Idabel, Oklahoma

Last updated
Idabel, Oklahoma
Idabel August 2018 08 (Idabel City Hall).jpg
Idabel City Hall
Nickname(s): 
Dogwood Capital of Oklahoma
OKMap-doton-Idabel.PNG
Location of Idabel, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 33°53′44″N94°49′35″W / 33.89556°N 94.82639°W / 33.89556; -94.82639 Coordinates: 33°53′44″N94°49′35″W / 33.89556°N 94.82639°W / 33.89556; -94.82639 [1]
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County McCurtain
Government
  TypeMayor-council
Area
  Total15.9 sq mi (41.3 km2)
  Land15.9 sq mi (41.3 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
[1]
472 ft (144 m)
Population
  Total7,010
  Density440/sq mi (170/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
74745
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-36750 [2]
GNIS feature ID1101480 [1]
Website www.idabel-ok.gov

Idabel is a city in and county seat of McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 7,010 at the 2010 census. [3] It is located in the southeast corner of Oklahoma, a tourist area known as Kiamichi Country.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

McCurtain County, Oklahoma County in the United States

McCurtain County is located in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,151. Its county seat is Idabel. It was formed at statehood from part of the earlier Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory. The name honors an influential Choctaw family that lived in the area. Green McCurtain was the last chief when the Choctaw Nation was dissolved before Oklahoma became a state in 1907.

Oklahoma State of the United States of America

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

Contents

History

Part of downtown Idabel Another view of downtown Idabel, OK IMG 8501.JPG
Part of downtown Idabel
Martha A. Johnson Library in Idabel Idabel August 2018 07 (Martha A. Johnson Idabel Public Library).jpg
Martha A. Johnson Library in Idabel

Idabel was established in 1902 by the Arkansas and Choctaw Railway (later part of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway (Frisco)). The city was first named Purnell, after Isaac Purnell, a railroad official. When postal officials rejected that designation, the name was changed to Mitchell, honoring another railroad company officer. Postal officials also rejected because another post office of that name existed elsewhere in the territory. They named the post office Bokhoma (a Choctaw word meaning Red River), which opened December 15, 1902. Railroad officials then chose the name Idabel, a compound of the names of Isaac Purnell's two daughters, Ida and Bell. The post office was then renamed Idabel. [4]

For its first four years, Idabel local government was the responsibility of the Choctaw tribe for the Indians themselves. The national government was responsible for enforcing the law among non-Choctaws. In 1906, the citizens elected their first mayor and established a mayor-council form of government. At the time of statehood, November 16, 1907, the town was designated as the county seat of McCurtain County. A census in that year reported 726 residents. By 1910, the population had grown to 1,493. In 1920, there were 3,617 residents, but the number fell to 2,581 in 1930. Growth resumed by the end of the Great Depression in the late 1930s. [4]

Great Depression 20th-century worldwide economic depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.

Geography

Idabel lies between the Little River and the Red River, about 21 miles (34 km) west of the Oklahoma-Arkansas state line and 40 miles (64 km) east of Hugo. [4] U.S. Routes 70 and 259 pass through the city. [5]

Little River (Red River tributary) river in Oklahoma and Arkansas, United States of America

The Little River is a tributary of the Red River, with a total length of 217 miles (349 km), 130 miles (210 km) in southeastern Oklahoma and 87 miles (140 km) in southwestern Arkansas. in southeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Arkansas in the United States. Via the Red, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. Six large reservoirs impound the Little River and its tributaries. The drainage basin of the river totals 4,204 square miles (10,890 km2), 2,204 square miles (5,710 km2) in Oklahoma and 2,036 square miles (5,270 km2) in Arkansas. The Little River and its upper tributaries are popular for recreational canoeing and kayaking.

Red River of the South major tributary of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers in the southern United States

The Red River, or sometimes the Red River of the South, is a major river in the southern United States of America. It was named for the red-bed country of its watershed. It is one of several rivers with that name. Although it was once a tributary of the Mississippi River, the Red River is now a tributary of the Atchafalaya River, a distributary of the Mississippi that flows separately into the Gulf of Mexico. It is connected to the Mississippi River by the Old River Control Structure.

U.S. Route 70 highway in the United States

U.S. Route 70 is an east–west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles (3,838 km) from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. As can be derived from its number, it is a major east–west highway of the Southern and Southwestern United States. It formerly ran from coast to coast, with the current Eastern terminus near the Atlantic Ocean in North Carolina, and the former Western terminus near the Pacific Ocean in California. Before the completion of the Interstate system, U.S. Highway 70 was sometimes referred to as the "Broadway of America", due to its status as one of the main east–west thoroughfares in the nation. It was also promoted as the "Treasure Trail" by the U.S. Highway 70 Association as of 1951.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.9 square miles (41 km2), of which, 15.9 square miles (41 km2) of it is land and 0.06% is water. [6]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Idabel has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [7]

Humid subtropical climate category in the Köppen climate classification system

A humid subtropical climate is a zone of climate characterized by hot and humid summers, and mild winters. These climates normally lie on the southeast side of all continents, generally between latitudes 25° and 40° and are located poleward from adjacent tropical climates. While many subtropical climates tend to be located at or near coastal locations, in some cases they extend inland, most notably in China and the United States, where they exhibit more pronounced seasonal variations and sharper contrasts between summer and winter, as part of a gradient between the more tropical climates of the southern coasts of these countries and the more continental climates of China and the United States’ northern and central regions.

