San Francisco Bay Discovery Site

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San Francisco Bay Discovery Site
San Francisco Bay Discovery Site vista (2009).jpg
Historical marker at Sweeney Ridge
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SF Bay Discovery Site
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SF Bay Discovery Site
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SF Bay Discovery Site
Location Golden Gate National Recreation Area
Coordinates 37°36′16″N122°27′28″W / 37.60444°N 122.45778°W / 37.60444; -122.45778 Coordinates: 37°36′16″N122°27′28″W / 37.60444°N 122.45778°W / 37.60444; -122.45778
Area18.2 acres (7.4 ha)
Built1769 (1769)
NRHP reference No. 68000022 [2]
CHISL No.394 [1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPMay 23, 1968
Designated NHLMay 23, 1968 [3]

The San Francisco Bay Discovery Site is a marker commemorating the first recorded European sighting of San Francisco Bay. In 1769, the Portola expedition traveled north by land from San Diego, seeking to establish a base at the Port of Monterey described by Sebastian Vizcaino in 1602. When they reached Monterey, however, they were not sure it was the right place and decided to continue north. The party reached San Pedro Creek on October 31 and camped there for four nights, while scouts led by José Francisco Ortega climbed Sweeney Ridge, where they could see over the ridge toward the east, and so became the first Europeans to see San Francisco Bay on November 1.

Contents

The scouts returned on November 3, and led the entire party up to the ridge on November 4. Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi noted in his diary, "from the summit of a peak we beheld the great estuary or arm of the sea." [4] After seeing the immense bay to the east, and having learned from the scouts that further progress to the north would be blocked by the Golden Gate, the party turned southeast and descended toward the bay.

Sweeney Ridge is located in northern San Mateo County and is now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. [5] [6] The site is both a California Historical Landmark and a National Historic Landmark. [3] [1] The spot chosen for the marker is somewhat arbitrary, as the precise location where Portola's party reached the summit of the ridge is not known. The landmarked area encompasses two of the highest knolls on the ridge. [5]

As of October, 2020, the marker has been vandalized, with Portolà’s name and the date of the discovery chiseled away.

See also

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Portolá Trail Campsites California Historic Landmark


The Portolá Trail Campsite or Portolá Trail Campsite No. 1 is the spot of the first Europeans to travel and camp overnight in what is now Central Los Angeles, California. The Portolá expedition camped at the site on August 2, 1769. The Portolá Trail Campsite No. 1 was designated a California Historic Landmark (No.655) on Sept. 26, 1958. The Portolá Trail Campsite is located in what is now the Elysian Park entrance, at the NW corner of North Broadway and Elysian Park Drive in the City of Los Angeles in Los Angeles County. The campsite is near the Los Angeles River, which they used as their water supply for the camp. Military officer Gaspar de Portolá was the commander of the expedition for the Spanish Empire with the goal of the Spanish colonization of the Americas. The expedition led to the founding of the first mission in the Los Angeles Basin, the Mission Vieja, on September 8, 1771 and of Alta California. The expedition arrived at Portolá Trail Campsite No. 1 from the San Gabriel Valley, were the Mission San Gabriel would be built later in 1776. As they depart Portolá Trail Campsite No. 1 they traveled west towards Santa Monica Bay, stopping at Portolá Trail Campsite 2, which is in present day Beverly Hills. Portolá Trail Campsite 2 is also a California Historic Landmark (No.665). At San Monica Bay the expedition turned and traveled north to were the future Mission San Fernando would be built in 1797. Form San Fernando the expedition turned west to Ventura, the site of the future Mission San Buenaventura built in 1782.

Portolá Trail Campsite 2 California Historic Landmark

The Portolá Trail Campsite 2 or Portolá Trail Campsite No. 2 is the spot of the first Europeans to travel and camp overnight in what is now Beverly Hills, California. The Portolá expedition camped at the site on August 3, 1769. The Portolá Trail Campsite No. 2 was designated a California Historic Landmark (No.665) on Nov. 5, 1958. The Portolá Trail Campsite is located in what is now 325 South La Cienega Boulevard between Olympic Boulevard and Gregory, in Beverly Hills. in Los Angeles County. Military officer Gaspar de Portolá was the commander of the expedition for the Spanish Empire with the goal of the Spanish colonization of the Americas. The expedition led to the founding of the first mission in the Los Angeles Basin, the Mission Vieja, on September 8, 1771 and of Alta California. The expedition arrived at Portolá Trail Campsite No. 2 from the Portolá Trail Campsite No. 1 in what is now Elysian Park. They came to camp site 1 from the San Gabriel Valley, were the Mission San Gabriel would be built later in 1776. As they depart Portolá Trail Campsite No. 2 they traveled west towards Santa Monica Bay. At San Monica Bay the expedition turned and traveled north to were the future Mission San Fernando would be built in 1797. Form San Fernando the expedition turned west to Ventura, the site of the future Mission San Buenaventura built in 1782.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "San Francisco Bay Discovery Site". Office of Historic Preservation, California State Parks. Retrieved 2012-10-14.
  2. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  3. 1 2 NHL Summary
  4. Bolton, Herbert E. (1927). Fray Juan Crespi: Missionary Explorer on the Pacific Coast, 1769-1774. HathiTrust Digital Library. p. 231. Retrieved March 26, 2017.
  5. 1 2 McKithan, Cecil (June 1978). "San Francisco Bay Discovery Site" (pdf). National Survey of Historic Sites and Buildings. National Park Service . Retrieved 25 May 2012.
  6. "San Francisco Bay Discovery Site" (pdf). Photographs. National Park Service . Retrieved 25 May 2012.