Waurika, Oklahoma

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Waurika, Oklahoma
Jefferson county courthouse.jpg
Jefferson County, Oklahoma , courthouse in Waurika, OK, September 7, 2014. Courtesy Crimson Edge.
Motto(s): 
"Parakeet Capital of the World"
USA Oklahoma location map.svg
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Waurika
Usa edcp location map.svg
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Waurika
Coordinates: 34°10′12″N98°0′5″W / 34.17000°N 98.00139°W / 34.17000; -98.00139 Coordinates: 34°10′12″N98°0′5″W / 34.17000°N 98.00139°W / 34.17000; -98.00139
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Jefferson
Area
  Total12.49 sq mi (32.36 km2)
  Land12.48 sq mi (32.33 km2)
  Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation
896 ft (273 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total2,064
  Density165/sq mi (63.8/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
73573
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-79250 [1]
GNIS feature ID1099439 [2]

Waurika is the county seat of Jefferson County, Oklahoma, United States. [3] The population was 2,064 at the 2010 census, a 4.36 percent decrease from 2,158 at the 2000 census. [4]

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Jefferson County, Oklahoma U.S. county in Oklahoma

Jefferson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,472. Its county seat is Waurika. The county was created at statehood and named in honor of President Thomas Jefferson.

Oklahoma U.S. state in the United States

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south and west, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the 50 United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

Contents

A newspaper article claimed that Waurika promoted itself as "The Parakeet Capital of the World". It gave no explanation for using this slogan. [5]

City name

The name is the anglicized version of the Comanche compound woarɨhka ("worm eater") from woa ("worm") + tɨhka ("eat") and presumably refers to a group of Comanche living in the area or to some early European settlers whose plowing may have humorously resembled digging for worms. [6] Such humorous names were common in Comanche culture, such as the word for "rice", woarɨhkapɨh, literally "worm food".

Comanche language Uto-Aztecan language spoken by the Comanche people in the United States

Comanche is a Uto-Aztecan language spoken by the Comanche people, who split off from the Shoshone soon after they acquired horses around 1705. The Comanche language and the Shoshoni language are therefore quite similar, although certain consonant changes in Comanche have inhibited mutual intelligibility.

History

Former First Presbyterian Church, now a city office building. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). First Presbyterian Church Waurika.jpg
Former First Presbyterian Church, now a city office building. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).

Waurika was settled after the Comanche, Kiowa, and Apache Reservation was opened to non-Indians on August 6, 1901. The first white settler was James McGraw, who homesteaded on the present town site after moving from Burlington, Iowa. [7] The first sale of town lots was held on June 18, 1902. Nearly three thousand people attended the sale. [7]

Burlington, Iowa City in Iowa, United States

Burlington is a city and the county seat of Des Moines County, Iowa, United States. The population was 25,663 in the 2010 census, a decline from the 26,839 population in the 2000 census. Burlington is the center of a micropolitan area including West Burlington, Iowa, and Middletown, Iowa, and Gulfport, Illinois. Burlington is the home of Snake Alley, once labelled the crookedest alley in the world.

Waurika was incorporated in May 1903. On May 8 of that year, C. A. McBrian was sworn in as the town's first mayor. [7]

The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway came to Waurika on January 1902 after the railroad superintendent "designated the town as a flag station." [7] Waurika was formerly the northern terminus for the Wichita Falls and Southern Railroad, one of the 20th century properties of Frank Kell and Joseph A. Kemp of Wichita Falls, Texas. [8]

The Wichita Falls and Southern Railroad Company was a railroad in operation in North Texas from 1921 to 1954. It was incorporated in 1920 by several investors, most prominently Frank Kell and his brother-in-law, Joseph A. Kemp, both of Wichita Falls, Texas.

Frank Kell Businessman from Wichita Falls, Texas

Franklin Marian "Frank" Kell, along with his brother-in-law Joseph A. Kemp, was one of the two principal entrepreneurs in the early development of Wichita Falls, Texas.

Joseph A. Kemp American businessman from Wichita Falls, Texas

Joseph Alexander Kemp, sometimes known as Jodie Kemp, was an entrepreneur and investor who along with his brother-in-law Frank Kell is considered one of the modern founders of Wichita Falls, Texas.

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 2,928
1920 3,2049.4%
1930 2,368−26.1%
1940 2,4583.8%
1950 2,327−5.3%
1960 1,933−16.9%
1970 1,833−5.2%
1980 2,36929.2%
1990 2,088−11.9%
2000 2,1583.4%
2010 2,064−4.4%
Est. 20151,988 [9] −3.7%
[4] [7]

Geography

Waurika is located in northwestern Jefferson County at 34°10′12″N98°0′5″W / 34.17000°N 98.00139°W / 34.17000; -98.00139 (34.170130, -98.001268). [10] U.S. Route 70 passes through the southern side of the city, leading east 49 miles (79 km) to Ardmore and west 27 miles (43 km) to Randlett. U.S. Route 81 crosses US 70 in the southeastern corner of Waurika, leading north 26 miles (42 km) to Duncan and south 24 miles (39 km) to Ringgold. Oklahoma State Highway 5 (Waurika's Main Street) leads northwest 19 miles (31 km) to Temple. Waurika is about 109 miles (175 km) southwest of Oklahoma City. [7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, Waurika has a total area of 12.5 square miles (32.4 km2), of which 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2), or 0.08%, are water. [11] The city center lies on the east side of the valley of Beaver Creek, a south-flowing tributary of the Red River.

Waurika Lake is 6 miles (10 km) northwest of the city center. [12]

Economy

Waurika's economy has largely been based on cattle raising, agriculture and petroleum production since the founding of the city. [7]

Demographics

As of the census [1] of 2000, there were 1,988 people, 741 households, and 500 families residing in the city. The population density was 168.0 people per square mile (64.9/km²). There were 929 housing units at an average density of 78.5 per square mile (30.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.41% White, 1.81% African American, 4.28% Native American, 3.37% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 2.36% from other races, and 2.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.00% of the population.

There were 741 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the city, the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 107.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $23,800, and the median income for a family was $31,594. Males had a median income of $24,844 versus $16,286 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,496. About 6.4% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 17.4% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Waurika has a home rule charter form of government. [7]

Notable people and places

There is a Chisholm Trail Historical Museum in Waurika.

Notable events

The 1996 murder of Heather Rich brought notoriety to Waurika. Rich, a 16-year-old sophomore at the local high school, was murdered by two classmates and an acquaintance in a case that attracted national media coverage.

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References

  1. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. 1 2 "Census Viewer: Waurika, Oklahoma Population". Moonshadow Mobile, Inc. Retrieved February 18, 2016.
  5. MY GRANDMOTHER RAISED 500 PARAKEETS AT A TIME IN A LITTLE HOUSE. SHE WAS ONE OF MANY BREEDERS IN THAT TOWN IN THE 1970S. IT WAS INDEED CALLED THIS. Etter, Jim. "Catchy Slogans Strive to Put Towns on Map." The Oklahoman. October 20, 1985. Accessed November 3, 2016.
  6. William Bright. 2013. Native American Placenames of the Southwest (Univ. of Oklahoma Press)
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Sheridan B. Drowatzky, "Waurika," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, 2009. Accessed March 27, 2015.
  8. "H. Allen Anderson, "Wichita Falls and Southern Railroad"". tshaonline.org. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  9. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2016.
  10. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  11. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Waurika city, Oklahoma". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  12. Google Maps