UEFA Women's Championship

Last updated
UEFA Women's Championship
UEFA Women's Championship logo.svg
Founded1982;38 years ago (1982)
Region Europe (UEFA)
Number of teams52 (qualifiers)
16 (finals)
Current championsFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands (1st title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of Germany.svg  Germany (8 titles)
Website Official website
Soccerball current event.svg UEFA Women's Euro 2021

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro, held every four years, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

Contents

History

Women's football history has interesting turns and twists starting all the way in Europe. [1] The predecessor tournament to the UEFA Women's Championship began in the early 1980s, under the name "UEFA European Competition for Representative Women's Teams". With the increasing popularity of women's football, the competition was given European Championship status by UEFA around 1990. Only the 1991 and 1995 editions have been used as European qualifiers for a FIFA Women's World Cup; starting in 1999, the group system used in men's qualifiers was also used for women's national teams.

Eight UEFA Women's Championships have taken place, preceded by three editions of the earlier "European Competition for Representative Women's Teams". The most recent holding of the competition is the 2017 Women's Euro hosted by the Netherlands in July and August 2017.

Unofficial women's European tournaments for national teams were held in Italy in 1969 [2] and 1979 [3] (won by Italy and Denmark respectively), but there was no formal international tournament until 1982 when the first UEFA 1984 European Competition for Women's Football qualification was launched. The 1984 Finals was won by Sweden. Norway won in the 1987 Finals. Since then, the UEFA Women's Championship has been dominated by Germany, which has won eight out of ten events, interrupted only by Norway in 1993. Germany's 2013 win was their sixth in a row.

The tournament was initially played as a four-team event. The 1997 edition was the first that was played with eight teams. The third expansion happened in 2009 when 12 teams participated. From 2017 onwards 16 teams compete for the championship. [4]

Results

YearHostFinalThird place match or losing semi-finalistsNumber of teams
WinnerScoreRunner-upThird placeScoreFourth place
1984
Details
VariousFlag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
1–0
0–1
4–3 (ps)
Flag of England.svg
England
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4
1987
Details
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2–1Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
2–1Flag of England.svg
England
4
1989
Details
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
4–1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
2–1
(a.e.t.)
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
4
1991
Details
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–1
(a.e.t.)
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
2–1
(a.e.t.)
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
4
1993
Details
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
1–0Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
3–1Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
4
1995
Details
VariousFlag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–2Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of England.svg  England and Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4
1997
Details
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–0Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain and Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8
2001
Details
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1–0
(gg)
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 8
2005
Details
Flag of England.svg  England Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
3–1Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland and Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 8
2009
Details
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
6–2 Flag of England.svg
England
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands and Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 12
2013
Details
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1–0 Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 12
2017
Details
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
4–2 Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria and Flag of England.svg  England 16
2021
Details
Flag of England.svg  England 16

Summary

Statistics do not include the unofficial 1969 and 1979 tournaments.

TeamWinnersRunners-up
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 8 (1989, 1991, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2013)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2 (1987, 1993)4 (1989, 1991, 2005, 2013)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (1984)3 (1987, 1995, 2001)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1 (2017)
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2 (1993, 1997)
Flag of England.svg  England 2 (1984, 2009)
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1 (2017)

Team summary

Participation details

Ceremony before the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (Germany vs. England) at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Helsinki, Finland UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (ceremony before the match).jpg
Ceremony before the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (Germany vs. England) at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Helsinki, Finland
Players fighting for the ball during the match between Germany and Norway in UEFA Euro 2009 Women's European Championship in Tampere, Finland. Euro 2009 - Germany-Norway - Goal Scrum 239.jpg
Players fighting for the ball during the match between Germany and Norway in UEFA Euro 2009 Women's European Championship in Tampere, Finland.
Reception of Germany women's national football team, after winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, on the balcony of Frankfurt's city hall "Romer" Euromeister-2009-frauenfussball-ffm-037.jpg
Reception of Germany women's national football team, after winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, on the balcony of Frankfurt's city hall "Römer"

