List of Christmas dishes

Last updated
An oven-roasted brine-soaked turkey Oven roasted brine-soaked turkey.jpg
An oven-roasted brine-soaked turkey
Fruit cake Traditional fruitcake.jpg
Fruit cake

These food items are traditionally eaten at or associated with the Christmas season.

Contents

Albania

Argentina

Vitello tonnato is a very popular Christmas dish in Argentina, where it is known as vitel tone. The Piedmontese dish is valued during the summer for its cold serving temperature, and is the legacy of the large Italian immigration to the country. Vitello tonnato.jpg
Vitello tonnato is a very popular Christmas dish in Argentina, where it is known as vitel toné. The Piedmontese dish is valued during the summer for its cold serving temperature, and is the legacy of the large Italian immigration to the country.

Panettone (known locally as pan dulce) and turrón are the most popular Christmas sweets in Argentina regardless of socioeconomic status, with 76% of Argentines choosing the former and 59% the latter in 2015. [2] Mantecol, a typical peanut dessert, is also popular, being favored by 49% of Argentines in the same survey. [3] Sparkling wines, ciders and frizzantes concentrate most of their sales during Christmas season; sparkling wine is mostly consumed by small families with high and medium socioeconomic status living in Greater Buenos Aires and the country's largest cities, while cider and frizzantes are popular among lower classes and large families. [3]

Panettone type of sweet bread loaf originally from Milan

Panettone is an Italian type of sweet bread loaf originally from Milan, usually prepared and enjoyed for Christmas and New Year in Western, Southern, and Southeastern Europe as well as in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, the Horn of Africa, Australia, and to a lesser extent in former French, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies.

Turrón

Turrón, or torrone, is a southern European nougat confection, typically made of honey, sugar, and egg white, with toasted almonds or other nuts, and usually shaped into either a rectangular tablet or a round cake. It is frequently consumed as a traditional Christmas dessert in Spain and Italy as well as countries formerly under the Spanish Empire, particularly in Latin America.

Socioeconomic status Economic and social measure of a persons affluence and/or influence

Socioeconomic status (SES) is an economic and sociological combined total measure of a person's work experience and of an individual's or family's economic and social position in relation to others, based on household income, earners' education, and occupation are examined, as well as combined income, whereas for an individual's SES only their own attributes are assessed. However, SES is more commonly used to depict an economic difference in society as a whole.

Vitello tonnato

Vitello tonnato is a Piedmontese (Italian) dish of cold, sliced veal covered with a creamy, mayonnaise-like sauce that has been flavored with tuna. It is served chilled or at room temperature, generally in the summertime, as the main course of an Italian meal or as "an exceedingly elegant antipasto for an elaborate dinner." It is also very popular in Argentina, where it is known as vitel toné, and considered a traditional Christmas dish.

Asado Latin-American dish of beef, sausages, and sometimes other meats, cooked on a grill (parrilla) or an open fire

Asado are the techniques and the social event of having or attending a barbecue in various South American countries, where it is also a traditional event. An asado usually consists of beef, pork, chicken, chorizo, and morcilla which are cooked on a grill, called a parrilla, or an open fire. Generally the meats are accompanied by red wine and salads. This meat is prepared by a person who is the assigned asador or parrillero.

Beef meat from cattle

Beef is the culinary name for meat from cattle, particularly skeletal muscle. Humans have been eating beef since prehistoric times. Beef is a source of high-quality protein and nutrients.

Australia

Candy Cane can be hung as edible decorations. Candy-Cane-Classic.jpg
Candy Cane can be hung as edible decorations.
White Christmas (food) Australian dessert

White Christmas is an Australian dessert.

Copha, a registered trademark of Peerless Foods, is a form of vegetable fat shortening made from hydrogenated coconut oil. Copha is produced only in Australia, but there are many suppliers of hydrogenated coconut fat in various forms worldwide. It is 100% fat, at least 98% of which is saturated. It also contains soybean lecithin.

Ham Pork from a leg cut that has been preserved by wet or dry curing, with or without smoking

Ham is pork from a leg cut that has been preserved by wet or dry curing, with or without smoking. As a processed meat, the term "ham" includes both whole cuts of meat and ones that have been mechanically formed.

Belgium

Cougnou

The cougnou or bread of Jesus is a bread baked during Christmas time and is typical of the southern Low Countries.

Brazil

Panettone Panettone - Nicolettone 2017 - IMG 7085 (31752542285).jpg
Panettone
Pork loin

Pork loin is a cut of meat from a pig, created from the tissue along the dorsal side of the rib cage.

