Guthrie, Oklahoma

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Guthrie, Oklahoma
Downtown-guthrie-oklahoma.jpg
Downtown Guthrie
USA Oklahoma location map.svg
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Guthrie
Location within Oklahoma
Usa edcp relief location map.png
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Guthrie
Location within the United States
Coordinates: 35°51′23″N97°26′9″W / 35.85639°N 97.43583°W / 35.85639; -97.43583 Coordinates: 35°51′23″N97°26′9″W / 35.85639°N 97.43583°W / 35.85639; -97.43583
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Logan
Government
  Type Council-Manager
   Mayor Steve Gentling
Area
  Total19.2 sq mi (49.8 km2)
  Land18.7 sq mi (48.4 km2)
  Water0.5 sq mi (1.4 km2)
Elevation
981 ft (299 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total10,191
  Estimate 
(2018) [1]
11,437
  Density531.6/sq mi (205.3/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (CST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
73044
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-31700 [2]
GNIS feature ID1093447 [3]
Website cityofguthrie.com
Guthrie Historic District
Guthrie Oklahoma start.jpg
Tent city on April 24, 1889, the second day after the opening. Two lower images are on May 10, 1889 and 1893 respectively.
USA Oklahoma location map.svg
Red pog.svg
LocationGuthrie, Oklahoma
Coordinates 35°51′23″N97°26′9″W / 35.85639°N 97.43583°W / 35.85639; -97.43583
Built1927-29
NRHP reference # 74001664 [4]
Significant dates
Designated NRHPJune 13, 1974
Designated NHLJanuary 20, 1999

Guthrie is a city and county seat in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City Metroplex. The population was 10,191 at the 2010 census, a 2.7 percent increase from the 9,925 at the 2000 census. [5]

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Logan County, Oklahoma U.S. county in Oklahoma

Logan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,848. Its county seat is Guthrie.

Oklahoma U.S. state in the United States

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south and west, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the 50 United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

Contents

First known as a railroad station stop, after the Land Run of 1889, Guthrie immediately gained 10,000 new residents who began to develop the town. It was rapidly improved and was designated as the territorial capital, and in 1907 as the first state capital of Oklahoma. In 1910 state voters chose the larger Oklahoma City as the new capital in a special election.

In the United States, an unorganized territory is a region of land under U.S. Sovereignty that is not within the bounds of a U.S. state and that is without a government established by the United States Congress through an organic act. The term was historically applied either to a newly acquired region not yet constituted as an organized incorporated territory, or to a region previously part of an organized incorporated territory left "unorganized" after part of it had been organized and achieved the requirements for statehood. The U.S. currently exercises sovereignty over ten unorganized territories: American Samoa, Baker Island, Howland Island, Jarvis Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Midway Atoll, Navassa Island, Palmyra Atoll and Wake Island.

Oklahoma City Capital of Oklahoma

Oklahoma City, often shortened to OKC, is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County, the city ranks 27th among United States cities in population. The population grew following the 2010 Census, with the population estimated to have increased to 649,021 as of July 2018. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,396,445, and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,469,124 residents, making it Oklahoma's largest municipality and metropolitan area by population.

Guthrie is nationally significant for its collection of late 19th and early 20th century commercial architecture. The Guthrie Historic District includes more than 2,000 buildings and is designated as a National Historic Landmark. Historic tourism is important to the city, and its Victorian architecture provides a backdrop for Wild West and territorial-style entertainment, carriage tours, replica trolley cars, specialty shops, and art galleries.

Guthrie Historic District (Guthrie, Oklahoma) United States historic place

The Guthrie Historic District (GHD) is a National Historic Landmark District encompassing the commercial core of Guthrie, Oklahoma, US. According to its National Historic Landmark Nomination it is roughly bounded by Oklahoma Avenue on the north, Broad Street on the east, Harrison Avenue on the south, and the railroad tracks on the west; it also includes 301 W. Harrison Avenue. The National Historic Landmarks Program on-line document describes the boundaries as "14th Street, College Avenue, Pine Street and Lincoln Avenue. One building, the Logan County Courthouse, is at 301 E. Harrison Avenue, outside the main boundaries of the GHD," This article relies on the former source, which is more detailed. According to the 1998 nomination, the proposed district covered 31 acres (13 ha). The nomination included 112 resources, classed as 69 contributing buildings, 38 non-contributing buildings, 1 non-contributing structure and 3 noncontributing objects. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1999 for its historic significance as the first capital of the Oklahoma Territory and of Oklahoma.

