Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

Last updated
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma
Oklahoma City OK Oklahoma County Courthouse (Taken 20120926).jpg
Oklahoma County ok seal.jpg
Seal
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Oklahoma County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Oklahoma
Map of USA OK.svg
Oklahoma's location within the U.S.
Founded1890
Seat Oklahoma City
Largest cityOklahoma City
Area
  Total718 sq mi (1,860 km2)
  Land708.82 sq mi (1,836 km2)
  Water9.6 sq mi (25 km2), 1.3%
Population (est.)
  (2017)787,958
  Density1,111.6/sq mi (429.2/km2)
Congressional districts 4th, 5th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.oklahomacounty.org

Oklahoma County is a county located in the central part of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 718,633, [1] making it the most populous county in Oklahoma. The county seat is Oklahoma City, [2] the state capital and largest city.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

Central Oklahoma official tourism region of Oklahoma

Central Oklahoma is the geographical name for the central region of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It is also known by the Oklahoma Department of Tourism designation, Frontier Country, defined as the twelve-county region including Canadian, Grady, Logan, Oklahoma, Cleveland, McClain, Payne, Lincoln, Pottawatomie, Seminole, Okfuskee, and Hughes counties.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Contents

Oklahoma County is at the heart of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Oklahoma City metropolitan area Metropolitan area in Oklahoma, United States

The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area is an urban region in Central Oklahoma. It is the largest metropolitan area in the state of Oklahoma and contains the state capital and principal city, Oklahoma City. It is often known as the Oklahoma City Metro, Oklahoma City Metroplex, or Greater Oklahoma City in addition to the nicknames Oklahoma City is known for.

Oklahoma County is one of seven counties in the United States to share the same name as the state it is located in (the other six counties are Arkansas County, Hawaii County, Idaho County, Iowa County, New York County (known commonly as Manhattan), and Utah County), and the only one of the seven to contain the state capital. [3]

Arkansas County, Arkansas County in the United States

Arkansas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,019. Located in the Arkansas Delta, the county has two county seats, De Witt and Stuttgart.

Hawaii County, Hawaii County in the United States

Hawaiʻi County is a county in the U.S. state of Hawaii in the Hawaiian Islands. It is coterminous with the Island of Hawaiʻi, often called the "Big Island" to distinguish it from the state as a whole. As of the 2010 Census the population was 185,079. The county seat is Hilo. There are no incorporated cities in Hawaiʻi County. The Hilo Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Hawaiʻi County. Hawaiʻi County has a mayor-council form of government. Hawaii County is the largest county in the state in terms of geography.

Idaho County, Idaho County in the United States

Idaho County is a county in the U.S. state of Idaho, and the largest by area in the state. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,267. The county seat is Grangeville. Previous county seats of the area were Florence (1864–68), Washington (1868–75), and Mount Idaho (1875–1902).

History

Oklahoma County was originally called County Two and was one of seven counties established by the Organic Act of 1890. [4]

County business initially took place in a building at the intersection of California Avenue and Robinson Street until the construction of the first Oklahoma County Courthouse at 520 West Main Street in the 1900s. In 1937, the county government was moved to a building at 321 Park Avenue, which now serves only as the county courthouse. [5]

Oklahoma County Courthouse

Oklahoma County Courthouse in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma was designed by prominent Oklahoma architect Solomon Layton and partners George Forsyth and Jewel Hicks of the firm Layton & Forsyth, and was built in 1937. It replaced the original courthouse that was built with $100,000 in bonds issued and located at the intersection of California and Robinson at 520 West Main Street in the 1900s.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 718 square miles (1,860 km2), of which 709 square miles (1,840 km2) is land and 9.6 square miles (25 km2) (1.3%) is water. [6]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 11,742
1900 25,915120.7%
1910 85,232228.9%
1920 116,30736.5%
1930 221,73890.6%
1940 244,15910.1%
1950 325,35233.3%
1960 439,50635.1%
1970 526,80519.9%
1980 568,9338.0%
1990 599,6115.4%
2000 660,44810.1%
2010 718,6338.8%
Est. 2018792,582 [7] 10.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790-1960 [9] 1900-1990 [10]
1990-2000 [11] 2010-2013 [1]
Age pyramid for Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data. USA Oklahoma County, Oklahoma age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid for Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.

