European Rowing Championships

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European Rowing Championships
Statusactive
Genresports event
Date(s)midyear
Frequencyannual
Inaugurated 1893
Organised by FISA

The European Rowing Championships is an international Rowing regatta organised by FISA (the International Rowing Federation) for European rowing nations, plus Israel which, though not a member of the European federation is treated as a European nation for competition purposes. [1]

Contents

The championships date back to 1893, the year after FISA was founded. Over time, the competition grew in status and as it was not restricted to European countries, became regarded as the quasi-world championships. The World Rowing Championships were commenced in 1962 and the last European Championships were held in 1973 as from 1974, the World Championships became an annual event. The European Championships were re-introduced in 2007 but with a narrower focus on Europe.

History

The first regatta held as a European Rowing Championships was held in 1893 and these continued annually until 1913; the 1914 to 1919 events did not occur due to World War I. The annual schedule was next interrupted in 1928 when the Amsterdam Olympics were regarded as a replacement event; the 1920 Antwerp Olympics or the 1924 Paris Olympics had previously not been a reason for skipping the European Championships. The next time the Olympics were held in Europe, i.e. the 1936 Berlin Olympics, again saw the European Championships skipped. World War II saw the 1939 to 1946 regattas cancelled. The next European event was held in 1947, with subsequent years skipped due to Europe-based Olympics in 1948 (London) and 1952 (Helsinki).

The 1951 European Rowing Championships is notable as the first test event for international women's rowing organised by the International Rowing Federation (FISA). Regattas continued under that name until 1973. From 1962, the event was replaced (one year in four) by the World Rowing Championships, which then became an annual event from 1974. Women's events were introduced in 1954, the first international races for women, [2] [3] but even then men's and women's events were held on different days, and in some years at different venues.

On 27 May 2006 the FISA members voted to re-introduce a separate European Rowing Championships in its own right.

In the first regatta there were only three events (men's single, coxed four and eight) and only ten entries. Races were 3,000 m long, except for singles – which were only 2,000 m. Coxed pair was first raced in the following year and double scull was added in 1898. Coxless pair was added in 1924 and coxless four was added the year after. [4] The next change after that was the inclusion of women's rowing.

In 2007, when the European Rowing Championship was re-introduced, there were 14 Olympic boat classes racing over 2,000m. Historically the leading European nations, notably Great Britain and Germany, had taken a haphazard approach to attending the championships. Following the 2012 Summer Olympics, however, both fully committed to the event going forward, and from that date, the championships have progressed rapidly to represent one of the key events in world rowing; given the historic and modern strength of European rowing, they rank behind only the Olympic Games, World Championships and World Cup Series. In Olympic years, when World Championships are not held, they provide a key test ahead of the Olympic regatta, in addition to a significant competitive opportunity in their own right.

In 2015, European Rowing announced that the 2018 edition of the championships would form part of the first European Championships, a co-branded multi-sport event organised by, and consisting of the European championships of, the individual European sports federations.

Editions

The first regatta held as a European Rowing Championships was held in 1893. [5] [6] [7] [8] [lower-alpha 1]