National Historic Landmark formal designation assigned by the United States federal government to historic buildings and sites in the United States

A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Only some 2,500 (~3%) of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places are recognized as National Historic Landmarks.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

History

Oklahoma State Capital Company Building in Guthrie State Capital Company Building in Guthrie, Oklahoma (2013).jpg
Oklahoma State Capital Company Building in Guthrie

Guthrie was established in 1887 as a railroad station called Deer Creek on the Southern Kansas Railway (later acquired by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway) running from the KansasOklahoma border to Purcell. [6] The name was later changed to Guthrie, named for jurist John Guthrie of Topeka, Kansas. A post office was established on April 4, 1889. [7]

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Large railroad company in the United States.

The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, often referred to as the Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

Kansas U.S. state in the United States

Kansas is a U.S. state in the Midwestern United States. Its capital is Topeka and its largest city is Wichita, with its most populated county being Johnson County. Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north; Missouri on the east; Oklahoma on the south; and Colorado on the west. Kansas is named after the Kansas River, which in turn was named after the Kansa Native Americans who lived along its banks. The tribe's name is often said to mean "people of the (south) wind" although this was probably not the term's original meaning. For thousands of years, what is now Kansas was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys. Tribes in the western part of the state were semi-nomadic and hunted large herds of bison.

Purcell, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Purcell is a city in and the county seat of McClain County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 5,884.

In 1889 some fifty thousand potential settlers gathered at the edges of the Unassigned Lands in hopes of staking a claim to a plot. At noon on April 22, 1889, cannons resounded at a 2-million acre (8,100 km²) section of Indian Territory, launching president Benjamin Harrison's "Hoss Race" or Land Run of 1889. People ran for both farmlands and towns.

Unassigned Lands lands in Oklahoma that were not assigned to any native tribes

The Unassigned Lands in Oklahoma were in the center of the lands ceded to the United States by the Creek (Muskogee) and Seminole Indians following the Civil War and on which no other tribes had been settled. By 1883 it was bounded by the Cherokee Outlet on the north, several relocated Indian reservations on the east, the Chickasaw lands on the south, and the Cheyenne-Arapaho reserve on the west. The area amounted to 1,887,796.47 acres.

Indian Territory U.S. 17th-, 18th- and early-20th-century territory set aside by the United States Government for the relocation of the indigenous peoples of the Americas

As general terms, Indian Territory, the Indian Territories, or Indian country describe an evolving land area set aside by the United States Government for the relocation of Native Americans who held aboriginal title to their land. In general, the tribes ceded land they occupied in exchange for land grants in 1803. The concept of an Indian Territory was an outcome of the 18th- and 19th-century policy of Indian removal. After the Civil War (1861–1865), the policy of the government was one of assimilation.

Benjamin Harrison 23rd President of the United States

Benjamin Harrison was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd president of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He was a grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison, creating the only grandfather–grandson duo to have held the office. He was also a great-grandson of Benjamin Harrison V, a founding father who signed the United States Declaration of Independence. Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison had established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader, and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served in the Union Army as a colonel, and was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers in 1865. Harrison unsuccessfully ran for governor of Indiana in 1876. The Indiana General Assembly elected Harrison to a six-year term in the U.S. Senate, where he served from 1881 to 1887.

During the next six hours, about 10,000 people settled in what became the capital of the new Territory of Oklahoma. Within months, Guthrie was developed as a modern brick and stone "Queen of the Prairie" with municipal water, electricity, a mass transit system, and underground parking garages for horses and carriages. Hobart Johnstone Whitley, also known as HJ and the 'Father of Hollywood,' was the first president of the Guthrie Chamber of Commerce. Whitley built the first brick block building in the territory for his National Loan & Trust Company. He was asked by the local people to be the first Governor of Oklahoma. Whitley traveled to Washington, D.C. where he persuaded the U.S. Congress to allow Guthrie to be the new capital of the future state of Oklahoma. This was specified in the 1906 Oklahoma Enabling Act, which established certain requirements for the new state constitution. [8] By 1907, when Guthrie became the state capital, it looked like a well-established Eastern city.

