Sweden women's national football team

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Sweden
Sweden national football team badge.svg
Nickname(s) Blågult
(The Blue and Yellow)
Association Svenska Fotbollförbundet (SvFF)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Peter Gerhardsson
Captain Caroline Seger
Most caps Therese Sjögran (214) [1]
Top scorer Lotta Schelin (88) [2]
Home stadium Gamla Ullevi
FIFA code SWE
Kit left arm left.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body zwed19hw.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm right.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts swe19hw.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks zwed18h.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm left.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body zwed19aw.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm right.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts zwed19aw.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks zwed19aw.png
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 5 Steady2.svg (25 June 2021) [3]
Highest3 (June 2007)
Lowest11 (June 2018)
First international
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0–0 Finland  Flag of Finland.svg
(Mariehamn, Finland; 25 August 1973)
Biggest win
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 17–0 Azerbaijan  Flag of Azerbaijan.svg
(Gothenburg, Sweden; 23 June 2010)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 5–1 Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg
(Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 6 August 2016)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1991 )
Best resultRunners-up (2003)
European Championship
Appearances10 (first in 1984 )
Best resultChampions (1984)

The Sweden women's national football team (Swedish : svenska damfotbollslandslaget) represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has been traditionally recognized as one of the world's best women's teams and has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984. Like the equally successful men's counterpart, the female one also gained a World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers (1987, 1995, 2001). The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

The 2003 World Cup-final was the only second time Sweden ever reached the final of a FIFA World Cup after the 1958 FIFA World Cup Final, and was the second most watched event in Sweden that year. Lotta Schelin is the top goalscorer in the history of Sweden with 85 goals. Schelin surpassed Hanna Ljungberg's 72-goal record against Germany on 29 October 2014. [4] The player with the most caps is Therese Sjögran, with 214. The team was coached by Thomas Dennerby from 2005 to 2012, and Pia Sundhage from 2012 to 2017. The head coach is Peter Gerhardsson.

After winning the two qualifying matches against Denmark for the Beijing 2008 Olympics, the Swedish Olympic Committee approved of record increases in investments for the women's team. The new budget granted over a million SEK (about US$150,000) for the team and 150,000 SEK (about US$25,000) per player for developing physical fitness. The new grants are almost a 100% increase of the 2005 and 2006 season funds. [5]

The developments and conditions of the Sweden women's national football team from its beginnings until 2013 can be seen in the 2013 three-part Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport .

Team image

Home stadium

The Sweden women's national football team plays their home matches on the Gamla Ullevi.

Results and fixtures

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

Legend

  Win  Draw  Lose  Void or postponed  Fixture

2020

27 October 2020 (2020-10-27) UEFA W Euro 2022 qualifying Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg2–0Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Gothenburg
18:30  UTC+1
Report Stadium: Gamla Ullevi
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
1 December 2020 (2020-12-01) UEFA W Euro 2022 qualifying Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg0–6Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Trnava, Slovakia
18:00  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Anton Malatinský Stadium
Referee: Karoline Wacker (Germany)

2021

19 February 2021 (2021-02-19) FIFA International Friendly Austria  Flag of Austria.svg1–6Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Paola, Malta
15:00  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Hibernians Stadium
Referee: Zuzana Valentová (Slovakia)
23 February 2021 (2021-02-23) FIFA International Friendly Malta  Flag of Malta.svg0–3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Paola, Malta
14:30  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Hibernians Stadium
Referee: Maria Ferrieri (Italy)
10 April 2021 (2021-04-10) FIFA International Friendly Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg1–1Flag of the United States.svg  United States Stockholm
19:00  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Friends Arena
Referee: Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)
13 April 2021 (2021-04-13) FIFA International Friendly Poland  Flag of Poland.svg2–4Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Łódź, Poland
17:30  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Stadion Miejski Widzewa
Referee: Reka Molnar (Hungary)
10 June 2021 (2021-06-10) FIFA International Friendly Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg1–0Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Kalmar
18:30  UTC+2 Report (Svenskfotboll)
Report
Stadium: Guldfågeln Arena
Attendance: 500
Referee: Maika Vanderstichel (France)
15 June 2021 (2021-06-15) FIFA International Friendly Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg0–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Kalmar
18:45  UTC+2 Report (Svenskfotboll)
Report
Stadium: Guldfågeln Arena
Attendance: 500
Referee: Ivana Martinčić (Croatia)
21 July 2021 (2021-07-21) Olympics GS Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg3–0Flag of the United States.svg  United States Tokyo, Japan
17:30  UTC+9
Report (FIFA) Stadium: Tokyo Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Yoshimi Yamashita (Japan)
24 July 2021 (2021-07-24) Olympics GS Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg4–2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Saitama, Japan
17:30  UTC+9 Report (FIFA) Stadium: Saitama Stadium 2002
Referee: Edina Alves Batista (Brazil)
27 July 2021 (2021-07-27) Olympics GS New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg0–2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Rifu, Japan
17:00  UTC+9 Stadium: Miyagi Stadium
Referee: Laura Fortunato (Argentina)
30 July 2021 (2021-07-30) QF Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg3–1Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Saitama, Japan
Report Report
Stadium: Saitama Stadium 2002
Attendance: 0
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)
2 August 2021 (2021-08-02) SF Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg0–1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Yokohama Japan
Report Stadium: International Stadium Yokohama
Referee: Melissa Borjas (Honduras)
6 August 2021 F Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svgvFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Tokyo, Japan
Report Stadium: National Stadium

