Thayer County, Nebraska

Last updated
Thayer County, Nebraska
Thayer County, Nebraska courthouse from E 1.JPG
Thayer County Courthouse in Hebron
Map of Nebraska highlighting Thayer County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Nebraska
Map of USA NE.svg
Nebraska's location within the U.S.
Founded1856 (founded - as "Jefferson County")
1871 (organized - as "Thayer County")
Named for John Milton Thayer
Seat Hebron
Largest cityHebron
Area
  Total575 sq mi (1,489 km2)
  Land574 sq mi (1,487 km2)
  Water1.2 sq mi (3 km2), 0.2%
Population (est.)
  (2017)5,045
  Density8.8/sq mi (3.4/km2)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website thayercountyne.gov

Thayer County is a county in the U.S. state of Nebraska. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 5,228. [1] Its county seat is Hebron. [2] The county was created in 1856 and originally named Jefferson County. It was organized in 1870-1871 and renamed for General and Governor John Milton Thayer. [3] [4] [5] [6]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity sharing sovereignty as the United States of America

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Nebraska State of the United States of America

Nebraska is a state that lies in both the Great Plains and the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by South Dakota to the north; Iowa to the east and Missouri to the southeast, both across the Missouri River; Kansas to the south; Colorado to the southwest; and Wyoming to the west. It is the only triply landlocked U.S. state.

Contents

In the Nebraska license plate system, Thayer County is represented by the prefix 32 (it had the thirty-second-largest number of vehicles registered in the state when the license plate system was established in 1922).

The U.S. state of Nebraska first required its residents to register their motor vehicles in 1905. Registrants provided their own license plates for display until 1915, when the state began to issue plates.

Geography

Thayer County lies on the south line of Nebraska. Its south boundary line abuts the north boundary line of the state of Kansas. Its terrain consists of rolling hills, sloped toward the east. A local drainage, Big Sandy Creek, flows southeast and east through the northern part of the county, and another drainage, Rose Creek, flows northeastward through the SE corner of the county (they converge east of Thayer County's east boundary line). The planar portions of the terrain are partially used for agriculture. [7]

Kansas State of the United States of America

Kansas is a U.S. state in the Midwestern United States. Its capital is Topeka and its largest city is Wichita, with its most populated county being Johnson County. Kansas is named after the Kansa Native American tribe, which inhabited the area. The tribe's name is often said to mean "people of the (south) wind" although this was probably not the term's original meaning. For thousands of years, what is now Kansas was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys. Tribes in the western part of the state were semi-nomadic and hunted large herds of bison.

Thayer County has an area of 575 square miles (1,490 km2), of which 574 square miles (1,490 km2) is land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) (0.2%) is water. [8]

Major highways

U.S. Route 136 in Nebraska highway in Nebraska

U.S. Highway 136 is a part of the United States Numbered Highway System that runs for 804 miles (1,294 km) between Edison, Nebraska and Speedway, Indiana. It is a spur route of US 36 despite never intersecting its parent. Within the State of Nebraska it is a state highway that begins at a junction with US 6 and US 34 north of Edison and travels east across the southern part of the state to the Nebraska–Missouri state line in Brownville along the banks of the Missouri River. Throughout its 239.88-mile (386.05 km) length, the highway is known as the Heritage Highway, one of nine scenic byways in the state. The highway travels across the grassland prairies of southern Nebraska to the woods of the Missouri River Valley encountering winding rivers, farmlands, and historic settlements. These landscapes were featured in stories from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Willa Cather recounting life on the Nebraska Plains during the end of the 19th century. For its entire length, US 136 is a two-lane highway with the exception of a 0.51-mile (0.82 km) stretch of divided highway within Fairbury.

Nebraska Highway 4 highway in Nebraska

Nebraska Highway 4 is a highway in Nebraska. The entirety of the route is in Nebraska's southern tier of counties. Beatrice is the only city with over 1,000 in population on the highway. Its western terminus is at an intersection with US 6 and US 34 southwest of Atlanta. Its eastern terminus is at an intersection with US 75 north of Dawson.

