Mission Bay (San Francisco)

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Mission Bay [1] was a bay and the estuary of Mission Creek, on the west shore of San Francisco Bay, between Steamboat Point and Point San Quentin or Potrero Point. It is now mostly filled in and is the location of the Mission Bay neighborhood of San Francisco.

Contents

The Shoreline of San Francisco in 1853. 1853 U.S.C.S. Map of San Francisco, California ^ Vicinity - Geographicus - SanFrancisco3-uscs-1853.jpg
The Shoreline of San Francisco in 1853.

History

Mission Bay was a lagoon nestled inside of a +500 acre salt marsh and was occupied by year-round tidal waters. [2] This area was a natural habitat and refuge for large water fowl populations that included ducks, geese, herons, egrets, ospreys and gulls. The Native American tribes who lived in this area were the Costanoan people who spoke eight different languages which delineated between the various tribelets. The tribe most prevalent in the Bay area was the Patwin people who lived in the area for over 5,000 years.[ citation needed ] By the early 19th century, European immigrants exposed the population to various deadly diseases that reduced the Patwin population dramatically.

From the 1850s the area was used for shipbuilding and repair, butchery and meat production, and oyster and clam fishing. [3] Beginning in the mid-1800s, in attempts to make this area suitable for building, Mission Bay like most of the shoreline of the city of San Francisco, was used as a convenient place to deposit refuse from building projects and debris from the 1906 earthquake. As the marsh stabilized with the weight of the infill, the area quickly became an industrial district. With the addition of the railroad, Mission Bay became the home to shipyards, canneries, a sugar refinery and various warehouses. [4]

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References

  1. https://www.sfcityguides.org/public_guidelines.html?article=316&submitted=TRUE&srch_text=&submitted2=true&topic= Southeastern view of San Francisco taken from Jones and California Streets in 1867 shows Mission Bay and Long Bridge. historic photo, S.F. History Center, S.F. Public Library.
  2. Nancy Olmsted, Mission Bay Gazeteer of Historic Places, foldout at the end of "Vanished Waters: A History of San Francisco's Mission Bay" published by the Mission Creek Conservancy, and republished by foundsf.org with their permission. From foundsf.org accessed 3/29/2015.
  3. History of Mission Bay from acc-missionbayconferencecenter.com accessed 3/29/2015.
  4. History of Mission Bay Archived 2015-02-15 at the Wayback Machine from missionbayparks.com accessed 3/29/2015.

Coordinates: 37°46′13″N122°23′27″W / 37.77018°N 122.39091°W / 37.77018; -122.39091