Mayes County, Oklahoma

Last updated
Mayes County
Pensacola Dam USACE.jpg
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Mayes County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Oklahoma
Oklahoma in United States.svg
Oklahoma's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°18′N95°14′W / 36.3°N 95.24°W / 36.3; -95.24
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Oklahoma.svg  Oklahoma
FoundedNovember 16, 1907
Named for Samuel Houston Mayes
Seat Pryor Creek
Largest cityPryor Creek
Area
  Total684 sq mi (1,770 km2)
  Land655 sq mi (1,700 km2)
  Water28 sq mi (70 km2)  4.1%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total41,259
  Estimate 
(2019)
41,100
  Density63/sq mi (24/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 2nd
Website mayes.okcounties.org

Mayes County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,259. [1] Its county seat is Pryor Creek. [2] Named for Samuel Houston Mayes, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation from 1895 to 1899, it was originally created at the Sequoyah Convention in August 1905. [3]

Contents

History

According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, the area covered by what is now Mayes County has many prehistoric sites. There is evidence of human habitation dated before 6,000 B. C., plus 35 Archaic sites ( 6,000 B. C to 1 A. D.), 25 Woodland sites (1 A. D. to 1000 A. D.) and 31 Plains Village sites (1000 A. D. to 1500 A. D. [3]

French voyageurs roamed the area in the early 18th Century, giving French names to many of the waterways and other local sites. Jean Pierre Chouteau established a trading post at the location of the present town of Salina, where he chiefly traded with the Osage tribe that had settled in the vicinity. Union Mission, near the present day town of Chouteau, Oklahoma was established in 1820. Rev. Samuel Worcestor set up the first printing press in this part of the United States at Union Mission in 1835. [3]

In 1828, members of the Western Cherokee Nation began arriving in the area from their former lands in Arkansas. The Eastern Cherokee, who were forced from their homes in Tennessee, Georgia and North Carolina, followed during the 1830s. In 1841, the present Mayes County area became part of the Saline District of the Cherokee Nation. [3]

This area of Oklahoma experienced some military activity during the Civil War. A 300-man Union Army force surprised an equally large Confederate unit near the present site of Locust Grove, Oklahoma in July 1862. The Union force prevailed and captured about one third of the Confederates, while the remainder escaped. In July 1863, Confederate General Stand Watie tried to capture a Union supply train headed to Fort Gibson. Federal forces under Colonel James Williams successfully defended the train and drove off Watie's men. This action was thereafter known as the First Battle of Cabin Creek. In September 1864, General Watie and General Richard Gano did capture a Union supply train in the same location. This was named the Second Battle of Cabin Creek. Colonel James Williams led a detachment that recovered the wagon train in a skirmish near Pryor Creek. The Confederate force escaped. [3]

After the Civil War, transportation improvements opened up the area's economy. The East Shawnee Trail, and early cattle trail followed the route of the Grand River. The Texas Road came through later. In 1871 to 1872, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad built its track through the present county. The Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway (later, the Kansas, Oklahoma and Gulf Railway) built a line in 1913 that joined the Katy system at Strang, Oklahoma. [3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 684 square miles (1,770 km2), of which 655 square miles (1,700 km2) is land and 28 square miles (73 km2) (4.1%) is water. [4]

The county is bisected by the Grand River. The eastern half of the county is on the Ozark Plateau, with flat areas divided by deep stream valleys. The western half is in the Prairie Plains. [3]

The county contains several man-made major reservoirs, including:

Lake Spavinaw is owned by the city of Tulsa and is the principal source of water for the city. The other three reservoirs were built by the Federal Government primarily for flood control and hydroelectric power generation. They are managed by the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA). GRDA also manages the GRDA Coal-fired power generation station. [3]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 13,596
1920 16,82923.8%
1930 17,8836.3%
1940 21,66821.2%
1950 19,743−8.9%
1960 20,0731.7%
1970 23,30216.1%
1980 32,26138.4%
1990 33,3663.4%
2000 38,36915.0%
2010 41,2597.5%
2018 (est.)41,100 [5] −0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2019 [1]

As of 2010 Mayes County had a population of 41,259. The racial and ethnic makeup of the population was 68.0% white, 0.4% black, 21.4% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.8% reporting some other race and 9.0% of the population reporting two or more races. 2.7% of the population reported being Hispanic or Latino of any race. [10]

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 38,369 people, 14,823 households, and 10,820 families residing in the county. The population density was 58 people per square mile (23/km2). There were 17,423 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 72.14% White, 0.30% Black or African American, 19.10% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 7.55% from two or more races. 1.87% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 94.8% spoke English, 2.1% Cherokee, 1.4% Spanish and 1.2% German as their first language.

