Kingfisher, Oklahoma

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Kingfisher, Oklahoma
Downtown Kingfisher, OK September 2014.jpg
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Kingfisher
Location in Oklahoma and the United States
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Kingfisher
Kingfisher (the United States)
Coordinates: 35°51′22″N97°56′4″W / 35.85611°N 97.93444°W / 35.85611; -97.93444 Coordinates: 35°51′22″N97°56′4″W / 35.85611°N 97.93444°W / 35.85611; -97.93444
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Kingfisher
Area
[1]
  Total4.09 sq mi (10.60 km2)
  Land4.04 sq mi (10.48 km2)
  Water0.05 sq mi (0.13 km2)
Elevation
1,053 ft (321 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total4,633
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
4,908
  Density1,213.35/sq mi (468.46/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
73750
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-39850 [3]
GNIS feature ID1094390 [4]
Website kingfisher.org

Kingfisher is a city in and the county seat of Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, United States. [5] The population was 4,633 at the 2010 census, [6] up from the figure of 4,380 in 2000. It is the former home and namesake of Kingfisher College. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Kingfisher is now primarily a bedroom community for people employed in Enid and Oklahoma City. [7]

Contents

History

Kingfisher came into existence on April 22, 1889, when land owned by the federal government was opened to settlement by "land run". A huge area in what is now central Oklahoma was literally "peopled" by Americans overnight. The city is situated on a part of the Chisholm Trail, over which millions of Texas longhorns were driven to railheads in Kansas in the years immediately following the Civil War. Extension of the railroads and settlement of the open range ended this colorful era.

The town was named for an early resident who several landmarks were named for, a man named King Fisher. [8]

The bill that opened Oklahoma Territory to non-Indian settlement limited the sizes of townsites to 320 acres (130 ha). Settlers in the Kingfisher area formed two communities: Kingfisher City, on the north side of the settlement, and Lisbon, on the south side. The two merged on June 14, 1890, and the resulting town was named Kingfisher. Oklahoma Territory was organized May 2, 1890, and consisted of the Unassigned Lands and the Panhandle. The Western District included present-day Kingfisher County, part of Canadian County and the Panhandle. Abraham Jefferson Seay, a Missouri native, was appointed as District Judge and moved to Kingfisher. In 1892, Seay was appointed as the second territorial governor by President Benjamin Harrison. [7]

The Kingfisher County Development Foundation was created in 1958 for the purpose of assisting and promoting industrial, economic and civic growth within, and surrounding the Kingfisher area of Oklahoma.A present K.C.D.F. strategy includes the investment for development of the Kingfisher Industrial Park. The industrial park is located just south of Kingfisher, further closing the gap between Oklahoma City and Kingfisher. Kingfisher has quickly become a suburban community of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area, already home to many commuters to Oklahoma City. Kingfisher is a Certified City and has received a Community Development Block Grant to inventory infrastructure features for Capital Improvement Planning (CIP).[ citation needed ]

On August 19, 2007, the city was 25% flooded when Kingfisher Creek and Uncle John Creek overflowed their banks, the result of heavy rain from Tropical Depression Erin. One woman died in the flood. [9]

The Coleman Company was founded in Kingfisher by W. C. Coleman in 1900.

Geography

Kingfisher is located south-central Kingfisher County at 35°51′22″N97°56′04″W / 35.856216°N 97.934517°W / 35.856216; -97.934517 . [10] It is 42 miles (68 km) northwest of Oklahoma City. [7] U.S. Route 81 (Main Street) passes through the center of town, leading north 38 miles (61 km) to Enid and south 23 miles (37 km) to El Reno. Oklahoma State Highway 3 (Broadway Avenue) crosses US 81 in the center of town, leading east 29 miles (47 km) to Guthrie and west 27 miles (43 km) to Watonga.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Kingfisher has a total area of 4.1 square miles (10.6 km2), of which 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 1.21%, are water. [6] The city is drained by Kingfisher Creek, a northeast-flowing tributary of the Cimarron River.

