Governorate of New Toledo

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Governorate of New Toledo

Gobernación de Nueva Toledo
1529–1542
Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg
Mapa de America del Sur (Gobernaciones 1534-1539).svg
Spanish map of the administrative division of New Castile and New Toledo made in 1535
Status Spanish colony
Capital Cuzco (Claimed by Diego de Almagro)
Official languages Spanish ( de facto )
Religion
Roman Catholicism
GovernmentMonarchy
King  
 1516–1556
Charles I
Governor  
 1529–1538
Diego de Almagro
Historical era Spanish Empire
1529
1542
CurrencyEscudo
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Blank.png Inca Empire
Blank.png Indigenous peoples of the Americas
Viceroyalty of Peru Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg

The Spanish Imperial Governorate of New Toledo was formed from the previous southern half of the Inca Empire, stretching south into present day central Chile, and east into present day central Brazil.

Established by King Charles I of Spain in 1528. Diego de Almagro was the appointed Spanish colonial governor.

It was replaced by the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru in 1542.

Governorates in Peruvian region

After the first territorial division of South America between Spain and Portugal, the Peruvian colonial administration was divided into four entities:

This territorial division set the basis for the colonial administration of South America for several decades. It was formally dissolved in 1544, when King Charles I sent his personal envoy, Blasco Núñez Vela, to govern the newly founded Viceroyalty of Peru that replaced the governorates.

See also

Coordinates: 12°02′36″S77°01′42″W / 12.04333°S 77.02833°W / -12.04333; -77.02833

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