Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline

Last updated
Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline
Type Regional Shoreline
Location Alameda County, California
Nearest city San Leandro, California
Area 157 acres (0.64 km2)
Created 1980
Operated by East Bay Regional Park District

Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline is a park in San Leandro, California, part of the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD). [1] It is located along the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay directly to the south of Oakland International Airport. [2] The property was originally used as a landfill for 37 years, until it was filled to capacity in 1977, when it was capped with a clay cover. EBRPD bought the property in 1980, intending to use it as a park. [3]

San Leandro, California City in California, United States

San Leandro is a large suburban town in Alameda County, California, United States. It is located on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay, between Oakland to the northwest and Hayward to the southeast.

East Bay Regional Park District

The East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) is a special district operating in Alameda County and Contra Costa County, California, within the East Bay area of the San Francisco Bay Area. It maintains and operates a system of regional parks which is the largest urban regional park district in the United States. The administrative office is located in Oakland.

San Francisco Bay bay on the California coast of the United States

San Francisco Bay is a shallow estuary in the US state of California. It is surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area, and is dominated by the large cities of San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland.

Contents

History

The property now known as Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline was originally used as a landfill, but that operation closed during in 1977. EBRPD bought the site in the early 1980s, intending to someday develop it into a park. [1] [lower-alpha 1] Since then, the park district has imported clean soil to ensure that the former landfill would meet the requirements for adequate cap and surface drainage to minimize infiltration. Having done this, EBRPD has allowed passive recreational activities (such as "...dog walking, hiking, and picnicking while converting the site into parkland for the future development of active recreation areas such as disc golf and bicycle skills, and to provide parking within the park"). [1]

Disc golf type of sport

Disc golf is a flying disc sport in which players throw a disc at a target; it is played using rules similar to golf. It is often played on a course of 9 or 18 holes. Players complete a hole by throwing a disc from a tee area toward a target, throwing again from the landing position of the disc until the target is reached. Usually, the number of throws a player uses to reach each target are tallied, and players seek to complete each hole, and the course, in the lowest number of total throws.

EBRPD's directors approved the Land Use Plan Amendment (LUPA) adopted the Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) for Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline on December 17, 2013. LUPA guides, "... the future development of Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline including a new primary access and parking, formalization of the trail system, resource management, a bicycle skills area, a disc golf course, and a dedicated off-leash dog area. The MND analyzed the potentially significant environmental impacts that could result from implementation of the LUPA and adopted mitigation measures to ensure that environmental impacts remain at a less than significant level. [1]

General description

The main entrance to the park was at the end of Neptune Boulevard, off of Marina Boulevard. As of 2014, EBRPD had begun construction of a second park entrance on Davis Street. [3]

There are seven non-reservable picnic areas along the multipurpose interior trails. The interior trails lead to a viewing site near the middle of the park that is marked by a sculpture named "Rising Wave. [lower-alpha 2] The 2 miles (3.2 km) long San Francisco Bay Trail is paved from the Neptune Drive entrance to the Bill Lockyer bridge. [1] According to Todd's article, dogs using paved trails (which applies to a segment of the Bay Area Trail and a nature walk), but unleashed dogs are allowed to use only unimproved and unpaved trails. [3]

Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline Loop is a 4.6 miles (7.4 km) long trail in the park that can be used by dogs. It is rated good for all skill levels, and even has a water fountain along the route that also is accessible by dogs. [4]


Notes

  1. Writer Gail Todd states that the Oyster Bay landfill reached its capacity in 1977, and was then sealed with a clay cap. She adds that EBRPD bought and dedicated the site as a park in 1980. [3]
  2. "Rising Wave" was created by sculptor, Roger Berry. [1]

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See also


Coordinates: 37°42′35″N122°11′34″W / 37.709821°N 122.19274°W / 37.709821; -122.19274