Timeline of music in the United States (1970–present)

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Timeline of music in the United States
Music history of the United States
Colonial erato the Civil WarDuring the Civil WarLate 19th centuryEarly 20th century40s and 50s60s and 70s80s to the present

This is a timeline of music in the United States from 1970 to the present.

Contents

1970

1971

Early 1970s music trends

1972

1973

1974

1975

Mid-1970s music trends

1976

1977

1978

Late 1970s music trends

1979

1980

Early 1980s music trends
  • Music education curricula in the United States begin incorporating musical elements from diverse areas of both the country and the world. [105]
  • Americans become more interested in the music education of their children, especially after news of the "Mozart effect", in which children exposed to Western classical music are said to become more intelligent later in life, spreads across the country. [105]
  • The last documented use of Ghost Dance-derived songs ends, among the Naraya songs, sung by women for general well-being, of the Wind River Shoshone. [130]
  • Hardcore punk develops and spreads across the country. [131]

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

Mid-1980s music trends

1986

1987

1988

Late 1980s music trends

1989

1990

Early 1990s music trends

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

Mid-1990s music trends

1996

1997

1998

Late 1990s music trends
  • Live musical instruments again become common parts of recorded hip hop. [12]

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Related Research Articles

Punk rock is a music genre that emerged in the mid-1970s. Rooted in 1950s rock and roll and 1960s garage rock, punk bands rejected the perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock music. They typically produced short, fast-paced songs with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often shouted political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produce recordings and distribute them through independent record labels.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Moshing</span> Style of dance

Moshing is an extreme style of dancing in which participants push or slam into each other. Taking place in an area called the mosh pit, it is typically performed to aggressive styles of live music such as punk rock and heavy metal.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Contemporary Christian music</span> Genre of modern popular music lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith

Contemporary Christian music (CCM), also known as Christian pop, and occasionally inspirational music, is a genre of modern popular music, and an aspect of Christian media, which is lyrically focused on matters related to the Christian faith and stylistically rooted in Christian music. It was formed by those affected by the 1960s Jesus movement revival who began to express themselves in other styles of popular music, beyond the church music of hymns, gospel and Southern gospel music that was prevalent in the church at the time. Initially referred to as Jesus music, today, the term is typically used to refer to pop, but also includes rock, alternative rock, hip hop, metal, contemporary worship, punk, hardcore punk, Latin, electronic dance music, R&B-influenced gospel, and country styles.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Music of the United States</span>

The United States' multi-ethnic population is reflected through a diverse array of styles of music. It is a mixture of music influenced by the music of Europe, Indigenous peoples, West Africa, Latin America, Middle East, North Africa, amongst many other places. The country's most internationally renowned genres are traditional pop, jazz, blues, country, bluegrass, rock, rock and roll, R&B, pop, hip-hop/rap, soul, funk, religious, disco, house, techno, ragtime, doo-wop, folk, americana, boogaloo, tejano, reggaeton, surf, and salsa, amongst many others. American music is heard around the world. Since the beginning of the 20th century, some forms of American popular music have gained a near global audience.

In the United States, California is commonly associated with the film, music, and arts industries; there are numerous world-famous Californian musicians. New genres of music, such as surf rock and third wave ska, have their origins in California.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Music of New York City</span> Overview of music activities in New York City

The music of New York City is a diverse and important field in the world of music. It has long been a thriving home for popular genres such as jazz, rock, soul music, R&B, funk, and the urban blues, as well as classical and art music. It is the birthplace of hip hop, garage house, boogaloo, doo wop, bebop, punk rock, disco, and new wave. It is also the birthplace of salsa music, born from a fusion of Cuban and Puerto Rican influences that came together in New York's Latino neighborhoods in the 1960s. The city's culture, a melting pot of nations from around the world, has produced vital folk music scenes such as Irish-American music and Jewish klezmer. Beginning with the rise of popular sheet music in the early 20th century, New York's Broadway musical theater, and Tin Pan Alley's songcraft, New York has been a major part of the American music industry.