French toast bread soaked in beaten eggs and then fried

French toast is a dish made of sliced bread soaked in eggs and milk, then fried. Alternative names and variants include eggy bread, Bombay toast, German toast, gypsy toast, poor knights, torrija and Arme Riddere.

Farofa Toasted cassava flour

Farofa is a toasted cassava or corn flour mixture. It is eaten mainly in Brazil. It can be found commercially produced and packaged but is often prepared at home based on family recipes. Most recipes will also contain varying amounts of salt, smoked meat, and spices. The consistency of the mixture ranges from large grains the size of cracked bulgur wheat or couscous down to a table-salt-sized powder. Most farofas have a very smoky and slightly salty taste, by and large used to accentuate the taste of meat, particularly barbecued meat and hearty stews.

Canada

Gingerbread house Ginger Bread House PC210088.JPG
Gingerbread house
Butter tart

A butter tart is a type of small pastry tart highly regarded in Canadian cuisine and considered one of Canada's quintessential treats. The sweet tart consists of a filling of butter, sugar, syrup, and egg, baked in a pastry shell until the filling is semi-solid with a crunchy top. The butter tart should not be confused with butter pie or with bread and butter pudding.

Candy cane

A candy cane is a cane-shaped stick candy often associated with Christmastide, as well as Saint Nicholas Day. It is traditionally white with red stripes and flavored with peppermint, but they also come in a variety of other flavors and colors.

Christmas pudding steamed pudding

Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner in the UK, Ireland and in other countries where it has been brought by Irish and British immigrants. It has its origins in medieval England, and is sometimes known as plum pudding or just "pud", though this can also refer to other kinds of boiled pudding involving dried fruit. Despite the name "plum pudding", the pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word "plums" as a term for raisins. The pudding is traditionally composed of thirteen ingredients, symbolizing Jesus and the Twelve Apostles, including many dried fruits held together by egg and suet, sometimes moistened by treacle or molasses and flavoured with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and other spices. The pudding is usually aged for a month or more, or even a year; the high alcohol content of the pudding prevents it from spoiling during this time.

Chile

Pan de pascua Pan de pascua chileno 2006.jpg
Pan de pascua

Colombia

Colombian Bunuelos Bunuelos.JPG
Colombian Buñuelos
Colombian natilla A plate of Colombian Natilla.JPG
Colombian natilla

Colombian Christmas dishes are mostly sweets and desserts. Some of the most popular dishes include:

Cuba

Czech Republic and Slovakia

Christmas cookies (vanocni cukrovi) Vanocni cukrovi 1.JPG
Christmas cookies (vánoční cukroví)

The traditional meal (served as dinner on Christmas Eve) consists of either fish soup, mushroom soup, cabbage soup, lentil soup, pea soup and fried fish (traditionally carp) served with potato salad. Cabbage soup almost always contains mushrooms and may contain smoked meat or sausage. The recipe for potato salad differs slightly among every Czech or Slovak family. The main ingredients are: potato cooked with jacket, canned peas, onions, cooked carrots, parsley and celery, pickled gherkins, cooked eggs and mayonnaise. Some families may add grated apples or salami. The best potato salad is prepared a day before Christmas Eve so that all the ingredients can "mellow" for a day. The Christmas dinner should be the first food consumed that day. Those who do not break the Christmas shrove are believed to be able to see a golden pig.

Before the Christmas holidays, many kinds of sweet biscuits are prepared. The Christmas cookies are then served during the whole Christmas period and exchanged among friends and neighbours. Very popular is also a preparation of small ginger breads garnished by sugar icing.

Denmark

Danish Christmas meal Julemiddag.jpg
Danish Christmas meal

Dominican Republic

Drinks:

Desserts:

Finland

A Karelian pasty Karjalanpiirakka-20060227.jpg
A Karelian pasty
Mulled wine Vin chaud 2.jpg
Mulled wine

Christmas smorgasbord from Finland, "Joulupöytä", (translated "Yule table"), a traditional display of Christmas food [27] served at Christmas in Finland, similar to the Swedish smörgåsbord, including:

Other meat dishes could be:

Desserts:

Drinks:

France

Foie gras en cocotte Foie gras en cocotte.jpg
Foie gras en cocotte
Kouglof Kouglof.png
Kouglof

