. "Columbus Neighborhoods: Olde Towne East". WOSU Public Media.
  6. "Columbus Neighborhoods: Olde Towne East". WOSU Public Media.
  7. Our Neighborhood Google Map https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zRsoEQJGJ6a0.k_RT9oOYpA6A
  8. Near East neighborhoods google map with other nearby neighborhoods shown
  9. "Franklin Park: About This Neighborhood". Columbus Neighborhoods. Retrieved 9 December 2014.
  10. Ferenchik, Mark. "Neighbors find living near Franklin Park irresistible". Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  11. "Franklin Park: About This Neighborhood". Columbus Neighborhoods. Retrieved 9 December 2014.
  12. "Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association". Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association. Archived from the original on 26 August 2015. Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  13. "Historic Districts" (PDF). The City of Columbus. Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  14. "Columbus One Stop Shop Zoning". GIS Maps, Columbus.gov. The City of Columbus. Archived from the original on 20 December 2014. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  15. "Franklin Park Demographics". Point 2 Homes. Onboard Informatics. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  16. "Franklin Park, Columbus OH Lifestyle and Demographics". Realtor.com. Realtor.com . Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  17. "Franklin Park, Columbus OH Lifestyle and Demographics". Realtor.com. Realtor.com . Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  18. "Olde Towne East Home Page". Olde Towne East. Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  19. "Jingle Mingle". Franklin Park Civic Association. Franklin Park Civic Association. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  20. "Columbus Dispatch". Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved December 2, 2014.
  21. https://www.columbus.gov/bzs/online-services/Online-Zoning-Map/ Columbus, Ohio Building and Zoning Services
  22. Historic parcel sheet records of the Franklin County (Ohio) Auditor.
  23. "Meredith Temple Church of God in Christ". Meredith Temple Church of God in Christ. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  24. "Welcome". Gospel Lighthouse Church. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  25. "Central Ohio Activism". 13 December 2017.
  26. "Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens". Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  27. "Palm House". Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  28. "Franklin Park & Conservatory". Landscape Voice. Landscape Voice. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  29. "Columbus Neighborhoods: Olde Towne East". WOSU Public Media.
  30. "History". Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. The City of Columbus. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  31. "History". Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  32. Ferenchik, Mark. "Real-estate broker buys old trolley-barn buildings". The Columbus Dispatch. The Dispatch Printing Company. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  33. "Ideas Sought for Franklin Park Trolley Barn Project". Columbus Underground. 31 August 2010. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  34. "Smith, Howard Dwight". Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture Digital Library. The Ohio State University. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  35. "Garden Café". Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  36. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved December 2, 2014.
  37. "Asian Festival". Asian Festival. Retrieved December 2, 2014.
  38. Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association, Tour of Historic Homes and Holiday Tour of Historic Homes booklets (2011, 2010, 2007, 2006).
  39. "Tour of Homes". Olde Towne East. Olde Towne East Neighborhood Association. Archived from the original on 16 December 2014. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  40. "Homes with Franklin Park View to Star in Olde Towne East Tour". The Columbus Dispatch: Garden Section. The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  41. "Endangered No. 10 – Columbus Railway Power & Light Co Building". Columbus Landmarks. Columbus Landmarks Foundation. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  42. Campbell, Alex. "Streetcars". Columbus Railroads. Columbus Railroads. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  43. "Maps". Central Ohio Transit Agency. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  44. "The Ohio to Erie Trail". The Ohio to Erie Trail. The Ohio to Erie Trail, Org. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  45. Historical parcel sheets for property transfers. Franklin County Auditor.