The music of Minnesota began with the native rhythms and songs of Indigenous peoples, the first inhabitants of the lands which later became the U.S. state of Minnesota. Métis fur-trading voyageurs introduced the chansons of their French ancestors in the late eighteenth century. As the territory was opened up to white settlement in the 19th century, each group of immigrants brought with them the folk music of their European homelands. Celtic, German, Scandinavian, and Central and Eastern European song and dance remain part of the vernacular music of the state today.

Virginia's musical contribution to American culture has been diverse, and includes Piedmont blues, jazz, folk, brass, hip-hop, and rock and roll bands, as well as the founding origins of country music in the Bristol sessions by Appalachian Virginians.

The music of the Philippines includes the musical performance arts in the Philippines and the music of Filipinos composed in various local and international genres and styles. Philippine musical compositions are often a mixture of indigenous styles, and various Asian styles, as well as Spanish/Latin American and (US) American influences through foreign rule from those countries.

Popular music of the United Kingdom in the 1990s continued to develop and diversify. While the singles charts were dominated by boy bands and girl groups, British soul and Indian-based music also enjoyed their greatest level of mainstream success to date, and the rise of World music helped revitalise the popularity of folk music. Electronic rock bands like The Prodigy and Chemical Brothers began to achieve a high profile. Alternative rock reached the mainstream, emerging from the Madchester scene to produce dream pop, shoegazing, post rock and indie pop, which led to the commercial success of Britpop bands like Blur and Oasis; followed by a stream of post-Britpop bands like Radiohead and The Verve.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">American popular music</span>

American popular music has had a profound effect on music across the world. The country has seen the rise of popular styles that have had a significant influence on global culture, including ragtime, blues, jazz, swing, rock, bluegrass, country, R&B, doo wop, gospel, soul, funk, punk, disco, house, techno, salsa, grunge and hip hop. In addition, the American music industry is quite diverse, supporting a number of regional styles such as zydeco, klezmer and slack-key.

Seattle is the largest city in the U.S. state of Washington and has long played a major role in the state's musical culture, popularizing genres of alternative rock such as grunge and being the origin of major bands like Alice in Chains, Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, Screaming Trees, Mudhoney, Foo Fighters, and most notably, Nirvana. The city remains home to several influential artists, bands, labels, and venues.

This is a timeline of music in the United States prior to 1819.

This is a timeline of music in the United States from 1950 to 1969.

This is a timeline of music in the United States from 1820 to 1849.

This timeline of music in the United States covers the period from 1850 to 1879. It encompasses the California Gold Rush, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and touches on topics related to the intersections of music and law, commerce and industry, religion, race, ethnicity, politics, gender, education, historiography and academics. Subjects include folk, popular, theatrical and classical music, as well as Anglo-American, African American, Native American, Irish American, Arab American, Catholic, Swedish American, Shaker and Chinese American music.

This is a timeline of music in the United States from 1880 to 1919.

This is a timeline of music in the United States from 1920 to 1949.

Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training. It stands in contrast to both art music and traditional or "folk" music. Art music was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings. Traditional music forms such as early blues songs or hymns were passed along orally, or to smaller, local audiences.

Punk rap is hip hop music influenced by the rebellious ethos, and sometimes musical characteristics, of punk rock. The genre has been described as being influenced by styles such as trap music, punk rock, heavy metal and lo-fi music.