Germany

A Christmas Stollen Stollen-Dresdner Christstollen.jpg
A Christmas Stollen

Guatemala

Hong Kong

Hungary

Toltott kaposzta Kaposzta.jpg
Töltött káposzta

Iceland

Mondlugrautur Risalamande.jpg
Möndlugrautur

India

Christianity is not a major religion of India, but Christians in India celebrate Christmas by enjoying several dishes, such as Allahabadi cake, Candy canes,Plum cakes etc. Some of the popular dishes eaten during Christmas in India are:

Church services are also held in churches throughout India, in which Christmas dinners are held which include dishes such as Allahabadi cake, candy canes, christmas cookies

Indonesia

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Lithuania

Malaysia

Malta

Mexico

Christmas roast Roast chicken.jpg
Christmas roast

New Zealand

A homemade Christmas pavlova decorated with pomegranate seeds and Chantilly cream. Christmas pavlova.jpg
A homemade Christmas pavlova decorated with pomegranate seeds and Chantilly cream.

Norway

Scandinavian-style gingerbread Freshly baked gingerbread - Christmas 2004.jpg
Scandinavian-style gingerbread

Panama

Paraguay

Philippines

Large bibingka from the Philippines Large bibinka.jpg
Large bibingka from the Philippines

Poland

12 dishes are served as a reminder of the 12 Apostles on Christmas Eve, 24 December. Polish people don't eat meat on this day, instead they choose from variety of fish and vegetable dishes. The meal begins when the first star is seen.

Barszcz with Uszka Uszka-aasica.jpg
Barszcz with Uszka
Makowiec Bejgli1.jpg
Makowiec

Portugal

Bolo-Rei Bolo Rei.jpg
Bolo-Rei

Puerto Rico

Drinks:

Dessert:

Romania

Cozonac Bg-kozunak-1.jpg
Cozonac

San Marino

Bustrengo Bustrengo.jpg
Bustrengo

Serbia

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Julbord Christmas dinner in Sweden Julbord.jpg
Julbord Christmas dinner in Sweden

Trinidad and Tobago

In Trinidad and Tobago traditional meals consists of generous helpings of baked ham, pastelles, black fruit cake, sweet breads, along with traditional drinks such as sorrel, ginger beer, and ponche de crème. The ham is the main item on the Christmas menu with sorrel to accompany it. [54]
Christmas ham
Sorrel
Pastelles also known as Hallacas
Ponche de crème a version of eggnog
Black Cake
Christmas Recipes [55]

Ukraine

Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christians in Ukraine traditionally have 2 Christmas dinners. The first one is a Lent Dinner, it is held on the January 6 and should consist of meatless dishes. The second one is a Christmas Festive dinner held on January 7, when the meat dishes and alcohol are already allowed on the table. The dinner normally has 12 dishes which represent Jesus's 12 disciples. Both Christmas dinners traditionally include a number of authentic Ukrainian dishes, which have over thousand-year history and date back to pagan times.

United Kingdom and Ireland

Christmas pudding Christmas pudding.JPG
Christmas pudding

In the United Kingdom, what is now regarded as the traditional meal consists of roast turkey with cranberry sauce, served with roast potatoes and parsnips and other vegetables, followed by Christmas pudding, a heavy steamed pudding made with dried fruit, suet, and very little flour. Other roast meats may be served, and in the nineteenth century the traditional roast was goose. The same carries over to Ireland with some variations.

United States

Roast turkey Thanksgiving Turkey.jpg
Roast turkey
Christmas ham Julskinka.JPG
Christmas ham

See also: Thanksgiving (the dishes tend to be similar)

Venezuela

Hallaca Hallaca at La Casa de Pedro.jpg
Hallaca

See also

Related Research Articles

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Finnish cuisine

Finnish cuisine is notable for generally combining traditional country fare and haute cuisine with contemporary continental style cooking. Fish and meat play a prominent role in traditional Finnish dishes in some parts of the country, while the dishes elsewhere have traditionally included various vegetables and mushrooms. Evacuees from Karelia contributed to foods in other parts of Finland.

Puerto Rican cuisine Cuisine originating from Puerto Rico

Puerto Rican cuisine has its roots in the cooking traditions and practices of Europe, Africa and the native Taínos. Starting from the latter part of the 19th century. Puerto Rican cuisine can be found in several other countries.

