Tignall, Georgia

Last updated
Tignall, Georgia
Tignall-Hulin-17-ga.jpg
Hulin Avenue (SR 17)
Nickname(s): 
Little Atlanta,
Motto(s): 
"I'd rather be in Tignall"
Wilkes County Georgia Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Tignall Highlighted.svg
Location in Wilkes County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 33°52′1″N82°44′28″W / 33.86694°N 82.74111°W / 33.86694; -82.74111 Coordinates: 33°52′1″N82°44′28″W / 33.86694°N 82.74111°W / 33.86694; -82.74111
Country United States
State Georgia
County Wilkes
Area
[1]
  Total2.79 sq mi (7.23 km2)
  Land2.75 sq mi (7.13 km2)
  Water0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation
640 ft (191 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total546
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
496
  Density180.10/sq mi (69.53/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
30668
Area code(s) 706
FIPS code 13-76532 [3]
GNIS feature ID0356591 [4]

Tignall is a town in Wilkes County, Georgia, United States. The population was 546 at the 2010 census.

Contents

History

The Georgia General Assembly incorporated Tignall as a town in 1907. [5] It is unknown why the name "Tignall" was applied to this place. [6]

Geography

Tignall is located at 33°52′1″N82°44′28″W / 33.86694°N 82.74111°W / 33.86694; -82.74111 (33.866861, -82.741195). [7] The town lies along Georgia State Route 17 south of Elberton and north of Washington, and a few miles west of the Georgia-South Carolina state line.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.5 km2), all land.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 320
1920 653104.1%
1930 505−22.7%
1940 56712.3%
1950 502−11.5%
1960 55610.8%
1970 75636.0%
1980 733−3.0%
1990 711−3.0%
2000 653−8.2%
2010 546−16.4%
Est. 2019496 [2] −9.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 615 people, 279 households, and 179 families residing in the town. The population density was 214 people per square mile (87.5/km²). There were 315 housing units at an average density of 109.5 per square mile (42.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 52.53% White, 45.48% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.61% from other races, and 1.23% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.37% of the population.

There were 279 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.1% were married couples living together, 19.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the town, the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 18.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $18,077, and the median income for a family was $26,250. Males had a median income of $23,000 versus $14,740 for females. The per capita income for the town was $11,765. About 16.6% of families and 20.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.4% of those under age 18 and 21.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable person

Region

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia. Clark & Hines, State Printers. 1907. p. 950.
  6. Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 227. ISBN   0-915430-00-2.
  7. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.