Hollis, Oklahoma

Last updated
Hollis, Oklahoma
Harmon County Courthouse.jpg
Harmon County Courthouse
OKMap-doton-Hollis.PNG
Location of Hollis, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 34°41′11″N99°55′1″W / 34.68639°N 99.91694°W / 34.68639; -99.91694 Coordinates: 34°41′11″N99°55′1″W / 34.68639°N 99.91694°W / 34.68639; -99.91694
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Harmon
Government
  TypeCouncil-manager
Area
[1]
  Total1.44 sq mi (3.73 km2)
  Land1.44 sq mi (3.73 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
1,627 ft (496 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total2,060
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
1,873
  Density1,298.89/sq mi (501.61/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
73550
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-35500 [3]
GNIS ID 1093847 [4]

Hollis is a city in and the county seat of Harmon County, Oklahoma, United States. [5] The population was 2,060 at the 2010 census.

Contents

History

The city was named for George W. Hollis, a local businessman and member of the townsite committee that laid out the town in 1898, while the site was still in old Greer County, Texas. [6] The original plat was lost, and after a lawsuit, the town was re-platted in 1903. The original business district comprised a general store opened by George Hollis and a blacksmith shop owned by James (Jim) Maylen Prock. A post office named for Hollis was established October 31, 1901. [6]

Hollis was in Greer County, Oklahoma until 1909, when Governor Haskell divided the old county into Greer County and Harmon County, Hollis fell into Harmon County. An election was held to choose a county seat. Contenders were Hollis, Dryden, Looney and Vinson. Hollis won the election. [6]

Geography

Hollis is located at 34°41′11″N99°55′1″W / 34.68639°N 99.91694°W / 34.68639; -99.91694 (34.686374, -99.916889). [7] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2), all land.

Climate

Hollis experiences a dry humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) with cool, dry winters and hot, much wetter summers.

Climate data for Hollis, Oklahoma
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)86
(30)
92
(33)
102
(39)
103
(39)
110
(43)
117
(47)
116
(47)
117
(47)
110
(43)
106
(41)
94
(34)
89
(32)
117
(47)
Average high °F (°C)51.4
(10.8)
57.7
(14.3)
67.1
(19.5)
75.9
(24.4)
83.6
(28.7)
92.2
(33.4)
96.9
(36.1)
95.3
(35.2)
87.1
(30.6)
76.4
(24.7)
62.2
(16.8)
52.5
(11.4)
74.9
(23.8)
Daily mean °F (°C)38.1
(3.4)
43.7
(6.5)
52.3
(11.3)
61.0
(16.1)
70.2
(21.2)
78.8
(26.0)
83.4
(28.6)
81.8
(27.7)
74.0
(23.3)
62.4
(16.9)
49.2
(9.6)
39.8
(4.3)
61.2
(16.2)
Average low °F (°C)24.8
(−4.0)
29.6
(−1.3)
37.5
(3.1)
46.1
(7.8)
56.7
(13.7)
65.4
(18.6)
69.9
(21.1)
68.2
(20.1)
60.8
(16.0)
48.4
(9.1)
36.1
(2.3)
27.1
(−2.7)
47.6
(8.6)
Record low °F (°C)−12
(−24)
−10
(−23)
2
(−17)
20
(−7)
32
(0)
44
(7)
48
(9)
50
(10)
31
(−1)
17
(−8)
10
(−12)
−9
(−23)
−12
(−24)
Average precipitation inches (mm)0.63
(16)
1.15
(29)
1.55
(39)
2.61
(66)
4.01
(102)
4.22
(107)
1.77
(45)
2.53
(64)
3.11
(79)
2.41
(61)
1.23
(31)
0.96
(24)
26.18
(663)
Source 1: NOAA (normals, 1971–2000) [8]
Source 2: The Weather Channel (Records) [9]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 964
1920 1,68374.6%
1930 2,91473.1%
1940 2,732−6.2%
1950 3,08913.1%
1960 3,0890.0%
1970 3,1502.0%
1980 2,958−6.1%
1990 2,643−10.6%
2000 2,264−14.3%
2010 2,060−9.0%
2019 (est.)1,873 [2] −9.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]

As of the census [3] of 2000, there were 2,264 people, 845 households, and 561 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,589.8 people per square mile (615.6/km2). There were 1,081 housing units at an average density of 759.1/sq mi (293.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.65% White, 12.68% African American, 0.84% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 17.67% from other races, and 1.94% from two or more races. 28.18% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 845 households, out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.6% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 27.3% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 24.1% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $19,421, and the median income for a family was $23,103. Males had a median income of $20,791 versus $14,792 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,408. About 29.4% of families and 36.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 47.6% of those under age 18 and 26.2% of those age 65 or over.

Additional information

Hollis is a close-knit community which only has one stoplight at the corner of Highway 62 and Highway 30, the only two main highways that pass through the town. It features the Hollis Municipal Airport located north of the town on Highway 30 and the Hollis Livestock Commission, which is a major source of economy for the town.

Education

The Hollis Public School System comprises the only school located in Harmon County, and its Sallie Gillentine Elementary School is Harmon County's sole elementary school. [11]

Notable people

left to right: Glenn, Don, Ray, Darrell Royal - Hollis, OK Dkrbrothers.jpg
left to right: Glenn, Don, Ray, Darrell Royal - Hollis, OK

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  6. 1 2 3 Hudson, Sylvia and Zen Stinchcomb. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Hollis." Retrieved July 17, 2013
  7. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. "Climatography of the United States NO.81" (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 13, 2014. Retrieved January 16, 2011.
  9. "Monthly Averages for Hollis, OK". The Weather Channel . Retrieved January 16, 2011.
  10. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  11. Estes, Amy. "Sallie Gillentine Elementary School". Hollis Independent School District 66. Retrieved 2011-11-24.