European Athletics Championships

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The European Athletics Championships is a biennial (from 2010) athletics event organised by the European Athletics Association. [1] First held in 1934 in Turin, the Championships have taken place every four years, with a few exceptions. Since 2010, they have been organised every two years, and when they coincide with the Summer Olympics, the marathon and racewalking events are not contested. From 2018, European Championships not held in an Olympic year will form part of the European Championships, a new quadrennial multi-sport event designed and held by individual European sports federations.

Contents

Editions

Notes: – men, – women

EditionYearCityCountryDatesVenueEventsNationsAthletesTop of the medal table
1 1934 Turin Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg  Italy 7–9 September Stadio Benito Mussolini 2223226Flag of Germany (1933-1935).svg  Germany
2 1938 Paris Flag of France.svg  France 3–5 September Stade Olympique de Colombes 2323272Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg  Germany
1938 Vienna Flag of Austria.svg  Austria [nb 1] 17–18 September Praterstadion 91480
3 1946 Oslo Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 22–25 August Bislett stadion 3320353Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
4 1950 Brussels Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 23–27 August Heysel Stadium 3424454Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
5 1954 Bern Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 25–29 August Stadion Neufeld 3528686Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
6 1958 Stockholm Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 19–24 August Stockholms Olympiastadion 3626626Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
7 1962 Belgrade Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 12–16 September Stadion JNA 3629670Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
8 1966 Budapest Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 30 August – 4 September Népstadion 3630769Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
9 1969 Athens Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 16–21 September Karaïskákis Stadium 3830674Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
10 1971 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 10–15 August Olympiastadion 3829857Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
11 1974 Rome Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 2–8 September Stadio Olimpico 3929745Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
12 1978 Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 29 August – 3 September Stadion Evžena Rošického 40291004Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
13 1982 Athens Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 6–12 September Olympiakó Stádio 4129756Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
14 1986 Stuttgart Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 26–31 August Neckarstadion 4331906Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
15 1990 Split Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 26 August – 2 September Stadion Poljud 4333952Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany
16 1994 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 7–14 August Olympiastadion 44441113Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
17 1998 Budapest Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 18–23 August Népstadion 44441259Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
18 2002 Munich Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6–11 August Olympiastadion 46481244Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
19 2006 Gothenburg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 7–13 August Ullevi 47481288Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
20 2010 Barcelona Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 27 July – 1 August Estadi Olímpic Lluís Companys 47501323Flag of France.svg  France
21 2012 Helsinki Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 27 June – 1 July Olympiastadion 42501230Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
22 2014 Zürich Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 12–17 August Letzigrund 47501439Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
23 2016 Amsterdam Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 6–10 July Olympisch Stadion 46501329Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
24 2018 [lower-alpha 1] Berlin Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 7–12 August Olympiastadion 5049 [lower-alpha 2] 1439Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
25 2020 Paris Flag of France.svg  France 26–30 August Stade Sébastien Charléty Cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic
26 2022 Munich Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 16–21 August Olympiastadion
27 2024

All-time medal table

Updated after 2018 Championships. [2] [3] Former countries in italic.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 120110101331
2Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 1189096304
3Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 897562226
4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 758078233
5Flag of France.svg  France 696560194
6Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 545260166
7Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 505153154
8Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 424448134
9Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 332840101
10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 294242113
11Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 28243688
12Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 273637100
13Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 26252273
14Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 20291867
15Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 18202462
16Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 16162759
17Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1612937
18Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 13141744
19Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 12161240
20Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 12131136
21Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 11131034
22Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 118928
23Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 1171129
24Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 8121333
25Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 7211038
26Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 6141030
27Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 66315
28Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 61310
29Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 47314
30Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 43310
31Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 36615
32Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 36413
33Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 3115
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 3115
35Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 2349
36Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 21710
37Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 2125
38Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 1427
39Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 1416
ANA flag (2017).svg  Authorised Neutral Athletes [1] 1326
40Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 0224
41Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 0101
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 0101
43Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 0011
Totals (43 nations)9629689612891

As of 2018, Andorra, Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cyprus, Georgia, Gibraltar, Kosovo, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro and San Marino have yet to win a medal. Saar competed once in 1954 without winning a medal.