Coaching staff

Current coaching staff

As of 6 June 2021. [6]
PositionNameRef.
Head coach Flag of Sweden.svg Peter Gerhardsson
Assistant coach Flag of Sweden.svg Magnus Wikman
Goalkeeping coach Flag of Sweden.svg Leif Troedsson
Physical coach Flag of Sweden.svg Pontus Ekblom

Technical staff

PositionNameRef
General manager Flag of Sweden.svg Marika Domanski-Lyfors
Doctor Flag of Sweden.svg Mats Börjesson [7]

Manager history

NamePWDLGFGADebutLast match
Christer Molander 10100025 August 197325 August 1973
Flag of Sweden.svg Hasse Karlsson 12714191026 July 19742 October 1976
Flag of Sweden.svg Tord Grip 761017318 June 197721 October 1978
Ulf Bergquist 73311045 July 197927 July 1979
Flag of Sweden.svg Ulf Lyfors 51341161353928 June 198030 September 1987
Flag of Sweden.svg Gunilla Paijkull 4330671003027 April 198829 November 1991
Flag of Sweden.svg Bengt Simonsson 6037617153698 March 199231 August 1996
Flag of Sweden.svg Marika Domanski-Lyfors 1357126382771429 October 199616 June 2005
Flag of Sweden.svg Thomas Dennerby 11368182724011228 August 200515 September 2012
Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage 814318201567223 October 201229 July 2017
Flag of Sweden.svg Peter Gerhardsson 15112234619 September 2017-
Total525310931221,141487--
Statistics as of 24 October 2018. [8]

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for the friendly against Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia on 15 June 2021. [9]

Caps and goals are current as of 15 June 2021, after match against Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Hedvig Lindahl (1983-04-29) 29 April 1983 (age 38)1720 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid
1 GK Jennifer Falk (1993-04-26) 26 April 1993 (age 28)80 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken
1 GK Zećira Mušović (1996-05-26) 26 May 1996 (age 25)50 Flag of England.svg Chelsea

2 DF Magdalena Eriksson (1993-09-08) 8 September 1993 (age 27)708 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
2 DF Emma Berglund (1988-12-19) 19 December 1988 (age 32)561 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård
2 DF Jonna Andersson (1993-01-02) 2 January 1993 (age 28)561 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
2 DF Amanda Ilestedt (1993-01-17) 17 January 1993 (age 28)414 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
2 DF Nathalie Björn (1997-05-04) 4 May 1997 (age 24)264 Flag of England.svg Everton
2 DF Emma Kullberg (1991-09-25) 25 September 1991 (age 29)60 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken

3 MF Caroline Seger (captain) (1985-03-19) 19 March 1985 (age 36)21529 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård
3 MF Kosovare Asllani (1989-07-29) 29 July 1989 (age 32)14838 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid
3 MF Olivia Schough (1991-03-11) 11 March 1991 (age 30)8311 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård
3 MF Filippa Angeldahl (1997-07-14) 14 July 1997 (age 24)114 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken
3 MF Julia Roddar (1992-02-16) 16 February 1992 (age 29)90 Flag of the United States.svg Washington Spirit
3 MF Hanna Bennison (2002-10-16) 16 October 2002 (age 18)80 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård
3 MF Filippa Curmark (1995-08-02) 2 August 1995 (age 26)41 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken
3 MF Johanna Rytting Kaneryd (1997-02-12) 12 February 1997 (age 24)50 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken

4 FW Sofia Jakobsson (1990-04-23) 23 April 1990 (age 31)12323 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid
4 FW Stina Blackstenius (1996-02-05) 5 February 1996 (age 25)6417 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken
4 FW Fridolina Rolfö (1993-11-24) 24 November 1993 (age 27)5014 Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg
4 FW Mimmi Larsson (1994-04-09) 9 April 1994 (age 27)286 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård
4 FW Julia Zigiotti Olme (1997-12-24) 24 December 1997 (age 23)160 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken
4 FW Madelen Janogy (1995-11-12) 12 November 1995 (age 25)174 Flag of Sweden.svg Hammarby
4 FW Rebecka Blomqvist (1997-07-24) 24 July 1997 (age 24)81 Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg

Recent call-ups

The following players have been named to a Sweden squad in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Emma Holmgren (1997-05-13) 13 May 1997 (age 24)00 Flag of Sweden.svg Eskilstuna United v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, 13 April 2021 PRE

DF Nilla Fischer (1984-08-02) 2 August 1984 (age 37)18523 Flag of Sweden.svg Linköping v. Flag of the United States.svg  United States, 10 April 2021
DF Linda Sembrant (1987-05-15) 15 May 1987 (age 34)12614 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, 13 April 2021
DF Jessica Samuelsson (1992-01-30) 30 January 1992 (age 29)610 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, 13 April 2021
DF Hanna Glas (1993-04-16) 16 April 1993 (age 28)420 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 10 June 2021 INJ [10]
DF Josefine Rybrink (1998-01-19) 19 January 1998 (age 23)30 Flag of Sweden.svg Kristianstads v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, 13 April 2021

MF Amanda Nildén (1998-08-07) 7 August 1998 (age 22)10 Flag of Sweden.svg Eskilstuna United v. Flag of Malta.svg  Malta, 23 February 2021

FW Lina Hurtig (1995-09-05) 5 September 1995 (age 25)3812 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus v. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, 13 April 2021 WIT [11]
FW Pauline Hammarlund (1994-05-07) 7 May 1994 (age 27)206 Flag of Sweden.svg BK Häcken v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 1 December 2020
FW Anna Anvegård (1997-05-10) 10 May 1997 (age 24)198 Flag of Sweden.svg Rosengård v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 1 December 2020
FW Loreta Kullashi (1999-05-20) 20 May 1999 (age 22)83 Flag of Sweden.svg Eskilstuna United v. Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia, 22 October 2020

Notes:

Previous squads

Player records

Active players in bold, statistics as of 17 May 2021. [12]

Competitive record

FIFA Women's World Cup

Sweden playing against Germany in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Final. FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 - Germany vs Sweden.jpg
Sweden playing against Germany in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Final.
FIFA Women's World Cup recordQualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Third place3rd64021876420133
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Quarter-finals5th421164Qualified as hosts
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Quarter-finals6th4202766600185
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Runners-up 2nd64021076501274
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Group stage10th3111348710326
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Third place3rd650110610820406
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Round of 1616th403158101000321
Flag of France.svg 2019 Third place3rd75021268701222
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 2023 To be determinedTo be determined
TotalBest: Runners-up8/94023512714854475218427

Olympic Games

Sweden celebrate after the semi final victory against Brazil at the 2016 Summer Olympics. Futebol feminino olimpico- Brasil e Suecia no Maracana (29033096025).jpg
Sweden celebrate after the semi final victory against Brazil at the 2016 Summer Olympics.
Summer Olympics recordQualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD *LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Group stage6th310245421164
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000 Group stage6th301214108202511
Flag of Greece.svg 2004 Fourth place4th520345129033711
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Quarter-final6th4202451310214213
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Quarter-final7th4121751613215012
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016 Runners-up2nd6132481712414010
Flag of Japan.svg 2020 Qualified5401104
Flag of France.svg 2024 To be determined
Flag of the United States.svg 2028
TotalBest: Runners-up6/62576122432775811821065