Polish cuisine Country-specific Cuisine of Poland

Polish cuisine is a style of cooking and food preparation originating in or widely popular in Poland. Polish cuisine has evolved over the centuries to become very eclectic due to Poland's history and it shares many similarities with neighbouring Czech and Slovak culinary traditions. It has also been widely influenced by other Central European cuisines, namely German, Austrian and Hungarian as well as Jewish, French, Italian, and Turkish. Polish-styled cooking in other cultures is often referred to as à la polonaise.

Danish cuisine culinary traditions of Denmark

Danish cuisine originated from the peasant population's own local produce and was enhanced by cooking techniques developed in the late 19th century and the wider availability of goods during and after the Industrial Revolution. Open sandwiches, known as smørrebrød, which in their basic form are the usual fare for lunch, can be considered a national speciality when prepared and decorated with a variety of fine ingredients. Hot meals are typically prepared with meat or fish. Substantial meat and fish dishes includes flæskesteg and kogt torsk with mustard sauce and trimmings. Ground meats became widespread during the industrial revolution and traditional dishes that are still popular includes frikadeller, karbonader and medisterpølse. Denmark is known for its Carlsberg and Tuborg beers and for its akvavit and bitters, but amongst the Danes themselves imported wine has gained steadily in popularity since the 1960s.

Joulupöytä is the traditional assortment of foods served at Christmas in Finland, similar to the Swedish julbord. It contains many different dishes, most of them typical for the season. The main dish is usually a large Christmas ham, which is eaten with mustard or bread along with the other dishes. Fish is also served, and the ham is served with laatikkos, casseroles made with swede, potato and carrot, occasionally liver. The traditional Christmas beverage is either alcoholic or non-alcoholic mulled wine.

Ukrainian cuisine cuisine of Ukraine

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Burmese cuisine

Burmese cuisine is mainly an amalgam of cuisines from various regions of Myanmar. It has also been influenced by various cuisines of neighbouring countries, in particular, China, India and Thailand.

Czech cuisine Food and cuisine of Czechia

Czech cuisine has both influenced and been influenced by the cuisines of surrounding countries and nations. Many of the cakes and pastries that are popular in Central Europe originated within the Czech lands. Contemporary Czech cuisine is more meat-based than in previous periods; the current abundance of farmable meat has enriched its presence in regional cuisine. Traditionally, meat has been reserved for once-weekly consumption, typically on weekends. The body of Czech meals typically consists of two or more courses; the first course is traditionally soup, the second course is the main dish, and the third course can include supplementary courses, such as dessert or compote. In the Czech cuisine, thick soups and many kinds of sauces, both based on stewed or cooked vegetables and meats, often with cream, as well as baked meats with natural sauces (gravies), are popular dishes usually accompanied with beer, especially Pilsner, that Czechs consume the most in the world. Czech cuisine is also very strong in sweet main courses and desserts, a unique feature in European cuisines.

Christmas dinner Meal traditionally eaten at Christmas

Christmas dinner is a meal traditionally eaten at Christmas. This meal can take place any time from the evening of Christmas Eve to the evening of Christmas Day itself. The meals are often particularly rich and substantial, in the tradition of the Christian feast day celebration, and form a significant part of gatherings held to celebrate the arrival of Christmastide. In many cases, there is a ritual element to the meal related to the religious celebration, such as the praying of grace.

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Dominican Republic cuisine

Dominican Republic cuisine is predominantly made up of a combination of Spanish, indigenous Taíno, and African influences. Many Middle-Eastern dishes have been adopted into Dominican cuisine, such as the "Quipe" that comes from the Lebanese kibbeh. Dominican cuisine resembles that of other countries in Latin America, those of the nearby islands of Puerto Rico and Cuba, most of all, though the dish names differ sometimes.

Traditional Estonian cuisine has substantially been based on meat and potatoes, and on fish in coastal and lakeside areas, but now bears influence from many other cuisines, including a variety of international foods and dishes, with a number of contributions from the traditions of nearby countries. Scandinavian, German, Russian, Latvian, Lithuanian and other influences have played their part. The most typical foods in Estonia have been rye bread, pork, potatoes and dairy products. Estonian eating habits have historically been closely linked to the seasons. In terms of staples, Estonia belongs firmly to the beer, vodka, rye bread and pork "belt" of Europe.

Silesian cuisine

Silesian cuisine is an umbrella term for all dishes with a specific regional identity belonging to the region of Silesia. It is a subtype of Polish and German cuisine with many similarities to and signs of the influence of neighbouring cuisines.

A great variety of cassava-based dishes are consumed in the regions where cassava is cultivated, and they include many national or ethnic specialities.

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