Championship records

Multiple medallists

A total of 8 men and 11 women have won six or more medals at the competition. [2]

Men

NameCountryTotalGoldSilverBronzeYears
Christophe Lemaitre Flag of France.svg  France 84222010–2014
Harald Schmid Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 65101978–1986
Roger Black Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 65101986–1994
Mohamed Farah Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 65102006–2014
Kevin Borlée Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 64112010–2018
Martyn Rooney Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 63212010–2018
Pietro Mennea Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 63211971–1978
Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 63121986–1994

Women

NameCountryTotalGoldSilverBronzeYears
Irena Szewińska Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 105141966–1978
Fanny Blankers-Koen Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 85121938–1950
Renate Stecher Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 84401969–1974
Dafne Schippers Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 84312012–2018
Marlies Göhr Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 75111978–1986
Myriam Soumaré Flag of France.svg  France 71332010–2014
Marita Koch Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 66001978–1986
Heike Drechsler Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany & Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 65101986–1998
Grit Breuer Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany & Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 65101990–2002
Irina Privalova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union & Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 63211994–1998
Yevgeniya Sechenova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 62221946–1950

Most medals at one event

A total of 12 men and 5 women have won four or more medals at one event. [2]

Men

NoG/S/BAthleteCountryYearsEvent
5(3/2/0) Igor Ter-Ovanesyan Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1958–1971Long jump
4(4/0/0) Jānis Lūsis Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1962–1974Javelin throw
4(4/0/0) Colin Jackson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 1990–2002110 m hurdles
4(4/0/0) Steve Backley Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 1990–2002Javelin throw
4(4/0/0) Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad Flag of France.svg  France 2010–20183000 m steeplechase
4(3/1/0) Mohamed Farah Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 2006–20145000 m
4(3/1/0) Kevin Borlée Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 2010–20184 × 400 m
4(3/0/1) Adam Kszczot Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 2010–2018800 m
4(2/2/0) Viktor Sanejev Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1969–1978Triple jump
4(0/3/1) Gerd Kanter Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 2002–2016Discus throw
4(0/2/2) Alexander Kosenkow Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2002–20144 × 100 m
4(0/1/3) Lothar Milde Flag of Germany.svg  Germany & Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 1962–1971Discus throw

Women

NoG/S/BAthleteCountryYearsEvent
5(5/0/0) Sandra Perković Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 2010–2018Discus throw
5(4/0/1) Anita Włodarczyk Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 2010–2018Hammer throw
4(4/0/0) Nadezhda Chizhova Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1966–1974Shot put
4(4/0/0) Heike Drechsler Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany & Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1982–2002Long jump
4(1/1/2) Linda Stahl Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2010–2016Javelin throw

Most appearances

A total of 16 men and 11 women have at least 6 appearances. Updated after 2016 Championships. [2]

Men

NoNameCountryYears
7 Zoltán Kővágó Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 1998–2018
Gerd Kanter Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 2002–2018
David Söderberg Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2002–2018
Jesús España Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 2002–2018
Marian Oprea Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 2002–2018
6 Abdon Pamich Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1954–1971
Ludvík Danek Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 1962–1978
Nenad Stekic Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 1969–1990
Jesús Ángel García Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1994–2014
Virgilijus Alekna Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 1994–2014
Dwain Chambers Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 1998–2014
Nicola Vizzoni Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1998–2014
Serhiy Lebid Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 1998–2014
Szymon Ziółkowski Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1998–2014
Gregory Sedoc Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2002–2016
Johan Wissman Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2002–2016

Women

NoNameCountryYears
7 Krisztina Papp Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 2002–2018
6 Helena Fibingerová Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 1969–1986
Heike Drechsler Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany & Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1982–2002
Fernanda Ribeiro Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1986–2010
Felicia Tilea Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 1990–2010
Mélina Robert-Michon Flag of France.svg  France 1998–2016
Nuria Fernández Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1998–2014
Berta Castells Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 2002–2016
Dana Velďáková Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 2002–2016
Merja Korpela Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2002–2016
Ruth Beitia Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 2002–2016

See also

Notes

  1. Part of the European Championships
  2. Not including the ANA Athletes and the ART refugee athlete (DNS).
  1. Occupied by Nazi Germany

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References

  1. European Athletics Championships Zürich 2014 – STATISTICS HANDBOOK (PDF), European Athletics Association , retrieved 13 August 2014
  2. 1 2 3 4 Statistics Handbook 2018 European Athletics Championships. European Athletics (2018). Retrieved on 2018-08-07.
  3. 2018 medal table European Athletics. Retrieved on 2018-08-13.