Cranberry sauce

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Cranberry sauce
Cranberry Sauce (3617909597).jpg
Alternative namesCranberry jam
Type Sauce or Jam
Place of originNew England pine flag.svg New England
Main ingredients Cranberries, sugar, water

Cranberry sauce or cranberry jam [1] is a sauce or relish made out of cranberries, commonly served as a condiment with Thanksgiving dinner in North America and Christmas dinner in the United Kingdom and Canada. There are differences in flavor depending on the geography of where the sauce is made: in Europe it is generally slightly sour-tasting, while in North America it is typically more heavily sweetened.

Sauce liquid, creaming or semi-solid food served on or used in preparing other foods

In cooking, a sauce is a liquid, cream, or semi-solid food, served on or used in preparing other foods. Most sauces are not normally consumed by themselves; they add flavor, moisture, and visual appeal to a dish. Sauce is a French word taken from the Latin salsa, meaning salted. Possibly the oldest recorded European sauce is garum, the fish sauce used by the Ancient Greeks; while doubanjiang, the Chinese soy bean paste is mentioned in Rites of Zhou in the 3rd century BC.

Relish A cooked, pickled, or chopped vegetable or fruit food item typically used as a condiment

A relish is a cooked and pickled product made of chopped vegetables, fruits or herbs and is a food item typically used as a condiment, in particular to enhance a staple. Examples are chutneys and the North American relish, a pickled cucumber jam eaten with hot dogs or hamburgers. In North America, the word "relish" is frequently used to describe a single variety of finely-chopped pickled cucumber relish, such as pickle, dill and sweet relishes. Such relishes are commonly used as a condiment, and pickle relish is an important ingredient in many varieties of the U.S. version of tartar sauce.

Cranberry subgenus of plants

Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines in the subgenus Oxycoccus of the genus Vaccinium. In Britain, cranberry may refer to the native species Vaccinium oxycoccos, while in North America, cranberry may refer to Vaccinium macrocarpon. Vaccinium oxycoccos is cultivated in central and northern Europe, while Vaccinium macrocarpon is cultivated throughout the northern United States, Canada and Chile. In some methods of classification, Oxycoccus is regarded as a genus in its own right. They can be found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

Contents

History

Cranberry sauce was first offered to consumers in North America in 1912 in Hanson, Massachusetts. [2] Canned cranberry sauce appeared on the market in 1941, allowing the product to be sold year-round. [3] Cranberry sauce can be used with a variety of meats, including turkey, pork, chicken, and ham.

Hanson, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Hanson is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States and is one of the inland towns of the South Shore. The population was 10,209 at the 2010 census.

Preparation

The most basic cranberry sauce consists of cranberries boiled in sugar water until the berries pop and the mixture thickens. Some recipes include other ingredients such as slivered almonds, orange juice, zest, ginger, maple syrup, port, or cinnamon.

Sugar Generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates

Sugar is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. The various types of sugar are derived from different sources. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose, fructose, and galactose. "Table sugar" or "granulated sugar" refers to sucrose, a disaccharide of glucose and fructose. In the body, sucrose is hydrolysed into fructose and glucose.

Almond Species of plant

The almond is a species of tree native to Iran and surrounding countries as well as Central Asia, but widely cultivated elsewhere. The almond is also the name of the edible and widely cultivated seed of this tree. Within the genus Prunus, it is classified with the peach in the subgenus Amygdalus, distinguished from the other subgenera by corrugations on the shell (endocarp) surrounding the seed.

Orange juice juice made from oranges

Orange juice is a liquid extract of the orange tree fruit, produced by squeezing or reaming oranges. It comes in several different varieties, including blood orange, navel oranges, valencia orange, clementine, and tangerine. As well as variations in oranges used, some varieties include differing amounts of juice vesicles, known as "pulp" in American English, and "(juicy) bits" in British English. These vesicles contain the juice of the orange and can be left in or removed during the manufacturing process. How juicy these vesicles are depend upon many factors, such as species, variety, and season. In American English, the beverage name is often abbreviated as "OJ".

Commercial cranberry sauce may be loose and uncondensed, or condensed or jellied and sweetened with various ingredients. The jellied form may be slipped out of a can onto a dish, and served sliced or intact for slicing at the table.

Fruit preserves A semi-creamy substance made of fruits/vegetables and sugar.

Fruit preserves are preparations of fruits, vegetables and sugar, often stored in glass jam jars.

Cranberry sauce is often eaten in conjunction with turkey for Christmas in the United Kingdom and Canada or Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, and it is only rarely eaten or served in other contexts there. [4]

Christmas holiday originating in Christianity, usually celebrated on December 25 (in the Gregorian or Julian calendars)

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed primarily on December 25 as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world. A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night; in some traditions, Christmastide includes an octave. Christmas Day is a public holiday in many of the world's nations, is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians, as well as culturally by many non-Christians, and forms an integral part of the holiday season centered around it.

See also

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References

  1. Pyenson, Andrea (2010-11-24). "A tale of two side dishes". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2010-11-25.
  2. "History of Cranberries". Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  3. Smith, K. Annabelle (27 November 2013). "This Man Made the First Canned Cranberry Sauce". Smithsonian magazine. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  4. Wallendorf, Melanie; Arnould, Eric (1991). ""We Gather Together": Consumption Rituals of Thanksgiving Day". Journal of Consumer Research. University of Chicago Press. 18 (1): 13–31. doi:10.1086/209237. JSTOR   2489481.