Water supply network system of engineered hydrologic and hydraulic components which provide water supply

A water supply network or water supply system is a system of engineered hydrologic and hydraulic components which provide water supply. A water supply system typically includes:

  1. A drainage basin.
  2. A raw water collection point where the water accumulates, such as a lake, a river, or groundwater from an underground aquifer. Raw water may be transferred using uncovered ground-level aqueducts, covered tunnels or underground water pipes to water purification facilities.
  3. Water purification facilities. Treated water is transferred using water pipes.
  4. Water storage facilities such as reservoirs, water tanks, or water towers. Smaller water systems may store the water in cisterns or pressure vessels. Tall buildings may also need to store water locally in pressure vessels in order for the water to reach the upper floors.
  5. Additional water pressurizing components such as pumping stations may need to be situated at the outlet of underground or above ground reservoirs or cisterns.
  6. A pipe network for distribution of water to the consumers and other usage points.
  7. Connections to the sewers are generally found downstream of the water consumers, but the sewer system is considered to be a separate system, rather than part of the water supply system.
Public transport Shared transportation service for use by the general public

Public transport is a system of transport for passengers by group travel systems available for use by the general public, typically managed on a schedule, operated on established routes, and that charge a posted fee for each trip. Examples of public transport include city buses, trolleybuses, trams and passenger trains, rapid transit and ferries. Public transport between cities is dominated by airlines, coaches, and intercity rail. High-speed rail networks are being developed in many parts of the world.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, D.C., or the district, is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first president of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city, located on the Potomac River bordering Maryland and Virginia, is one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Guthrie prospered as the administrative center of the territory, but it was eclipsed in economic influence by Oklahoma City early in the 20th century. Oklahoma City had become a major junction for several railroads and had also attracted a major industry in the form of meat packing. Oklahoma City business leaders began campaigning soon after statehood to make Oklahoma City the new state capital, and in 1910 a special election was held to determine the location of the state capital. 96,488 votes were cast for Oklahoma City; 31,031 for Guthrie; and 8,382 for Shawnee. [9] Governor Charles N. Haskell, who was in Tulsa on the day of the election, ordered his secretary W.B. Anthony to have Oklahoma Secretary of State Bill Cross obtain the state seal and transport it to Oklahoma City, despite having been served a restraining order by Logan County Sheriff John Mahoney blocking the transfer. [10] [11] [12] [13] Anthony obtained written authorization from Cross, retrieved the seal from the Logan County courthouse, and delivered it to Oklahoma City. [10]

After the capital was transferred, Guthrie lost much of its government-related business and numerous residents. It began to dwindle in size and soon lost its status as Oklahoma's second-largest city, initially to Muskogee, then later to Tulsa. A challenge to the new state capital was heard in the Oklahoma Supreme Court; it upheld the election and move in its ruling on February 9, 1911, [14] as did the United States Supreme Court in 1911. [15]

The center district of Guthrie was designated a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service in 1999, in recognition of the city's importance to state history, as well as its rich architecture.

Today

As a result of Guthrie's early loss of prominence, it has a well-preserved Victorian enclave. Whereas growth and inattentive urban planning caused other Oklahoma towns such as Oklahoma City to destroy much of their early downtown architecture, much of the entire central business and residential district of Guthrie is intact.

The National Finals Steer Roping Rodeo is held in Guthrie. On six occasions, the Texas rodeo promoter Dan Taylor was chute director for the competition in Guthrie. [16]

Historical tourism has become a significant industry for the town. Guthrie is the largest urban Historic district in Oklahoma, containing 2,169 buildings, 1,400 acres (6 km2) and 400 city blocks. Guthrie is a "Certified City;" it has received a Community Development Block Grant to inventory infrastructure features for Capital Improvement Planning.

Guthrie has two lakes to the south, Liberty Lake and Guthrie Lake. Its museums include the Oklahoma Territorial Museum, and the Guthrie Scottish Rite Masonic Temple. Guthrie also claims to be the "Bed and Breakfast capital of Oklahoma". The city hosts the Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival, which draws 15,000 visitors annually.

Guthrie has Oklahoma's oldest year-round professional theatre company, the Pollard Theatre Company. [17] With an emphasis on creative story-telling to illuminate the shared human experience, the Pollard produces six or more plays and musicals annually, enlisting artists across the United States. The annual holiday favorite is A Territorial Christmas Carol.

Guthrie is served by the Guthrie News-Leader newspaper. [18]

Geography

Guthrie lies along one of the primary corridors into Texas and Mexico, and is a four-hour drive from the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. The city is located in the Frontier Country region in the center of the state. It is about 32 miles (51 km) north of Oklahoma City. [6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 19.2 square miles (50 km2).48.4 km² (18.7 m Iti²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) of it is water. The total area is 2.81 percent water.