Legend

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 1984
(4)
1987
Flag of Norway.svg
(4)
1989
Flag of Germany.svg
(4)
1991
Flag of Denmark.svg
(4)
1993
Flag of Italy.svg
(4)
1995
(4)
1997
Flag of Norway.svg
Flag of Sweden.svg
(8)
2001
Flag of Germany.svg
(8)
2005
Flag of England.svg
(8)
2009
Flag of Finland.svg
(12)
2013
Flag of Sweden.svg
(12)
2017
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
(16)
2021
Flag of England.svg
(16)
Years
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria ××××××SF1
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium GS1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark SF3rd3rdGSSFGSGSSF2nd9
Flag of England.svg  England 2nd4thSFGSGS2ndGSSFQ9
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland SFQFGS3
Flag of France.svg  France GSGSGSQFQFQF6
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1st1st4th1st1st1st1st1st1stQF10
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland ×××GSQFGS3
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy SF3rd4th4th2nd2ndGSGSQFQFGS11
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands SFGS1st3
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1st2nd2nd1stSFGSSF2ndSF2ndGS11
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal GS1
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia ××××GSGSGSGSGS5
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland ×GS1
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain ×SFQFQF3
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1st2nd3rd2ndSF2ndSFQFSFQF10
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland GS1
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Part of Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union ×GS1

General Statistics (1984 to 2017)

PosTeampartplydWDLGFGADifPts
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1043346310926+83108
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1038205136846+2265
3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1136157144748-152
4Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 930107133241-937
5Flag of England.svg  England 828113144051-1136
6Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 113195173854-1632
7Flag of France.svg  France 6218672929030
8Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3148242110+1126
9Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 3113351119-812
10Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 3123271014-411
11Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 1531151+410
12Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 51513111031-216
13Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 131113304
14Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 310118619-134
15Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 131023303
16Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1310235-23
17Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 1310224-23
18Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1310228-63

Tournament statistics

Highest attendances

All-time top scorers

RankNameEuroTotal
1984 Flag of Norway.svg
1987
Flag of Germany.svg
1989
Flag of Denmark.svg
1991
Flag of Italy.svg
1993
1995 Flag of Norway.svg
Flag of Sweden.svg
1997
Flag of Germany.svg
2001
Flag of England.svg
2005
Flag of Finland.svg
2009
Flag of Sweden.svg
2013
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
2017
1 Flag of Germany.svg Inka Grings 4610
Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz 2213210
3 Flag of Italy.svg Carolina Morace 2100148
Flag of Germany.svg Heidi Mohr 14128
Flag of Sweden.svg Lotta Schelin 01528
6 Flag of Sweden.svg Hanna Ljungberg 1236
7 Flag of Italy.svg Melania Gabbiadini 21205
Flag of Norway.svg Solveig Gulbrandsen 03025
Flag of Germany.svg Maren Meinert 11125
Flag of Italy.svg Patrizia Panico 120205
Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage 40105
Flag of England.svg Jodie Taylor 55
Flag of Sweden.svg Lena Videkull 01135
Flag of Germany.svg Bettina Wiegmann 002125

Top scorers by tournament

YearPlayerMaximum
matches
Goals
1984 Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage 44
1987 Flag of Norway.svg Trude Stendal 23
1989 Flag of Norway.svg Sissel Grude
Flag of Germany.svg Ursula Lohn
22
1991 Flag of Germany.svg Heidi Mohr 24
1993 Flag of Denmark.svg Susan Mackensie 22
1995 Flag of Sweden.svg Lena Videkull 33
1997 Flag of Italy.svg Carolina Morace
Flag of Norway.svg Marianne Pettersen
Flag of France.svg Angélique Roujas
54
2001 Flag of Germany.svg Claudia Müller
Flag of Germany.svg Sandra Smisek
53
2005 Flag of Germany.svg Inka Grings 54
2009 Flag of Germany.svg Inka Grings 66
2013 Flag of Sweden.svg Lotta Schelin 65
2017 Flag of England.svg Jodie Taylor 65

UEFA.com Golden Player by tournament

YearPlayer
1984 Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage
1987 Flag of Norway.svg Heidi Støre
1989 Flag of Germany.svg Doris Fitschen
1991 Flag of Germany.svg Silvia Neid
1993 Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise
1995 Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz
1997 Flag of Italy.svg Carolina Morace
2001 Flag of Sweden.svg Hanna Ljungberg
2005 Flag of Finland.svg Anne Mäkinen
2009 Flag of Germany.svg Inka Grings
2013 Flag of Germany.svg Nadine Angerer 1
2017 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Lieke Martens 1

1Official player of the tournament (from 2013)

See also

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References

  1. "History of Soccer - Women in Soccer".
  2. "Coppa Europa per Nazioni (Women) 1969". Rsssf.com. 19 March 2001. Retrieved 12 September 2009.
  3. "Inofficial European Women Championship 1979". Rsssf.com. 15 October 2000. Retrieved 12 September 2009.
  4. "Women's EURO and U17s expanded". UEFA. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011.