Cleveland County, Oklahoma

Last updated
Cleveland County, Oklahoma
Cleveland County Court House.jpg
Cleveland County Courthouse
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Cleveland County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Oklahoma
Map of USA OK.svg
Oklahoma's location within the U.S.
Founded1890
Named for Grover Cleveland
Seat Norman
Largest cityNorman
Area
  Total558 sq mi (1,445 km2)
  Land539 sq mi (1,396 km2)
  Water19 sq mi (49 km2), 3.5%
Population (est.)
  (2015)274,458
  Density509.2/sq mi (196.6/km2)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.clevelandcountyok.com

Cleveland County is a county in the central part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 255,755 at the 2010 census, [1] making it the third-most populous county in Oklahoma. Its county seat is Norman. [2] The county was named after U.S. President Grover Cleveland. [3]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

Central Oklahoma official tourism region of Oklahoma

Central Oklahoma is the geographical name for the central region of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It is also known by the Oklahoma Department of Tourism designation, Frontier Country, defined as the twelve-county region including Canadian, Grady, Logan, Oklahoma, Cleveland, McClain, Payne, Lincoln, Pottawatomie, Seminole, Okfuskee, and Hughes counties.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Contents

Cleveland County is part of the Oklahoma City, OK Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Oklahoma City State capital city in Oklahoma, United States

Oklahoma City, often shortened to OKC, is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County, the city ranks 27th among United States cities in population. The population grew following the 2010 Census, with the population estimated to have increased to 643,648 as of July 2017. As of 2018, the Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,396,445, and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,469,124 residents, making it Oklahoma's largest metropolitan area.

Oklahoma City metropolitan area Metropolitan area in Oklahoma, United States

The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area is an urban region in Central Oklahoma. It is the largest metropolitan area in the state of Oklahoma and contains the state capital and principal city, Oklahoma City. It is often known as the Oklahoma City Metro, Oklahoma City Metroplex, or Greater Oklahoma City in addition to the nicknames Oklahoma City is known for.

History

Originally occupied by the Quapaw tribe, the Quapaw ceded the area to the U.S. Government soon after the Louisiana Purchase in 1818. During the late 1820s and 1830s, the area was given to the Creek and Seminole tribes after their forced removal from the southeastern United States. An agreement between the two tribes resulted in this area being part of the Seminole Nation, located west of the Creek Nation.

Quapaw ethnic group

The Quapaw people are a tribe of Native Americans that coalesced in the Midwest and Ohio Valley. The Dhegiha Siouan-speaking tribe historically migrated from the Ohio Valley area to the west side of the Mississippi River and resettled in what is now the state of Arkansas; their name for themselves refers to this migration and traveling downriver.

Louisiana Purchase Acquisition by the United States of America of Frances claim to the territory of Louisiana

The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory of New France by the United States from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs ($11,250,000) and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs ($3,750,000) for a total of sixty-eight million francs. The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The territory contained land that forms Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; the portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; a large portion of North Dakota; a large portion of South Dakota; the northeastern section of New Mexico; the northern portion of Texas; the area of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River ; and small portions of land within the present Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Its non-native population was around 60,000 inhabitants, of whom half were African slaves.

The Seminole are a Native American people originally from Florida. Today, they principally live in Oklahoma with a minority in Florida, and comprise three federally recognized tribes: the Seminole Tribe of Oklahoma, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, as well as independent groups. The Seminole nation emerged in a process of ethnogenesis from various Native American groups who settled in Florida in the 18th century, most significantly northern Muscogee (Creeks) from what is now Georgia and Alabama. The word "Seminole" is derived from the Creek word simanó-li, which may itself be derived from the Spanish word cimarrón, meaning "runaway" or "wild one".

In 1866, these tribes were forced to cede the area to the Federal Government for siding with the Confederacy during the American Civil War [ citation needed ]. The area became part of the Unassigned Lands and was opened for white settlement on April 22, 1889.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The most studied and written about episode in U.S. history, the Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Unassigned Lands lands in Oklahoma that were not assigned to any native tribes

The Unassigned Lands in Oklahoma were in the center of the lands ceded to the United States by the Creek (Muskogee) and Seminole Indians following the Civil War and on which no other tribes had been settled. By 1883 it was bounded by the Cherokee Outlet on the north, several relocated Indian reservations on the east, the Chickasaw lands on the south, and the Cheyenne-Arapaho reserve on the west. The area amounted to 1,887,796.47 acres.

After the passage of the Organic Act in 1890, Cleveland County was organized as County 3 and Norman became the county seat. For a short time, Cleveland County was known as Little River County, until an election in 1890. The voters selected the name Cleveland in honor of President Grover Cleveland over the name Lincoln. [3]

Norman, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Norman is a city in the U.S. state of Oklahoma located 20 miles (32 km) south of downtown Oklahoma City. As the county seat of Cleveland County and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area, its population was 110,925 at the 2010 census. Norman's estimated population of 122,843 in 2017 makes it the third-largest city in Oklahoma.

