McCormick County, South Carolina

Last updated

McCormick County
County of McCormick
McCormickSC courthouse.jpg
McCormick County Seal.jpg
McCormick County Logo.png
Motto: 
"The Natural Place Of Life"
Map of South Carolina highlighting McCormick County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of South Carolina
South Carolina in United States.svg
South Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°54′N82°18′W / 33.9°N 82.3°W / 33.9; -82.3
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of South Carolina.svg  South Carolina
Founded1916
Named for Cyrus McCormick
Seat McCormick
Largest townMcCormick
Area
  Total394 sq mi (1,020 km2)
  Land359 sq mi (930 km2)
  Water35 sq mi (90 km2)  8.8%
Population
  Estimate 
(2021)
9,760
  Density27.2/sq mi (10.5/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 3rd
Website mccormickcountysc.org

McCormick County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2020 census, its population was 9,526, [1] making it the second least-populous county in South Carolina. Its county seat is McCormick. [2] The county was formed in 1916 from parts of Edgefield, Abbeville, and Greenwood Counties. [3]

Contents

History

The county was founded in 1916 and was named after Cyrus McCormick. The largest town and county seat is McCormick.

Geography

McCormick County, South Carolina
Interactive map of McCormick County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 394 square miles (1,020 km2), of which 359 square miles (930 km2) is land and 35 square miles (91 km2) (8.8%) is water. [4] It is the smallest county in South Carolina by land area and second-smallest by total area. McCormick County is in the Savannah River basin.

National protected area

State and local protected areas/sites

Major water bodies

Adjacent Counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1920 16,444
1930 11,471−30.2%
1940 10,367−9.6%
1950 9,577−7.6%
1960 8,629−9.9%
1970 7,955−7.8%
1980 7,797−2.0%
1990 8,86813.7%
2000 9,95812.3%
2010 10,2332.8%
2020 9,526−6.9%
2021 (est.)9,760 [5] 2.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2013 [10]
2020 [11]

2020 census

McCormick County racial composition [12]
RaceNum.Perc.
White (non-Hispanic)5,15554.12%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)3,91641.11%
Native American 270.28%
Asian 360.38%
Pacific Islander 20.02%
Other/Mixed 2672.8%
Hispanic or Latino 1231.29%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 9,526 people, 3,957 households, and 2,513 families residing in the county.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,233 people, 4,027 households, and 2,798 families living in the county. [13] [10] The population density was 28.5 inhabitants per square mile (11.0/km2). There were 5,453 housing units at an average density of 15.2 per square mile (5.9/km2). [14] The racial makeup of the county was 49.7% black or African American, 48.7% white, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 0.1% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.8% of the population. [13] In terms of ancestry, 10.7% were English, 10.2% were American, 10.2% were German, and 6.0% were Irish. [15]

Of the 4,027 households, 21.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 15.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.5% were non-families, and 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.65. The median age was 50.0 years. [13]

The median income for a household in the county was $35,858 and the median income for a family was $43,021. Males had a median income of $32,606 versus $28,067 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,411. About 14.2% of families and 18.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.6% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over. [16]

2000 census

As of the census [17] of 2000, there were 9,958 people, 3,558 households and 2,604 families living in the county. The population density was 28 people per square mile (11/km2). There were 4,459 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 53.88% Black or African American, 44.78% White, 0.07% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. 0.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,558 households, out of which 24.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.80% were married couples living together, 17.60% had a female householder with no husband present and 26.80% were non-families. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 19.50% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 28.10% from 45 to 64 and 16.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 113.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 115.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,577, and the median income for a family was $38,822. Males had a median income of $28,824 versus $21,587 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,770. About 15.10% of families and 17.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.50% of those under age 18 and 11.90% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics

Like most rural South Carolina counties with a tight Black-white population ratio, the Democratic Party has fared well in McCormick County compared to others across the South, especially with the national party's cultural turn to the left in the 2000s and 2010s. However, in 2016 Donald Trump won the county by one fewer vote than Barack Obama did in 2012, marking the first GOP victory in the area since Richard Nixon in 1972.

United States presidential election results for McCormick County, South Carolina [18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 2,95851.92%2,68747.17%520.91%
2016 2,65250.84%2,47947.53%851.63%
2012 2,46747.81%2,65351.41%400.78%
2008 2,43746.58%2,75552.66%400.76%
2004 2,39646.78%2,64851.70%781.52%
2000 1,70446.54%1,89651.79%611.67%
1996 1,10435.35%1,85859.49%1615.16%
1992 89929.46%1,84660.48%30710.06%
1988 1,17240.22%1,72259.09%200.69%
1984 1,18643.51%1,52655.98%140.51%
1980 79730.60%1,77468.10%341.31%
1976 64026.37%1,77473.09%130.54%
1972 1,30260.22%84439.04%160.74%
1968 46621.08%98844.69%75734.24%
1964 93965.34%49834.66%00.00%
1960 34733.79%68066.21%00.00%
1956 10211.74%48555.81%28232.45%
1952 57748.04%62451.96%00.00%
1948 00.00%304.04%71395.96%
1944 10.28%30786.72%4612.99%
1940 112.56%41997.44%00.00%
1936 81.20%65698.80%00.00%
1932 50.93%53099.07%00.00%
1928 203.14%61596.70%10.16%
1924 152.72%52094.37%162.90%
1920 00.00%557100.00%00.00%
1916 00.00%63799.69%20.31%


Communities

Towns

Census-designated places

Notable people

See also

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References

  1. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: McCormick County, South Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved June 11, 2022.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "South Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". South Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Archived from the original on January 3, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  5. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: McCormick County, South Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved June 11, 2022.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  8. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  10. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2013.
  11. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: McCormick County, South Carolina". www.census.gov. Retrieved June 11, 2022.
  12. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  13. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  14. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  15. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  16. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  17. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  18. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 13, 2018.

Coordinates: 33°54′N82°18′W / 33.90°N 82.30°W / 33.90; -82.30