Climate

Climate data for Kingfisher, Oklahoma
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)85
(29)
93
(34)
100
(38)
103
(39)
105
(41)
113
(45)
115
(46)
118
(48)
110
(43)
101
(38)
90
(32)
88
(31)
118
(48)
Average high °F (°C)47.4
(8.6)
53.8
(12.1)
63.3
(17.4)
72.4
(22.4)
80.5
(26.9)
89.5
(31.9)
95.2
(35.1)
94.3
(34.6)
85.8
(29.9)
74.9
(23.8)
60.0
(15.6)
49.9
(9.9)
72.4
(22.4)
Average low °F (°C)24.5
(−4.2)
29.4
(−1.4)
37.8
(3.2)
46.7
(8.2)
56.7
(13.7)
65.8
(18.8)
70.5
(21.4)
69.2
(20.7)
61.4
(16.3)
49.7
(9.8)
37.1
(2.8)
27.8
(−2.3)
48.2
(9.0)
Record low °F (°C)−16
(−27)
−20
(−29)
−3
(−19)
15
(−9)
28
(−2)
45
(7)
51
(11)
44
(7)
29
(−2)
12
(−11)
6
(−14)
−14
(−26)
−20
(−29)
Average precipitation inches (mm)1.14
(29)
1.51
(38)
2.66
(68)
3.23
(82)
5.01
(127)
4.32
(110)
2.22
(56)
2.75
(70)
3.53
(90)
2.57
(65)
2.38
(60)
1.63
(41)
32.95
(837)
Average snowfall inches (cm)1.8
(4.6)
0.7
(1.8)
0.1
(0.25)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.3
(0.76)
1.1
(2.8)
4.1
(10)
Average relative humidity (%)72707169736960606569737569
Source: Oklahoma Climatological Survey [11]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 1,134
1900 2,301102.9%
1910 2,53810.3%
1920 2,446−3.6%
1930 2,72611.4%
1940 3,35223.0%
1950 3,345−0.2%
1960 3,249−2.9%
1970 4,04224.4%
1980 4,2455.0%
1990 4,095−3.5%
2000 4,3807.0%
2010 4,6335.8%
2019 (est.)4,908 [2] 5.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [12]

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,633 people, 1,804 households, and 1,217 families residing in the city. [13] The racial makeup of the city was 83.9% White, 1.6% African American, 3.8% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 6.9% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.4% of the population. [13]

There were 1,804 households, out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families while 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals. [13] The average household size was 2.5 and the average family size was 3.06. The median age was 37 years. 52.1% of the population was female and 47.9% male. [13]

As of the 2013 American Community Survey, the median income for a household in the city was $49,727, and the median income for a family was $59,408. [14] Males had a median full-time income of $49,444 versus $32,996 for females. [14] The per capita income for the city was $24,363. [14] About 7.7% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.9% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over. [14]

Places of interest

Kingfisher's only permanent tourist attraction is the Chisholm Trail Museum, which houses the Gov. Seay Mansion. This facility preserves relics and information of the community's unique heritage.[ citation needed ]

Government

Kingfisher has a commission-manager government. [7]

Notable people

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  6. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Kingfisher city, Oklahoma". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  7. 1 2 3 4 McIntyre, Glen. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Kingfisher." Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  8. Alley, John. City Beginnings in Oklahoma Territory. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 1939.
  9. KWTV August 19, 2007
  10. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. "The Climate of Kingfisher County" (PDF).
  12. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  13. 1 2 3 4 DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010--2010 Demographic Profile Data Archived 2015-04-28 at archive.today United States Census Bureau, retrieved April 27, 2015.
  14. 1 2 3 4 DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics: 2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates Archived 2015-04-28 at archive.today , United States Census Bureau, retrieved April 27, 2015.
  15. "Benson, George S. | 1972". oklahomahof.com.
  16. "Former Kingfisher TE Jace Sternberger commits to Texas A&M". December 10, 2017.
  17. Wilson, Linda D. "T.G.&Y. Stores." Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Accessed August 2, 2017.