References

Notes

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  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Levine, Victoria Lindsay. "Southeast". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 466–471.
  7. Southern, pg. 499
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  9. Crawford, pg. 545
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  11. 1 2 3 4 5 Greenfield, Steve; Guy Osborn. "Lawsuits". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 495–497.
  12. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Norfleet, Dawn M. "Hip-Hop and Rap". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 692–704.
  13. Levine, pg. xxiv
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  21. 1 2 Théberge, Paul. "Home Recording". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music. pp. 619–620.
  22. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Cockrell, Dale and Andrew M. Zinck, "Popular Music of the Parlor and Stage", pgs. 179–201, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
  23. Chase, pg. 541
  24. Southern, pg. 505
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  28. Maultsby, Portia K.; Isaac Kalumbu. "African American Studies". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 47–54.
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  30. 1 2 3 4 Maultsby, Portia K. "Funk". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 681–686.
  31. 1 2 3 4 5 Pegley, Karen and Rob Haskins, "Snapshot: Two Forms of Electronic Music", pgs. 250–255, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
  32. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Bergey, Barry, "Government and Politics", pgs. 288–303, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
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  34. Marlowe, Robert J. "Buck Owens Recording Studio". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music. p. 652.
  35. Tarsia, Joseph. "Sigma Sound Studios". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music. pp. 670–671.
  36. Strachan, Robert; Marion Leonard. "Archives". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 3–6.
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  38. 1 2 Erbsen, pg. 6
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  45. Miller, pg. 311
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  47. Mitchell, pg. 173
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  49. Clarke, pg. 66
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  51. Koskoff, pg. 32
  52. U.S. Army Bands
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  54. 1 2 3 4 5 Krasnow, Carolyn H. and Dorothea Hast, "Snapshot: Two Popular Dance Forms", pgs. 227–234, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
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  57. Darden, pg. 286
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  60. 1 2 3 4 Vallely, pg. 415
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  67. Atton, Chris. "Fanzines". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 226–228.
  68. 1 2 Cornelius, Steven. "Afro-Cuban Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 783–789.
  69. Chase, pg. 556
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  71. 1 2 Nguyen, Phong T.; Terry E. Miller. "Vietnamese Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 993–997.
  72. Catlin, Amy. "Hmong Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 1003–1006.
  73. 1 2 3 Miller, Terry E. "Lao, Thai, and Cham Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 1007–1010.
  74. Darden, pg. 276
  75. 1 2 Riis, Thomas L. "Musical Theater". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 614–623.
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  76. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Hyphen: Music Moments Archived September 7, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
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  78. Crawford, pg. 832
  79. 1 2 3 4 Kealiinohomoku, Joann W. and Mary Jane Warner, "Dance", pgs. 206–226, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
  80. Koskoff, pg. 30
  81. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Frisbie, Charlotte J. "American Indian Musical Repatriation". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 491–501.
  82. Miller, Terry E. "Overview". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 948–956.
  83. Chase, pg. 539
  84. Southern, pg. 497
  85. Mitchell, pg. 171
  86. Mitchell, pg. 172
  87. Blush, pg. 102
  88. Buckley, David; John Shepherd. "Stardom". Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 366–369.
  89. 1 2 3 Bastian, Vanessa. "Instrument Manufacture". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 526–529.
  90. Miller, pg. 338
  91. 1 2 3 Buckley, David; John Shepherd; Berndt Ostendorf. "Death". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 200–204.
  92. Bowers, Jane, Zoe C. Sherinian and Susan Fast, "Snapshot: Gendering Music", pgs. 103–115, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
  93. Rothenbuhler, Eric W.; Tom McCourt. "Radio". Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 329–333.
  94. 1 2 Smith, Jeff. "The Film Industry and Popular Music". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 499–504.
  95. Darden, pg. 147
  96. 1 2 3 4 Hilts, Janet; David Buckley; John Shepherd. "Crime". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 189–196.
  97. Chase, pg. 404
  98. Bird, pg. 200
  99. 1 2 Waksman, pg. 682
  100. Blush, pg. 14
  101. Blush, pg. 132
  102. Bird, pg. 41
  103. Laing, Dave. "Windham Hill". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. p. 774. Laing calls it "virtually synonymous" with New Age music.
  104. 1 2 3 Campbell, Patricia Sheehan and Rita Klinger, "Learning", pgs. 274–287, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
  105. 1 2 3 Miller, Rebecca S. "Irish Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 842–846.
  106. Shepherd, John; Peter Wicke. "Musicology". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 90–94.
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  109. 1 2 Théberge, Paul. "Amplifier". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 505–506.