Grover Cleveland 22nd and 24th president of the United States

Stephen Grover Cleveland was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office. He won the popular vote for three presidential elections—in 1884, 1888, and 1892—and was one of two Democrats to be elected president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 558 square miles (1,450 km2), of which 539 square miles (1,400 km2) is land and 19 square miles (49 km2) (3.5%) is water. [4] It is the seventh smallest county in the state.

Cleveland County contains the reservoir Lake Thunderbird 5,349 acres (21.65 km2), constructed between 1962 and 1965.

Cleveland County is the origin of the Little River, a tributary of the Canadian River, 90 miles (140 km) long. The Canadian River defines the southern border of Cleveland County.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 6,605
1900 16,388148.1%
1910 18,84315.0%
1920 19,3892.9%
1930 24,94828.7%
1940 27,72811.1%
1950 41,44349.5%
1960 47,60014.9%
1970 81,83971.9%
1980 133,17362.7%
1990 174,25330.8%
2000 208,01619.4%
2010 255,75522.9%
Est. 2018281,669 [5] 10.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2013 [1]
Age pyramid for Cleveland County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data. USA Cleveland County, Oklahoma age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid for Cleveland County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.

As of the census of 2010, [10] there were 255,755 people, 98,306 households, and 64,182 families residing in the county. The population density was 458 people per square mile (177/km²). There were 104,821 housing units at an average density of 188 per square mile (72.5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.3% white, 4.2% black or African American, 4.7% Native American, 3.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from other races, and 5.6% from two or more races. 7.0% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 98,306 households, of which almost half (49.9%) included married couples living together and more than a third (34.7%) were non-families. Almost a third (32.9%) included children under the age of 18, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present. More than a fourth (25.9%) of households consisted of a sole individual and 6.9% were individuals 65 years of age or older living alone. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.1% under the age of 18, 14.2% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.1 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $53,759, and the median income for a family was $67,412. Males had a median income of $45,580 versus $34,801 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,640. About 7.2% of families and 12.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.7% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2019 [11]
PartyNumber of votersPercentage
Democratic 53,23333.59%
Republican 76,06748.00%
Others29,18418.42%
Total158,484100%
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 57.1%62,53835.5% 38,8297.4% 8,083
2012 63.0%59,11637.0% 34,771
2008 62.0%64,74938.0% 39,681
2004 65.9%65,72034.1% 34,007
2000 62.2%47,39336.5% 27,7921.3% 986
1996 52.2%36,45737.3% 26,03810.4% 7,288
1992 44.1%35,56130.3% 24,40425.6% 20,664
1988 61.6%36,31337.4% 22,0670.9% 553
1984 71.7%42,80627.7% 16,5120.7% 387
1980 61.9%31,17828.8% 14,5369.3% 4,687
1976 51.1%22,09846.3% 20,0542.6% 1,129
1972 68.7%25,77729.7% 11,1261.6% 615
1968 48.3%12,44633.4% 8,61718.3% 4,711
1964 45.4% 9,65654.6%11,599
1960 59.2%9,29240.8% 6,397
1956 56.5%7,76643.5% 5,987
1952 56.8%8,14943.2% 6,190
1948 35.9% 3,67164.1%6,556
1944 40.9% 3,64258.9%5,2400.2% 21
1940 37.9% 3,66061.5%5,9330.6% 57
1936 29.3% 2,64369.9%6,3040.8% 75
1932 23.8% 1,86876.2%5,969
1928 61.4%3,73837.6% 2,2911.1% 64
1924 33.4% 1,67256.7%2,8419.9% 495
1920 45.8% 2,28348.1%2,3976.1% 305
1916 27.4% 88554.2%1,75318.5% 597
1912 32.7% 93851.3%1,47115.9% 456

Education

The University of Oklahoma is located in Norman. It is the largest university in Oklahoma with approximately 30,000 students.

Libraries

Pioneer Library System operates branch libraries in ten cities in Cleveland, McClain and Pottawatomie counties. [13]

Transportation

Airports

The University of Oklahoma Westheimer Airport is owned by the University of Oklahoma and located 3 nautical miles (5.6 km) northwest of Norman.

Major highways

Communities

NRHP sites

The following sites in Cleveland County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 8, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. 1 2 Wilson, Linda D. "Cleveland County," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, 2009. Accessed March 28, 2015.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved February 18, 2016.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  8. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  10. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). OK.gov. January 15, 2019. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  12. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-28.
  13. "Pioneer Library System to buy Borders bookstore building in Norman". NewsOK. The Oklahoman. September 27, 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-25.

Coordinates: 35°12′N97°20′W / 35.20°N 97.33°W / 35.20; -97.33