Climate data for Idabel, OK 1981-2010, extremes 1907-2017
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)87
(31)
89
(32)
94
(34)
97
(36)
99
(37)
107
(42)
111
(44)
114
(46)
109
(43)
101
(38)
89
(32)
82
(28)
114
(46)
Average high °F (°C)53.4
(11.9)
59.0
(15.0)
66.5
(19.2)
74.0
(23.3)
81.2
(27.3)
88.5
(31.4)
92.7
(33.7)
93.6
(34.2)
86.0
(30.0)
76.0
(24.4)
64.9
(18.3)
55.2
(12.9)
74.3
(23.5)
Average low °F (°C)29.0
(−1.7)
34.0
(1.1)
41.1
(5.1)
47.9
(8.8)
58.3
(14.6)
66.7
(19.3)
70.1
(21.2)
69.4
(20.8)
61.5
(16.4)
50.2
(10.1)
40.1
(4.5)
31.4
(−0.3)
50.0
(10.0)
Record low °F (°C)−6
(−21)
−11
(−24)
9
(−13)
21
(−6)
31
(−1)
45
(7)
53
(12)
49
(9)
36
(2)
23
(−5)
11
(−12)
−2
(−19)
−11
(−24)
Average precipitation inches (mm)3.14
(80)
4.05
(103)
4.87
(124)
4.12
(105)
6.37
(162)
4.25
(108)
3.87
(98)
2.69
(68)
4.15
(105)
5.59
(142)
5.12
(130)
4.79
(122)
53.01
(1,347)
Average snowfall inches (cm)0.6
(1.5)
0.9
(2.3)
0.2
(0.51)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.1
(0.25)
1.8
(4.56)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)889810876798997
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)0.30.30.10.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.10.10.9
Source: NWS Nowdata for Idabel (Shreveport Area)

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 1,493
1920 3,067105.4%
1930 2,581−15.8%
1940 3,68942.9%
1950 4,67126.6%
1960 4,9676.3%
1970 5,94619.7%
1980 7,62228.2%
1990 6,957−8.7%
2000 7,65810.1%
2010 7,010−8.5%
Est. 20157,007 [8] 0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census [2] of 2000, there were 7,658 people, 2,735 households, and 1,785 families residing in the city. The population density was 436.3 people per square mile (168.5/km²). There were 3,129 housing units at an average density of 196.4 per square mile (75.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 56.99% White, 24.45% African American, 10.44% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 3.37% from other races, and 4.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.96% of the population.

There were 2,735 households out of which 34.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.6% were married couples living together, 21.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city, the population was spread out with 29.5% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $20,496, and the median income for a family was $24,189. Males had a median income of $24,182 versus $16,958 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,241. About 28.7% of families and 31.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.5% of those under age 18 and 18.4% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Initially, timber was the basis for the local economy, but this was supplanted by cotton production after the nearby forests were cleared. One cotton gin operated in Idabel in 1904, but six were in business in 1930. However, the Great Depression, depleted soil and destructive pests essentially wiped out this industry around Idabel. Landowners converted their properties to pastures and expanded beef production. Chicken farms were also established in the area and marginal agricultural land was turned into pine plantations. [4]

Education

Idabel train station Idabel August 2018 30 (Idabel Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture - Frisco Station).jpg
Idabel train station
The former State Theater, across from the courthouse in Idabel, houses a law office, the Legal Arts Building. Former State Theater in Idabel, OK IMG 8500.JPG
The former State Theater, across from the courthouse in Idabel, houses a law office, the Legal Arts Building.
McCurtain Daily Gazette office in Idabel Idabel August 2018 27 (McCurtain Daily Gazette).jpg
McCurtain Daily Gazette office in Idabel

Public schools

Idabel Public Schools serves the community.

Advanced education

Notable people

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References

  1. 1 2 3 U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Idabel, Oklahoma
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. 1 2 3 4 Coleman, Louis. "Idabel," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture Oklahoma Historical Society, Accessed September 3, 2015.
  5. Oklahoma Atlas & Gazetteer, DeLorme, 1st ed., 1998, p.67 ISBN   0899332838
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. Climate Summary for Idabel, Oklahoma
  8. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2016.
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