Guthrie is in the Sandstone Hills region of Oklahoma, known for hills of 250 to 400 feet (120 m) and oak forests [19] and an ecological region known as the Cross Timbers. [20]

Climate

Guthrie has a humid subtropical climate, with frequent variations in weather daily and seasonally, except during the consistently hot and humid summer months. Consistent winds, usually from the south or south-southeast during the summer, help temper the hotter weather. Consistent northerly winds during the winter can intensify cold periods.

Climate data for Guthrie, Oklahoma
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)48.0
(8.9)
53.8
(12.1)
64.1
(17.8)
74.4
(23.6)
81.6
(27.6)
89.3
(31.8)
95.5
(35.3)
94.9
(34.9)
86.1
(30.1)
75.7
(24.3)
61.7
(16.5)
51.1
(10.6)
73.0
(22.8)
Average low °F (°C)24.6
(−4.1)
29.5
(−1.4)
38.5
(3.6)
49.2
(9.6)
57.7
(14.3)
66.4
(19.1)
71.0
(21.7)
69.5
(20.8)
62.2
(16.8)
50.5
(10.3)
38.9
(3.8)
28.6
(−1.9)
48.9
(9.4)
Average precipitation inches (mm)1.2
(30)
1.7
(43)
2.8
(71)
2.7
(69)
5.0
(130)
4.2
(110)
2.3
(58)
2.3
(58)
4.3
(110)
2.7
(69)
2.3
(58)
1.5
(38)
32.9
(840)
Source #1: weather.com
Source #2: Weatherbase [21]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 5,333
1900 10,00687.6%
1910 11,65416.5%
1920 11,7570.9%
1930 9,582−18.5%
1940 10,0184.6%
1950 10,1130.9%
1960 9,502−6.0%
1970 9,5750.8%
1980 10,3127.7%
1990 10,5182.0%
2000 9,925−5.6%
2010 10,1912.7%
Est. 201811,437 [1] 12.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [22]

As of the census [2] of 2000, there were 9,925 people, 3,854 households, and 2,474 families residing in the city. The population density was 531.6 people per square mile (205.3/km²). There were 4,308 housing units at an average density of 230.7 per square mile (89.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 75.84% White, 15.77% African American, 2.97% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.94% from other races, and 3.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.79% of the population.

There were 3,854 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% were married couples living together, 14.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city, the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 11.5% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 86.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,460, and the median income for a family was $38,732. Males had a median income of $27,948 versus $21,186 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,774. About 9.8% of families and 17.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.1% of those under age 18 and 18.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

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References

  1. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  3. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  4. Guthrie Historic District
  5. "Census Data for Guthrie, OK.", News-Leader.com. Retrieved January 12, 2012. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 20, 2011. Retrieved January 13, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. 1 2 3 4 "Guthrie." Wilson, Linda D. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Retrieved August 10, 2014.
  7. Shirk, George H. (1966). Oklahoma Place Names, p. 94. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press.
  8. Everett, Dianna. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Enabling Act (1906)." Retrieved January 10, 2012.
  9. Franks, Kenny Arthur; Lambert, Paul F. (1997). Oklahoma: The Land and Its People. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 62. ISBN   978-0-8061-9944-3.
  10. 1 2 Dean, Michael (June 27, 2009). "Oklahoma State Capitol Moved to OKC Myths vs. Reality". Oklahoma Journeys. Oklahoma Historical Society. Retrieved February 7, 2012.
  11. Mahoney, John. "Pioneer Logan County Sheriff Dies At Guthrie".
  12. "Sheriff Attempts to Prevent Transfer of Capital". New York Tribune. June 13, 1910.
  13. Mahoney, John. "State Seal Whisked Out of Guthrie". Tulsa World Centennial.
  14. Coyle v. Smith ,113P.44(Oklahoma Supreme Court1911).
  15. Coyle v. Smith , 221U.S.559 (1911).
  16. "Dan Taylor: Former PRCA President dies at 87, November 16, 2010". Tri-State Livestock News. Retrieved August 4, 2011.
  17. The Pollard Theatre
  18. Guthrie News - Logan County's News Source, Classifieds and Business Directory since 1892
  19. Oklahoma Geography, NetState.com (accessed May 16, 2013)
  20. Ecoregions of Oklahoma (accessed May 16, 2013)
  21. "Historical Weather for Guthrie, Oklahoma, United States".
  22. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2018.
  23. "New movie films in Guthrie". Guthrie News Leader. January 1, 2015. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
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  28. https://newsok.com/article/5384981/william-h-macy-renews-his-love-for-movies-with-rudderless
  29. http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/player.php?p=powerte01