Central Italy

Last updated
Central Italy

Italia centrale
Italia centrale.svg
CountryItaly
Regions
Area
  Total58,052 km2 (22,414 sq mi)
Population
[1]
  Estimate 
(2016 est.)
12,067,524
Languages 
 – Official language Italian
 – Other common languages

Central Italy (Italian : Italia centrale or just Centro) is one of the five official statistical regions of Italy used by the National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT), a first-level NUTS region and a European Parliament constituency.

Contents

Regions

Central Italy encompasses four of the country's 20 regions:

The southernmost and easternmost parts of Lazio (Sora, Cassino, Gaeta, Cittaducale, Formia, and Amatrice districts) are often included in Southern Italy (the so-called Mezzogiorno ) for cultural and historical reasons, since they were once part of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and southern Italian dialects are spoken.

As a geographical region, however, central Italy may also include the regions of Abruzzo and Molise, [2] [3] [4] which are usually part of Southern Italy for cultural and historical reasons.

Politics

Marche, Tuscany and Umbria – together with Emilia-Romagna – are considered to be the most left-leaning regions in Italy, and together are also referred to as the "Red Belt". [5] [6] [7] [8]

Lazio, particularly outside of Rome, is more politically conservative, a trait which it shares with Southern Italy.[ citation needed ]

Economy

The Gross domestic product (GDP) of the region was 380.9 billion euros in 2018, accounting for 21.6% of Italy's economic output. GDP per capita adjusted for purchasing power was 31,500 euros or 105% of the EU27 average in the same year. [9]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Umbria Region of Italy

Umbria is a region of central Italy. It includes Lake Trasimeno and Marmore Falls, and is crossed by the River Tiber. The regional capital is Perugia.

Regions of Italy First-level administrative divisions

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Marche Region of Italy

Marche or the Marches is one of the twenty regions of Italy. The name of the region derives from the plural name of marca, originally referring to the medieval March of Ancona and nearby marches of Camerino and Fermo. Marche is well known for its shoemaking tradition, with fine and luxurious Italian footwear manufacturing facilities in the region.

Padania Place in Italy

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Northeast Italy geographic region of Italy

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Province of Viterbo Province of Italy

Viterbo is a province in the Lazio region of Italy. Its capital is the city of Viterbo.

Economy of the European Union overview about the economy of the European Union

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Roman Italy Italian peninsula during the Roman Empire

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Northern Italy Place in Italy

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Insular Italy geographic region of Italy

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Central Italian group of Italo-Dalmatian Romance dialects spoken in central Italy

Central Italian is a group of Italo-Dalmatian Romance lects spoken in central Italy in Lazio, Umbria, central Marche, the far south of Tuscany, and a small part of Abruzzo. The differences between these dialects are slight, mainly in inflection and stress of certain words.

South Italy Regions of Italy

South Italy is one of the five official statistical regions of Italy used by the National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT), a first level NUTS region and a European Parliament constituency. South Italy encompasses six of the country's 20 regions:

Tuscany Region of Italy

Tuscany is a region in central Italy with an area of about 23,000 square kilometres and a population of about 3.8 million inhabitants (2013). The regional capital is Florence (Firenze).

Northwest Italy geographic region of Italy

Northwest Italy is one of the five official statistical regions of Italy used by the National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT), a first level NUTS region and a European Parliament constituency. Northwest encompasses four of the country's 20 regions:

Italo-Dalmatian languages Language family

The Italo-Dalmatian languages, or Central Romance languages, are a group of Romance languages spoken in Italy, Corsica (France) and formerly in Dalmatia (Croatia).

Villa Littorio Frazione in Campania, Italy

Villa Littorio is an Italian village and hamlet (frazione) of the municipality of Laurino in the Province of Salerno, Campania. As of 2009 its population was of 612.

The Vissana is a breed of domestic sheep from the province of Macerata, in the Marche in central Italy. It may be extinct. It takes its name from the comune of Visso in the Monti Sibillini, and is or was raised mostly in that area, extending also into Umbria and Tuscany; herds under transhumant management formerly over-wintered in Lazio. Cross-breeding with the Comisana, the Sarda and the Sopravissana may have contributed to a substantial decline in breed numbers which was noted in the 1980s. The Vissana is one of the forty-two autochthonous local sheep breeds of limited distribution for which a herdbook is kept by the Associazione Nazionale della Pastorizia, the Italian national association of sheep-breeders.

The Sopravissana is a breed of domestic sheep from the province of Macerata, in the Marche in central Italy. The name derives from the area of origin, the comune of Visso in the Monti Sibillini; it was traditionally raised mostly in that area, but flocks ranged into Lazio, Tuscany and Umbria. The Sopravissana derives from the cross-breeding of local ewes with Spanish and Rambouillet Merino rams in the 18th century. It is larger than the Vissana breed from the same area.

References

  1. "Statistiche demografiche ISTAT". www.demo.istat.it.
  2. Source: Touring Club Italiano (TCI), "Atlante stradale d'Italia". 1999–2000 TCI Atlas. ISBN   88-365-1115-5 (Northern Italy volume) – ISBN   88-365-1116-3 (Central Italy volume) – ISBN   88-365-1117-1 (Southern Italy volume)
  3. Source: De Agostini, "Atlante Geografico Metodico". ISBN   88-415-6753-8
  4. Source: Enciclopedia Italiana "Treccani"
  5. "'Italians first': how the populist right became Italy's dominant force". The Guardian . 1 December 2018.
  6. Roy Palmer Domenico (2002). The Regions of Italy: A Reference Guide to History and Culture. p. 313.
  7. "Italy's EU election results by region: Who won where?". The Local . 27 May 2019.
  8. Western Europe 2003. 2002. p. 362.
  9. "Regional GDP per capita ranged from 30% to 263% of the EU average in 2018". Eurostat.

Coordinates: 42°18′35″N13°14′58″E / 42.3097°N 13.2494°E / 42.3097; 13.2494