As of the Census of 2010, there were 718,633 people, 277,615 households, and 172,572 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,013 people per square mile (391/km²). There were 319,828 housing units at an average density of 416 per square mile (161/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 64.6% White, 15.4% Black or African American, 3.5% Native American, 3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 8.1% from other races, and 5.3% from two or more races. 15.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [12] 12.4% were of German, 12.3% Mexican, 10.1% Irish, 7.9% English, and 7.7% American ancestries according to the Census 2010. 84.4% spoke English and 11.5% Spanish as their first language. [13]

There were 277,615 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.8% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.60% under the age of 18, 10.90% from 18 to 24, 30.00% from 25 to 44, 21.40% from 45 to 64, and 12.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,916, and the median income for a family was $54,721. The per capita income for the county was $25,723. About 11.70% of families and 15.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.70% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over. [14]

Politics

Since the second half of the 20th century, Oklahoma County has been somewhat conservative for an urban county. It swung from a 20-point victory for Harry Truman in 1948 to a 15-point victory for Dwight Eisenhower in 1952. It has gone Republican in all but one presidential election since then; it narrowly voted for Lyndon Johnson in 1964. This mirrors the growing Republican trend in Oklahoma since the end of World War II.

However, the Republican share of votes for President has decreased in every election since the 2008 election. In the 2018 Oklahoma gubernatorial election, Oklahoma County gave Democratic candidate Drew Edmondson the largest vote share of any county, with 54.2% of the vote, whereas Republican Mary Fallin won the county with 51.3% of the vote four years prior. [15] Also, in the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma, Democrat Kendra Horn received 52.3% of the vote in Oklahoma County and was the only county in the state to vote for a Democratic candidate. [16]

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2019 [17]
PartyNumber of VotersPercentage
Democratic 153,95137.43%
Republican 181,16644.04%
Libertarian 2,2350.54%
Unaffiliated74,00417.99%
Total411,356100%
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [18]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 51.7%141,56941.2% 112,8137.1% 19,560
2012 58.3%149,72841.7% 106,982
2008 58.4%163,17241.6% 116,182
2004 64.2%174,74135.8% 97,298
2000 62.3%139,07836.6% 81,5901.1% 2,443
1996 54.7%120,42936.5% 80,4388.8% 19,386
1992 48.8%126,78829.3% 76,27121.9% 56,864
1988 63.6%135,37635.6% 75,8120.8% 1,703
1984 71.7%159,97427.0% 60,2351.4% 3,052
1980 66.1%139,53827.8% 58,7656.1% 12,970
1976 56.7%119,12041.5% 87,1851.8% 3,808
1972 75.2%156,43722.6% 46,9862.2% 4,502
1968 49.7%93,21232.2% 60,39518.1% 33,834
1964 48.0% 83,66052.0%90,641
1960 61.4%102,99238.6% 64,648
1956 59.8%85,39540.2% 57,512
1952 57.6%95,49242.4% 70,199
1948 40.1% 40,16159.9%59,954
1944 42.3% 42,46457.6%57,8120.1% 116
1940 39.8% 35,63959.9%53,6490.4% 329
1936 32.2% 24,31267.4%50,9460.5% 373
1932 34.1% 21,23866.0%41,130
1928 69.1%36,60830.4% 16,0730.5% 272
1924 40.6% 17,50450.4%21,7089.0% 3,873
1920 44.7% 15,35051.9%17,8203.5% 1,189
1916 36.3% 5,29154.7%7,9718.9% 1,302
1912 42.0% 5,70651.3%6,9636.7% 910

Communities

Cities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved November 12, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Joseph Nathan Kane; Charles Curry Aiken (2005). The American Counties: Origins of County Names, Dates of Creation, and Population Data, 1950-2000. Scarecrow Press. ISBN   978-0-8108-5036-1.
  4. Wilson, Linda D. "Oklahoma County," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Oklahoma Historical Society, 2009. Accessed April 4, 2015.
  5. "A Brief History of Oklahoma County Government." OklahomaCounty.org. Accessed 2009 September 17.
  6. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  7. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  8. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  9. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  10. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  12. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 5, 2014. Retrieved November 25, 2012.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  13. [ dead link ]
  14. "Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (OK) income map, earnings map, and wages data". www.city-data.com. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  15. https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2014/oklahoma-elections
  16. https://results.okelections.us/OKER/?elecDate=20181106
  17. "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). OK.gov (PDF). January 15, 2019. Retrieved 2019-01-27.
  18. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 29, 2018.

Coordinates: 35°29′N97°32′W / 35.48°N 97.53°W / 35.48; -97.53