  110. 1 2 Strachan, Robert; Marion Leonard. "Film and Television Documentaries". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 26–29.
  111. 1 2 Blush, pg. 17
  112. Sturman, Janet L. "Iberian Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 847–853.
  113. Martin, Claire. "Snapshot: The Tyagaraja Festival in Cleveland, Ohio". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 988–992.
  114. Hinkle-Turner, pg. 46
  115. Rettenmund, pg. 49
  116. Koskoff, pg. 31
  117. 1 2 3 4 5 Southern, pgs. 361–364
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  119. Blush, pg. 22
  120. Middleton, Richard. "Semiology/Semiotics". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 122–126.
  121. President Bush Honors Black Music Month
  122. Hosokawa, Shuhei. "Walkman". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 524–525.
  123. 1 2 Wolfe, Charles K. and Jacqueline Cogdell DjeDje, "Snapshot: Two Views of Music, Race, Ethnicity, and Nationhood", pgs. 76–86, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
  124. Blush, pg. 18
  125. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Blondie
  126. Rettenmund, pg. 50
  127. Blush, pg. 16; Blush cites Joey Shithead of DOA, whose 1981 Hardcore 81 Blush describes as possibly the "first official use of the term in music".
  128. Asai, Susan M. "Japanese Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 967–974.
  129. Romero, Brenda M. "Great Basin". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 420–427.Herzog, George (1935). "Plains Ghost Dance and Great Basin Music". American Anthropologist. 38 (3): 403–419. doi: 10.1525/aa.1935.37.3.02a00040 .
  130. Blush, pg. 20
  131. Darden, pg. 273
  132. Darden, pg. 299
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  134. 1 2 3 Laing, Dave. "MTV". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 446–447.
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  137. Blush, pgs. 30–32; Blush calls the song a "lightning rod of controversy".
  138. Blush, pg. 62
  139. Blush, pg. 284
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  141. 1 2 3 4 5 Zheng, Su. "Chinese Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 957–966.
  142. Blush, pg. 138
  143. Blush, pg. 159
  144. Blush, pg. 173, 210, 228, 256, 260
  145. Southern, pgs. 604–605
  146. 1 2 U.S. Army Bands
  147. 1 2 Miller, pgs. 350–351
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  149. 1 2 Southern, pg. 600
  150. McQuillar, pg. 5
  151. Blush, pg. 203
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  153. Darden, pg. 288
  154. 1 2 Laing, Dave. "Sponsorship". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 565–566.
  155. 1 2 Post, Jennifer C., Neil V. Rosenberg and Holly Kruse, "Snapshot: How Music and Place Intertwine", pgs. 153–172, in the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music
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  160. Witmer, Robert. "British Caribbean Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 808–812.
  161. Shepherd, John; David Buckley. "Pornography". Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 322–328.
  162. 1 2 Cloonan, Martin. "Censorship". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 168–172.
  163. Southern, pg. 583
  164. 1 2 Moore, pg. xvi
  165. Blush, pg. 156
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  168. 1 2 Garner, Ken. "Programming". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 449–451.
  169. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Aerosmith
  170. Vallely, pg. 422
  171. Hilts, Janet; David Buckley; John Shepherd. "Cultural Imperialism". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 196–198.
  172. Haefer, J. Richard. "Southwest". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 428–439.Painter, Muriel Thayer (1986). With Good Heart: Yaqui Beliefs and Ceremonies in Pascua Village. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
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  175. Buckley, David. "Halls of Fame/Museums". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 29–31.
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  177. Laing, Dave. "Bootleg". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. p. 481.
  178. The Editors. "Smithsonian Institution Recordings". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 755–756.{{cite book}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  179. Monson, Ingrid. "Jazz". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 650–666.
  180. Horn, David. "Signifying". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 411–413.
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  183. Wicke, Peter. "The State". Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 369–371.
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  185. "Prindle Record Reviews – Bad Religion".
  186. "Bad Religion – "Suffer" :: RevHQ.com".
  187. 1 2 Stillman, Amy Ku'uleialoha. "Polynesian Music". The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. pp. 1047–1053.
  188. Strachan, Robert; Marion Leonard. "Popular Music in Advertising". Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 312–318.
  189. 1 2 Laing, Dave. "Berne Convention". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 480–481.
  190. Théberge, Paul. "DAT". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 509–510.
  191. Laing, Dave. "Jukebox". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 513–515.
  192. Laing, Dave. "Polls". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. p. 561.
  193. Rye, Howard; David Horn. "Discography". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 14–17.
  194. Laing, Dave. "Media". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. pp. 429–432.
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  201. Borwick, John. "Digital Compact Cassette". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. p. 510.
  202. Borwick, John. "Minidisc". The Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World. p. 517.
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Further reading