Oklahoma's 4th congressional district

Last updated
Oklahoma's 4th congressional district
Oklahoma US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
Oklahoma's 4th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Tom Cole
RMoore
Distribution
  • 63.29% urban
  • 36.71% rural
Population (2010)785,424
Median income$54,885 [1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVI R+20 [2]

Oklahoma's 4th congressional district is located in south-central Oklahoma and covers (in whole or in part) a total of 15 counties. Its principal cities include Midwest City, Norman, Moore, Ada, Duncan, Lawton/Ft. Sill, and Ardmore. The district also includes much of southern Oklahoma City.

Contents

The district is currently represented by Republican Tom Cole.

As with the rest of the state, the district gives GOP candidates wide margins - George W. Bush received 61 percent of the vote in 2000, 67% in 2004 and John McCain received 66% of the vote in 2008.

Geography

The district borders Texas along the Red River to the south. To the north, the district includes a very small square-shaped portion of south-central Oklahoma County (enough to capture the city of Midwest City) and then Cleveland, McClain, Grady, Garvin, Pontotoc, Comanche, Tillman, Cotton, Stephens, Jefferson, Carter, and Love counties.

Demographics

The district is 63 percent urban, 5 percent Latino, and 3.5 percent foreign-born. [3]

Recent results from statewide elections

YearOfficeResults
2000 President Bush 61% - 39%
2004 President Bush 67% - 33%
2008 President McCain 66% - 34%
2016 President Trump 66% - 28%

List of members representing the district

NamePartyYearsCong
ess
Electoral history
District createdNovember 16, 1907
Charles D. Carter.jpeg
Charles D. Carter
DemocraticNovember 16, 1907 –
March 3, 1915
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
Elected in 1907.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Redistricted to the 3rd district .
Murray 3820618984 5cb0d9555b o.jpg
William H. Murray
DemocraticMarch 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1917
64th Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1914.
Lost renomination.
TomDMcKeown.jpg
Tom D. McKeown
DemocraticMarch 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1921
65th
66th
Elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Lost re-election.
JCPringey.jpg
Joseph C. Pringey
RepublicanMarch 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
TomDMcKeown.jpg
Tom D. McKeown
DemocraticMarch 4, 1923 –
January 3, 1935
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
Again elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Lost renomination.
Percy Gassaway image.jpg
Percy Lee Gassaway
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1937
74th Elected in 1934.
Lost renomination.
LyleHBoren.jpg
Lyle Boren
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1947
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
Elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Lost renomination.
Glen Johnson portrait.jpg
Glen D. Johnson
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th Elected in 1946.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Tom Steed.jpg
Tom Steed
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1981
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Retired.
Dave McCurdy.jpg
Dave McCurdy
DemocraticJanuary 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1995
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Watts.JPG
J. C. Watts
RepublicanJanuary 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2003
104th
105th
106th
107th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Retired.
Tom Cole official congressional photo.jpg
Tom Cole
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2003 –
present
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.

Recent electoral history

Oklahoma's 4th congressional district : Results 1994 – 2014 [4]
YearDemocraticVotesPctRepublicanVotesPct3rd PartyPartyVotesPct4th PartyPartyVotesPct
1994 David Perryman67,23743%√ J. C. Watts, Jr.80,25152%Bill Tiffee Independent 7,9135%
1996 Ed Crocker 73,95040%√ J. C. Watts, Jr.106,92358%Robert Murphy Libertarian 4,5002%
1998 Ben Odom52,10738%√ J. C. Watts, Jr.83,27262%
2000 Larry Weatherford54,80831%√ J. C. Watts, Jr.114,00065%Susan Ducey Reform 4,8973%Keith B. Johnson Libertarian 1,9791%
2002 Darryl Roberts91,32246.17%√ Tom Cole106,45253.83%
2004 (no candidate)√ Tom Cole198,98577.77%Charlene K. Bradshaw Independent 56,86922.23%
2006 Hal Spake64,77535.39%√ Tom Cole118,26664.61%
2008 Blake Cummings79,67429.21%√ Tom Cole180,08066.02%David E. Joyce Independent 13,0274.78%
2010*(no candidate)√ Tom Cole32,58977.26% RJ Harris Republican 9,59322.74%
2012 Donna Marie Bebo 71,15527.60%√ Tom Cole176,56167.89% RJ Harris Independent 11,7254.51%
2014 Bert Smith40,99824.66%√ Tom Cole117,72170.80%Dennis B. Johnson Independent 7,5494.54%

Living former members

As of January 2019, there are two living former members. The most recent representative to die was Lyle Boren (served 1937–1947) on July 2, 1992. The most recently serving representative to die was Tom Steed (served 1949–1981) on June 8, 1983.

RepresentativeTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
Dave McCurdy 1981–1995March 30, 1950 (age 69)
J. C. Watts 1995–2003November 18, 1957 (age 62)

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013 OK district 4.gif
2003 - 2013

See also

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References

  1. https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=40&cd=04
  2. "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. District Demographics, That's My Congress (accessed June 1, 2010).
  4. "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Archived from the original on July 25, 2007. Retrieved March 19, 2009.

Coordinates: 35°N98°W / 35°N 98°W / 35; -98