EditionYearHost CityCountryEvents
1 1893 Lake Orta Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 3
2 1894 Mâcon Flag of France.svg  France 4
3 1895 Ostend Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 4
4 1896 Geneva Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 4
5 1897 Pallanza Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 4
6 1898 Turin Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5
7 1899 Ostend Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5
8 1900 Paris Flag of France.svg  France 5
9 1901 Zürich Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 5
10 1902 Strasbourg Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 5
11 1903 Venice Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5
12 1904 Paris Flag of France.svg  France 5
13 1905 Ghent Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5
14 1906 Pallanza Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5
15 1907 Rhine Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 5
16 1908 Lucerne Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 5
17 1909 Paris Flag of France.svg  France 5
18 1910 Ostend Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5
19 1911 Como Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5
20 1912 Geneva Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 5
21 1913 Ghent Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 5
1914–1919 not held because of World War I
22 1920 Mâcon Flag of France.svg  France 5
23 1921 Amstel Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 5
24 1922 Barcelona Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 5
25 1923 Como Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 5
26 1924 Zürich Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 6
27 1925 Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7
28 1926 Lucerne Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 7
29 1927 Como Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 7
30 1929 Bydgoszcz Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 7
31 1930 Liège Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 7
32 1931 Paris Flag of France.svg  France 7
33 1932 Belgrade Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 7
34 1933 Budapest Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 7
35 1934 Lucerne Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 7
36 1935 Berlin Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 7
37 1937 Amsterdam Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 7
38 1938 Milan Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 7
1939–1946 not held because of World War II
39 1947 Lucerne Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 7
40 1949 Amsterdam Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 7
41 1950 Milan Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 7
42 1951 Mâcon Flag of France.svg  France 7
43 1953 Copenhagen Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 7
44 1954 Amsterdam Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 12
45 1955 Bucharest/Ghent Flag of Romania.svg  Romania/Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 12
46 1956 Bled Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 12
47 1957 Duisburg Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 12
48 1958 Poznań Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 12
49 1959 Mâcon Flag of France.svg  France 12
50 1960 London Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 5
EditionYearHost CityCountryEvents
51 1961 Prague Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 12
52 1962 East Berlin Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 5
53 1963 Copenhagen/Moscow Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark/Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 12
54 1964 Amsterdam Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 12
55 1965 Duisburg Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 12
56 1966 Amsterdam Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 5
57 1967 Vichy Flag of France.svg  France 12
58 1968 East Berlin Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 5
59 1969 Klagenfurt Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 12
60 1970 Tata Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 5
61 1971 Copenhagen Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 12
62 1972 Brandenburg Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 5
63 1973 Moscow Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 12
1974–2006 not held because of World Rowing Championships
64 2007 Poznań Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 14
65 2008 Marathon Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 14
66 2009 Brest Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 14
67 2010 Montemor-o-Velho Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 22
68 2011 Plovdiv Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 14
69 2012 Varese Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 14
70 2013 Seville Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 17
71 2014 Belgrade Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 17
72 2015 Poznań Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 17
73 2016 Brandenburg Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 17
74 2017 Račice Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 18
75 2018 Glasgow Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 17
76 2019 Lucerne Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 17
77 2020 Poznań Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 22
78 2021 Varese Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
79 2022 Munich Flag of Germany.svg  Germany

All-time medal table

[ citation needed ]

Total of medals from 1893 to 2020. Alsace-Lorraine won one gold, three silvers and nine bronzes which are added to Germany's total medals.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 943924157
2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 8510270257
3Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 574044141
4Flag of France.svg  France 467676198
5Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 453738120
6Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 393926104
7Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 324141114
8Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 30391887
9Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 274249118
10Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 26161961
11Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 20173067
12Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 207330
13Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 16212057
14Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 15241453
15Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 14333178
16Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 13101134
17Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 1041327
18Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 97925
19Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 88521
20Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7213664
21Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 691025
22Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 65516
23Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 4171031
24Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 43512
25Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 4329
26Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 371020
27Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 34916
28Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2439
29Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2327
30Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 21811
31Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1337
32Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1269
33Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 1214
34Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 1146
35Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 0101
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 0101
37Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 0033
Totals (37 nations)6536896582000

See also

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References

  1. 2018 Edition Part of the European Championships
  1. "2015 European Rowing Championships / Event information - worldrowing.com".
  2. "Women in rowing". World Rowing. 23 February 2015. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  3. "Start ohne "Schallvorteile"" . Neues Deutschland (in German). 17 (186). 9 July 1962. p. 3. Retrieved 11 January 2018.
  4. "Antworten auf Anfragen aus unserem Leserkreis" [Answers to inquiries from our readers](PDF). R.C.B. Nachrichten (in German). Bern. 1 (6): 6–7. October–December 1932. Retrieved 16 June 2018.
  5. Part sourced from the official programme of the European Rowing Championships 2017, 26–28 May 2017, Račice, Czech Republic
  6. "World Rowing Cups for 2015 and 2016 to fit in with Rio Olympic preparations, FISA announce".
  7. "Event Notes: Brandenburg, Germany To Host 2016 European Rowing Championships".
  8. "Rowing joins the innovative European Sports Championships". worldrowing.com. 26 March 2015. Retrieved 20 September 2015.