UEFA Women's Championship

Sweden in the UEFA Women's Euro 2013. Svenska damlandslaget i fotboll 2013.jpg
Sweden in the UEFA Women's Euro 2013.
UEFA Women's Championship recordQualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD *LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
  1984 Champions1st4301646600261
Flag of Norway.svg 1987 Runners-up2nd2101446501143
Flag of Germany.svg 1989 Third place3rd2101336231114
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991 Did not qualify6420133
Flag of Italy.svg 1993 Did not qualify6321184
Flag of Germany.svg 1995 Runners-up2nd3102986501252
Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1997 Semi-finals3rd4301626510262
Flag of Germany.svg 2001 Runners-up2nd53027485212810
Flag of England.svg 2005 Semi-finals3rd4121448611265
Flag of Finland.svg 2009 Quarter-finals5th4211748800310
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 Semi-finals3rd5311133Qualified as hosts
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 Quarter-finals7th4112458701223
Flag of England.svg 2022 Qualified
TotalBest: Champions11/1337195136341745611724037
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's soccer hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

YearResult
Flag of Portugal.svg 1994 Third place
Flag of Portugal.svg 1995 Champions
Flag of Portugal.svg 1996 Runners-up
Flag of Portugal.svg 1997 Third place
Flag of Portugal.svg 1998 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 1999 Sixth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2000 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2001 Champions
Flag of Portugal.svg 2002 Third place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2003 Fifth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 Fifth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2005 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2006 Third place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2007 Third place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2008 Fifth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2009 Champions
Flag of Portugal.svg 2010 Third place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2011 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2012 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2013 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2014 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2015 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2016
Flag of Portugal.svg 2017 Seventh place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2018 Champions
Flag of Portugal.svg 2019 Fourth place
Flag of Portugal.svg 2020 Seventh place

Head-to-head record

The following table shows Sweden's all-time international record from 1973.

[16] [17]

AgainstPlayedWonDrawnLostGFGAGD
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 110010+1
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 12741228+14
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 220081+7
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 2200200+20
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 2200120+12
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4400133+10
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 220040+4
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 10325914−5
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2314454323+20
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 110020+2
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 2610973224+8
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 110010+1
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 220060+6
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 541082+6
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 110010+1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 563112139053+37
Flag of England.svg  England 2615834821+27
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 2200100+10
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 37306111816+102
Flag of France.svg  France 2011363925+14
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3081213553−18
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 110020+2
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 101000±0
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 8800442+42
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 1713225511+44
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 110070+7
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2315444215+27
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 146352814+14
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 4400251+24
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 110030+3
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 321041+3
Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 220090+9
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2210573217+15
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 422095+4
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 440051+4
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 220070+7
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 552112228788−1
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 8800313+28
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 10802308+22
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 6510221+21
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 4400220+22
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 7700171+16
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 6600172+15
Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg  Serbia and Montenegro 220091+8
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 6600261+25
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 321071+6
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 4310111+10
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 220060+6
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10730326+26
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 131201447+37
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 110051+4
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 4301113+8
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 42712234173−32
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 3300121+11
Total557330981291221507714

FIFA world rankings

As of 21 April 2021 [18]

 Worst Ranking   Best Ranking   Worst Mover   Best Mover  

Sweden's FIFA world rankings
RankYearGames
Played
WonLostDrawnBestWorst
RankMoveRankMove
5202143015Increase2.svg 05Decrease2.svg 0

Honours

Intercontinental

Med 2.png Silver medalist: 2016
Med 2.png Runner-up: 2003
Med 3.png Third place: 1991, 2011, 2019

Continental

Med 1.png Champion: 1984
Med 2.png Runner-up: 1987, 1995, 2001
Med 3.png Third place: 1989 (not determined after 1993)

Regional

Med 1.png Champion: 1995, 2001, 2009, 2018
Med 2.png Runner-up: 1996
Med 3.png Third place: 1994, 1997, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2010
Med 1.png Champion: 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
Med 2.png Runner-up: 1974, 1975, 1976, 1982
Med 1.png Champion: 1990, 1992
Med 1.png Champion: 1987
Med 1.png Champion: 2003

See also

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Tore Klas Agne Simonsson was a Swedish footballer who played as a striker. Beginning his career with Örgryte IS, he went on to represent Real Madrid and Real Sociedad in La Liga in the early 1960s before returning to Örgryte in 1963. Simonsson won 51 caps for the Sweden national team, and was a part of the Sweden team that finished second at the 1958 FIFA World Cup. He was also the recipient of the 1959 Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal after a spectacular performance for Sweden in an international game against England at Wembley Stadium.