There were 14,823 households, out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.20% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.00% were non-families. 23.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.60% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 26.20% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 98.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,125, and the median income for a family was $37,542. Males had a median income of $31,668 versus $20,573 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,350. About 11.20% of families and 14.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.90% of those under age 18 and 10.90% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2019 [12]
PartyNumber of VotersPercentage
Democratic 9,02140.72%
Republican 10,22246.14%
Others2,91113.14%
Total22,154100%
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [13]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 73.5%11,55521.8% 3,4234.7% 739
2012 66.7%9,63733.4% 4,823
2008 64.0%10,23436.0% 5,749
2004 58.9%9,94641.1% 6,933
2000 50.9%7,13247.3% 6,6181.8% 251
1996 39.6% 5,26847.9%6,37712.5% 1,663
1992 35.9% 5,44542.4%6,43221.7% 3,294
1988 47.4% 6,11551.9%6,6910.7% 95
1984 62.0%8,58537.3% 5,1540.7% 99
1980 53.7%6,63343.2% 5,3443.1% 381
1976 44.1% 5,04055.2%6,2980.7% 81
1972 72.1%7,53525.4% 2,6562.5% 263
1968 44.6%4,26029.9% 2,85525.5% 2,431
1964 43.4% 4,15756.6%5,421
1960 58.3%5,19441.7% 3,721
1956 55.4%4,67744.6% 3,760
1952 55.1%4,70444.9% 3,837
1948 40.5% 2,85459.6%4,201
1944 49.8% 3,82249.9%3,8300.3% 19
1940 47.1% 3,63152.6%4,0570.3% 21
1936 40.6% 2,69059.2%3,9200.2% 13
1932 26.4% 1,59673.6%4,444
1928 57.6%3,00441.5% 2,1610.9% 49
1924 47.4%2,31746.0% 2,2466.7% 325
1920 53.2%2,44743.2% 1,9873.6% 163
1916 40.6% 1,22951.9%1,5747.5% 228
1912 40.2% 1,07751.9%1,3918.0% 214

Economy

Agriculture has long been the primary economic activity in the county. Important crops include: corn, soybeans, sorghum and hay. Cattle raising and dairy farming occur in the more rugged parts of the Ozark Plateau. [3]

Heavy industry came to the county in 1941 with the creation of the government-owned Oklahoma Ordnance Works, a munitions manufacturing plant near Pryor. The plant, which had been operated by duPont, closed after the end of World War II, and remained vacant for many years. In 1960, the former munitions plant was converted into the MidAmerica Industrial Park, which included plants manufacturing paper, cement and fertilizer. [3]

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is a major employer. It operates several hydroelectric plants and two coal-fired electric power generators in the county. [3]

There is a Google data center in the county. [14]

Communities

City

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated community

NRHP sites

The following sites in Mayes County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

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Chouteau, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Chouteau is the second-largest town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,097 at the 2010 census, an increase of 8.6 percent over the figure of 1,931 recorded in 2000.

Disney, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Disney is a town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 311 at the 2010 census. Despite its name, it is in no affiliation with The Walt Disney Company or Walt Disney himself.

Langley, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Langley is a town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 819 at the 2010 census.

Pensacola, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Pensacola is a town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 125 at the 2010 census, which represented a 76 percent increase from the figure of 71 recorded in 2000.

Pryor Creek, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Pryor Creek or Pryor is a city in and county seat of Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 8,659 at the 2000 census, compared to 9,539 in the 2010 census.

Salina, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Salina is a town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,396 at the 2010 census, a slight decline from the figure of 1,422 recorded in 2000.

Spavinaw, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Spavinaw is a town in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 437 at the 2010 census, a decline of 22.4 percent from the figure of 563 recorded in 2000. The town is best known as the birthplace of baseball player Mickey Mantle. It is also notable for the nearby Lake Spavinaw, the principal source of water for Tulsa.

Webbers Falls, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Webbers Falls is a town in southeastern Muskogee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 616 at the 2010 census, a decline of 14.9 percent from the figure of 724 recorded in 2000.

Two American Civil War military engagements were fought at the Cabin Creek Battlefield in the Cherokee Nation within Indian Territory. The location was where the Texas Road crossed Cabin Creek, near the present-day town of Big Cabin, Oklahoma. Both the First and Second Battles of Cabin Creek were launched by the Confederate Army to disrupt Union Army supply trains.

The Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) is a non-profit Oklahoma agency created to control, develop, and maintain the Grand River waterway. It was created by the Oklahoma state legislature in 1935, and is headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma. GRDA was designed to be self-funding from the sales of electricity and water. The state of Oklahoma was to provide no funding from taxes. The Authority was authorized to issue revenue bonds to fund large-scale capital investments.

Lake Hudson (Oklahoma) Dam in Mayes County, Oklahoma

Lake Hudson, also known as Markham Ferry Reservoir, is a man-made reservoir in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States, about 2 miles (3.2 km) northwest of Locust Grove, Oklahoma and 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Pryor, Oklahoma. It was created by the completion of the Robert S. Kerr Dam on the Grand River in 1964. It is managed by the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA).

Lake W. R. Holway, or Chimney Rock Lake is a reservoir in Mayes County, Oklahoma on the Saline Creek arm of Lake Hudson (Oklahoma). It was created in 1968 by the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA) as an integral part of the Salina Pumped Storage Project. It is northeast of Locust Grove and southeast of Salina, Oklahoma. Originally named Chimney Rock Lake, it was renamed in 1981 to honor W. R. Holway, the consulting engineer who was responsible for constructing the Spavinaw Water Project, Pensacola Dam, and other important projects. Its primary purpose is peak power generation.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved November 9, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Amanda Carney, "Mayes County." Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Retrieved September 14, 2011.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  5. "County Population Totals: 2010-2019" . Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  8. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  10. 2010 general profile of population and housing characteristics of Mayes County from the US Census
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). OK.gov. January 15, 2019. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  13. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  14. "Mayes County, Oklahoma – Data Centers – Google". www.google.com. Retrieved March 29, 2018.

Coordinates: 36°18′N95°14′W / 36.30°N 95.24°W / 36.30; -95.24