Thomas River

Last updated

Thomas
Location
Country Australia
State Western Australia
Region Gascoyne
Physical characteristics
SourceTeano Range
 - locationsouth of Double Peak
 - coordinates 24°38′16″S117°10′13″E / 24.63778°S 117.17028°E / -24.63778; 117.17028
 - elevation463 m (1,519 ft)
Mouth confluence with the Gascoyne River
 - location
near Landor Station homestead
 - coordinates
24°43′33″S116°15′2″E / 24.72583°S 116.25056°E / -24.72583; 116.25056 Coordinates: 24°43′33″S116°15′2″E / 24.72583°S 116.25056°E / -24.72583; 116.25056
 - elevation
294 m (965 ft)
Length127 km (79 mi)
Discharge 
 - location mouth
Basin features
River system Gascoyne River catchment
[1]

The Thomas River is a river in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia.

River Natural flowing watercourse

A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features, although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek, but not always: the language is vague.

Gascoyne region of Western Australia

The Gascoyne region is one of the nine administrative regions of Western Australia. It is located in the north west of Western Australia, and consists of the local government areas of Carnarvon, Exmouth, Shark Bay and Upper Gascoyne. The Gascoyne has about 600 km (370 mi) of Indian Ocean coastline; extends inland about 500 km (310 mi); and has an area of 138,000 km2 (53,000 sq mi), including islands.

Western Australia state in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

The headwaters of the river rise south of Double Peak and flows westwards, joined by two minor tributaries; Coondoondoo Creek and Pink Hills Creek. The river forms its confluence with the Gascoyne River near the Police Station Woolshed. The Thomas flows through the Murrumburra Pool on its way to the Gascoyne. The river descends 169 metres (554 ft) over its 127-kilometre (79 mi) course. [1]

Tributary stream or river that flows into a main stem river or lake

A tributary or affluent is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem river or a lake. A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean. Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean.

Confluence Meeting of two or more bodies of flowing water

In geography, a confluence occurs where two or more flowing bodies of water join together to form a single channel. A confluence can occur in several configurations: at the point where a tributary joins a larger river ; or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name ; or where two separated channels of a river rejoin at the downstream end.

Gascoyne River river in Australia

The Gascoyne River is a river in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. At 865 kilometres (537 mi), it is the longest river in Western Australia.

Significant gold and tin deposits have been found in the Thomas River Gascoyne gold fields. [2]

Gold Chemical element with atomic number 79

Gold is a chemical element with symbol Au and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium. Less commonly, it occurs in minerals as gold compounds, often with tellurium.

Tin Chemical element with atomic number 50

Tin is a chemical element with the symbol Sn (from Latin: stannum) and atomic number 50. It is a post-transition metal in group 14 of the periodic table of elements. It is obtained chiefly from the mineral cassiterite, which contains stannic oxide, SnO2. Tin shows a chemical similarity to both of its neighbors in group 14, germanium and lead, and has two main oxidation states, +2 and the slightly more stable +4. Tin is the 49th most abundant element and has, with 10 stable isotopes, the largest number of stable isotopes in the periodic table, thanks to its magic number of protons. It has two main allotropes: at room temperature, the stable allotrope is β-tin, a silvery-white, malleable metal, but at low temperatures it transforms into the less dense grey α-tin, which has the diamond cubic structure. Metallic tin does not easily oxidize in air.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Map of Thomas River, WA". Bonzle Digital Atlas of Australia. 2008. Retrieved 6 February 2009.
  2. Year Book Australia, 1910. Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2009.