Therese Sjögran

Kerstin Ingrid Therese Sjögran is a Swedish football manager and coach, and former player as a midfielder for Damallsvenskan club FC Rosengård and the Sweden women's national football team. A modern pioneer and source of inspiration in women's football, she is considered one of the greatest Swedish footballers of all time and imagined by some as a possible future head coach for the national team. Nicknamed Terre, Sjögran made her first Damallsvenskan appearances for Kristianstad/Wä DFF. She joined Malmö FF Dam in 2001 and remained with the club through its different guises as LdB FC and FC Rosengård. Sjögran spent the 2011 season with American Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) club Sky Blue FC.

Leif Håkan Ingemar Engqvist is a Swedish former footballer who played as a midfielder. During his career he played for Lunds BK, Malmö FF and Trelleborgs FF. He earned 18 caps for the Sweden national football team, and participated in the 1990 FIFA World Cup. He also took part in the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Stig "Vittjärv" Sundqvist was a Swedish professional footballer who played as a forward or midfielder. He played 11 games for the Swedish national team and scored 3 goals in the 1950 FIFA World Cup, helping Sweden to a third-place finish and their first ever world cup medal. After the World Cup he left Swedish side IFK Norrköping for the Italian club A.S. Roma, where he remained until 1953. Upon returning to Sweden he was active in coaching, among other teams Jönköpings Södra IF, for several years.

Owe Ohlsson Swedish footballer and manager

Sven Owe Ohlsson is a Swedish former football player who played as a forward and later became a manager. He most notably represented IFK Göteborg and AIK at the club level. He won 15 caps for the Sweden national team and was a squad member at the 1958 FIFA World Cup.

Anna Anvegård Swedish association football player

Anna Elin Astrid Anvegård is a Swedish professional footballer who plays as a forward for Everton in the FA WSL and the Sweden national team.

References

  1. "Sjögran Caps and goals".
  2. "Landslagsdatabas — svenskfotboll.se". www2.svenskfotboll.se.
  3. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 25 June 2021. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  4. "Förlust i Örebro mot Tyskland". Swedish Football Association (in Swedish). 29 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  5. Mats Bråstedt. "'SOK lovar damerna en storsatsning'". Expressen.se. Retrieved 26 October 2007.
  6. "Ledare, damlandslaget - Svensk fotboll".
  7. "GUJ3-2016English". Issuu.
  8. "Damlandslaget - Svensk fotboll". www.svenskfotboll.se.
  9. "Damernas trupp till landskamper i juni". www.svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). Retrieved 1 July 2021.
  10. "Startelvan mot Australien". www.svenskfotboll.se.
  11. "Hurtig ansluter inte till lägret". www.svenskfotboll.se.
  12. "Sweden – Caps and Goals".
  13. "Fischer missar EM-kvalet mot Lettland". SVT Sport (in Swedish). 13 August 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  14. "Stjärnorna saknas – missar EM-kvalet mot Lettland". www.expressen.se (in Swedish). 13 August 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2019.
  15. "Nilla Fischer - Spelarstatistik - Svensk fotboll". www.svenskfotboll.se.
  16. "Sveriges motståndare 1973–2016" (in Swedish). SvFF.
  17. "Sveriges motståndare 1973-2020" (PDF). Svensk fotboll (in Swedish). SvFF . Retrieved 15 June 2021. This document is updated annually in December/January.
  18. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking - Associations - Sweden - Women's". FIFA . 16 April 2021. Retrieved 21 April 2021.
  19. "Algarve Cup (Women)". www.rsssf.com.
  20. Nordic Women's Championships 1974–1982 rsssf.com/ Retrieved 09–03–13.
  21. Cyprus Tournament (Women) 1990–1993 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  22. North America Cup 1987 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  23. Australia Cup 1999–2004 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
European Champions
1984 (First title)
Succeeded by
1987 Norway  Flag of Norway.svg