Nowata, Oklahoma

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Nowata, Oklahoma

Nuwatu, Nuwi ta
Mural in Nowata Oklahoma 6-7-2009.jpg
Mural in Nowata
OKMap-doton-Nowata.PNG
Location of Nowata within Oklahoma
Coordinates: 36°41′43″N95°38′15″W / 36.69528°N 95.63750°W / 36.69528; -95.63750 Coordinates: 36°41′43″N95°38′15″W / 36.69528°N 95.63750°W / 36.69528; -95.63750
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Nowata
Area
  Total3.1 sq mi (8.0 km2)
  Land3.1 sq mi (8.0 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
709 ft (216 m)
Population
  Total3,989
  Density1,300/sq mi (500/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
74048
Area code(s) 539/918
FIPS code 40-52900 [1]
GNIS feature ID1096069 [2]

Nowata (Lenape: Nuwatu, Nuwi ta [3] ) is a city and county seat of Nowata County, Oklahoma, United States. [4] The population was 3,731 at the United States Census, 2010, a 6.0 percent decline from 3,971 at the 2000 census. [5] The area where it was established was then part of the Cherokee Nation in Indian Territory.

Unami language language

Unami is an Algonquian language spoken by the Lenape people in the late 17th century and the early 18th century, in what then was the southern two-thirds of New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania and the northern two-thirds of Delaware, but later in Ontario and Oklahoma. It is one of the two Delaware languages, the other being Munsee. The last fluent speaker in the United States, Edward Thompson, of the Delaware Tribe of Indians, died on 31 August 2002. His sister Nora Thompson Dean (1907–1984) provided valuable information about the language to linguists and other scholars.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Nowata County, Oklahoma County in the United States

Nowata County is a county located in northeastern Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,536. Its county seat is Nowata. The county name is derived from a Delaware word "no-we-ata," meaning "come here" or "welcome." It is located on the Kansas border.

Contents

History

The first community established at this site was named Metz, named for its first postmaster, Fred Metzner. The name was changed even before the railroad was built in 1889. [6] Nowata served as a train stop for Native Americans from the East being resettled by the government. Some controversy exists about the meaning of the town name. The Lenape tribesmen who passed through named it "nuwita," meaning "friendly" or "welcome." [7] In the Cherokee language, the town is called ᎠᎹᏗᎧᏂᎬᎬ (A-ma-di-ka-ni-gunh-gunh, roughly), which means, "water is all gone," translating what it sounded like the word meant: No Water. [8]

Lenape indigenous people originally from Lenapehoking, now the Mid-Atlantic United States

The Lenape, also called the Leni Lenape, Lenni Lenape and Delaware people, are an indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands, who live in Canada and the United States. Their historical territory included present-day New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania along the Delaware River watershed, New York City, western Long Island, and the Lower Hudson Valley. Today, Lenape people belong to the Delaware Nation and Delaware Tribe of Indians in Oklahoma; the Stockbridge-Munsee Community in Wisconsin; and the Munsee-Delaware Nation, Moravian of the Thames First Nation, and Delaware of Six Nations in Ontario.

Cherokee language Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee people

Cherokee is an endangered Iroquoian language and the native language of the Cherokee people. There are approximately 22,000 Cherokee speakers out of more than 300,000 tribal members. It is the only Southern Iroquoian language and differs significantly from the other Iroquoian languages. Cherokee is a polysynthetic language and uses a unique syllabary writing system.

In 1889, the Kansas and Arkansas Valley Railway (later part of the Missouri Pacific Railway) built a line through Nowata. A post office was established in the town on November 8, 1889. Nowata was incorporated April 17, 1899. By 1900, Nowata had 498 residents. [7]

Oil and gas were discovered nearby in 1904, stimulating the Nowata economy. The find established Nowata as "...a region (having) a reputation for being the world's largest shallow oil field." Some wells in this field have continued to produce into the twenty-first century. [7]

A Federal court was established in 1904, and met on the third floor of the new building owned by the First National Bank of Nowata. The building housing the court burned down in 1909, destroying all records and forcing the court to move temporarily to another building. When Oklahoma became a state on November 16, 1907, Nowata County was created and named for the city, which was designated as the county seat. By that time, the city population had climbed to 2,233. A permanent Nowata County Courthouse was completed in 1912, and remains in use at present. It is the only local property listed on the National Record of Historic Places. [7]

Nowata's peak population was 4,435 in 1920. The city became the southern terminus of the Union Electric Railway, which continued to serve the city until 1948. Newspapers included the Nowata Herald and the Nowata Advertiser.. The town had 850 telephones by 1930. However, the 1930 census showed the first population decline in the city's history, to nearly the 1910 level.

Geography

Nowata is located at 36°41′43″N95°38′15″W / 36.69528°N 95.63750°W / 36.69528; -95.63750 (36.695409, -95.637546). [9] It is 51 miles (82 km) north of Tulsa and 21 miles (34 km) south of the Kansas state line. [7] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.1 square miles (8.0 km2), all land.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Climate

Nowata is the home of the coldest temperature ever recorded in the state of Oklahoma. A thermometer at an Oklahoma Mesonet site in Nowata recorded a low temperature of -31 °F on the morning of February 10, 2011. [10] A week later, the high temperature was 79 °F, 110 degrees higher. [11]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 498
1910 3,672637.3%
1920 4,43520.8%
1930 3,531−20.4%
1940 3,90410.6%
1950 3,9651.6%
1960 4,1635.0%
1970 3,679−11.6%
1980 4,27016.1%
1990 3,896−8.8%
2000 3,9711.9%
2010 3,731−6.0%
Est. 20153,743 [12] 0.3%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census [1] of 2000, there were 3,971 people, 1,622 households, and 1,026 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,280.5 people per square mile (494.6/km²). There were 1,853 housing units at an average density of 597.5 per square mile (230.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 70.08% White, 4.66% African American, 16.02% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.38% from other races, and 8.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.18% of the population.

There were 1,622 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.7% were non-families. 33.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city, the population was spread out with 25.6% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 21.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $23,835, and the median income for a family was $31,836. Males had a median income of $26,556 versus $18,989 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,633. About 11.6% of families and 19.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.0% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

Government

The city has a council-manager form of government. [7]

Economy

At the beginning of the 21st Century, Nowata had 130 different businesses. The most notable was the forty-bed Jane Phillips Nowata Health Center. The weekly Nowata Star newspaper kept readers informed about local events and issues. [7]

Filmography

Nowata was the setting for the 1998 movie Possums (film). In the movie, a man played by Mac Davis tries to bring back the town's cancelled high school football program. Scenes were filmed in town and guest starred Barry Switzer and many locals.

Notable people

See also

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Lenapah, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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References

  1. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. "Lenape Talking Dictionary" . Retrieved 2012-05-27.
  4. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. "MuniNet Guide: Nowata, Oklahoma" . Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  6. Cheatham, Glen. "Nowata County." Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bamberg, Maxine. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Nowata" Retrieved September 30, 2011.
  8. Holmes, Ruth Bradley and Smith, Betty Sharp. Beginning Cherokee, 2nd Edition. University of Oklahoma Press, 1977.
  9. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. "Record low temperatures in Oklahoma, Missouri and Texas". Reuters. February 10, 2011.
  11. https://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thelookout/20110218/us_yblog_thelookout/temperature-swings-100-degrees-in-one-week-in-okla-town
  12. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2016.