1408

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1408 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1408
MCDVIII
Ab urbe condita 2161
Armenian calendar 857
ԹՎ ՊԾԷ
Assyrian calendar 6158
Balinese saka calendar 1329–1330
Bengali calendar 815
Berber calendar 2358
English Regnal year 9  Hen. 4   10  Hen. 4
Buddhist calendar 1952
Burmese calendar 770
Byzantine calendar 6916–6917
Chinese calendar 丁亥(Fire  Pig)
4104 or 4044
     to 
戊子年 (Earth  Rat)
4105 or 4045
Coptic calendar 1124–1125
Discordian calendar 2574
Ethiopian calendar 1400–1401
Hebrew calendar 5168–5169
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1464–1465
 - Shaka Samvat 1329–1330
 - Kali Yuga 4508–4509
Holocene calendar 11408
Igbo calendar 408–409
Iranian calendar 786–787
Islamic calendar 810–811
Japanese calendar Ōei 15
(応永15年)
Javanese calendar 1322–1323
Julian calendar 1408
MCDVIII
Korean calendar 3741
Minguo calendar 504 before ROC
民前504年
Nanakshahi calendar −60
Thai solar calendar 1950–1951
Tibetan calendar 阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1534 or 1153 or 381
     to 
阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
1535 or 1154 or 382

Year 1408 ( MCDVIII ) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG, such as the years 1888, 1928, 1956, 1984, 2012, 2040, 2068, 2096, 2108, 2136, 2164, and 2192 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 315 days remain until the end of the year.

Battle of Bramham Moor

The Battle of Bramham Moor on 19 February 1408 was the final battle in the Percy Rebellion of 1402 – 1408, which pitted Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, leader of the wealthy and influential Percy family, against the usurper King of England, King Henry IV. The Percys had previously aided Henry IV in his coup d'etat against his cousin King Richard II in 1399.

September ninth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

September is the ninth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the third of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the fourth of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere September is the seasonal equivalent of March in the Southern Hemisphere.

Date unknown

Moldavia principality in Southeast Europe between 1330–1859 (nowadays historical and geographical region in Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine)

Moldavia is a historical region and former principality in Central and Eastern Europe, corresponding to the territory between the Eastern Carpathians and the Dniester River. An initially independent and later autonomous state, it existed from the 14th century to 1859, when it united with Wallachia as the basis of the modern Romanian state; at various times, Moldavia included the regions of Bessarabia, all of Bukovina and Hertza. The region of Pokuttya was also part of it for a period of time.

<i>Yongle Encyclopedia</i> encyclopedia

The Yongle Encyclopedia or Yongle Dadian is a partially lost Chinese leishu encyclopedia commissioned by the Yongle Emperor of the Ming dynasty in 1403 and completed by 1408. Its sheer scope and size made it the world's largest paper-based general encyclopedia.

Gotland island and historical province in Sweden

Gotland is a province, county, municipality, and diocese of Sweden. It is Sweden's largest island. The province includes the islands of Fårö and Gotska Sandön to the north, as well as the Karlsö Islands to the west. The population is 58,595, of which about 23,600 live in Visby, the main town. The island of Gotland and the other areas of the province of Gotland make up less than one percent of Sweden's total land area.

Births

January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 340 days remain until the end of the year.

Catherine of Hanau also known as Katharina was a German regent. She was the regent of the County of Rieneck during the minority of her son from 1431 until 1434. She was the eldest daughter of Reinhard II, who would become the first Count of Hanau in 1429, and Catherine of Nassau-Beilstein.

Year 1460 (MCDLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Thomas Bardolf, 5th Baron Bardolf was a baron in the Peerage of England, Lord of Wormegay, Norfolk, of Shelford and Stoke Bardolph in Nottinghamshire, Hallaton (Hallughton), Leicestershire, and others, and was "a person of especial eminence in his time".

February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 314 days remain until the end of the year.

Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland 14th-century English noble

Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, 4th Baron Percy, titular King of Mann, KG, Lord Marshal was the son of Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy, and a descendant of Henry III of England. His mother was Mary of Lancaster, daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, son of Edmund, Earl of Leicester and Lancaster, who was the son of Henry III.

Related Research Articles

Year 1402 (MCDII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1403 (MCDIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1421 (MCDXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1415 Year

Year 1415 (MCDXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1338 (MCCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

Year 1491 (MCDXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1397 (MCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1411 (MCDXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1417 (MCDXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1428 (MCDXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1429 (MCDXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1435 Year

Year 1435 (MCDXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1443 (MCDXLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

William FitzAlan, 16th Earl of Arundel English Earl

William FitzAlan, 16th Earl of Arundel, 6th Baron MaltraversKG.

Events from the 1400s in England.

Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of Oxford English noble

Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of OxfordKG was the son and heir of Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford. He took part in the trial of Richard, Earl of Cambridge and Lord Scrope for their part in the Southampton Plot, and was one of the commanders at Agincourt in 1415.

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

Fitzalan Chapel

The Fitzalan Chapel is located within the eastern end of the church building constructed on the western grounds of Arundel Castle. This church building is one of the very few church buildings that is currently divided into two worship areas, one Catholic and one Anglican, with the western side of the church building occupied by the Anglican church of St Nicholas. The Catholic chapel, now the private mausoleum of the Dukes of Norfolk, is a Grade I listed building.

References

  1. "Yongle dadian | Chinese encyclopaedia". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  2. Gabra, Gawdat; Takla, Hany N. (2017). Christianity and Monasticism in Northern Egypt: Beni Suef, Giza, Cairo, and the Nile Delta. Oxford University Press. p. 76. ISBN   9789774167775.