Nebraska Highway 5 highway in Nebraska

Nebraska Highway 5 is a highway in southern Nebraska. It has a southern terminus at an intersection with U.S. Highway 136 in Deshler and a northern terminus at an intersection with Nebraska Highway 4 between Davenport and Carleton. It is a north–south highway which lies entirely in Thayer County.

Adjacent counties

Saline County, Nebraska county in Nebraska

Saline County is a county in the U.S. state of Nebraska. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 14,200. Its county seat is Wilber.

Jefferson County, Nebraska county Nebraska, United States

Jefferson County is a county in the U.S. state of Nebraska. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 7,547. Its county seat is Fairbury. The county was named for Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States of America.

Washington County, Kansas county in Kansas

Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 5,799. Its county seat and largest city is Washington.

Protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 6,113
1890 12,738108.4%
1900 14,32512.5%
1910 14,7753.1%
1920 13,976−5.4%
1930 13,684−2.1%
1940 12,262−10.4%
1950 10,563−13.9%
1960 9,118−13.7%
1970 7,779−14.7%
1980 7,582−2.5%
1990 6,635−12.5%
2000 6,055−8.7%
2010 5,228−13.7%
Est. 20175,045 [11] −3.5%
US Decennial Census [12]
1790-1960 [13] 1900-1990 [14]
1990-2000 [15] 2010-2013 [1]

As of the 2000 United States Census, [16] there were 6,055 people, 2,541 households, and 1,689 families in the county. The population density was 10 people per square mile (4/km²). There were 2,828 housing units at an average density of 5 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.70% White, 0.02% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.33% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. 1.01% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,541 households out of which 27.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.80% were married couples living together, 5.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.50% were non-families. 31.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.90.

The county population contained 24.10% under the age of 18, 4.90% from 18 to 24, 22.30% from 25 to 44, 24.20% from 45 to 64, and 24.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 95.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,740, and the median income for a family was $38,346. Males had a median income of $26,964 versus $18,275 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,043. About 7.60% of families and 10.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.80% of those under age 18 and 11.00% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Politics

Thayer County voters are reliably Republican. In only one national election since 1936 has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate (as of 2016).

Presidential election results
Presidential Elections Results [17]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 76.3%2,05118.6% 4995.2% 140
2012 70.5%1,87427.4% 7282.1% 57
2008 65.8%1,74932.3% 8601.9% 50
2004 72.1%2,07526.6% 7641.4% 39
2000 69.7%2,09627.3% 8213.0% 89
1996 56.8%1,69831.2% 93312.0% 358
1992 40.8%1,39127.1% 92432.1% 1,095
1988 59.6%1,98139.8% 1,3220.7% 23
1984 72.7%2,58026.6% 9460.7% 25
1980 68.9%2,51425.4% 9265.8% 210
1976 59.4%1,99439.1% 1,3151.5% 51
1972 69.9%2,27430.1% 978
1968 65.3%2,33129.7% 1,0615.0% 177
1964 48.1% 2,13251.9%2,298
1960 67.4%3,20232.6% 1,550
1956 69.8%3,34630.2% 1,447
1952 75.9%3,99224.1% 1,266
1948 57.4%2,60142.6% 1,931
1944 68.4%3,55431.6% 1,644
1940 65.2%3,89334.8% 2,077
1936 42.9% 2,62855.8%3,4181.3% 79
1932 32.3% 1,87866.1%3,8411.6% 90
1928 61.8%3,55237.8% 2,1730.4% 23
1924 52.7%2,84731.8% 1,71915.4% 833
1920 73.3%3,45623.8% 1,1202.9% 138
1916 51.3%1,77245.7% 1,5813.0% 104
1912 21.4% 70345.3%1,49033.3% 1,097
1908 49.1%1,71448.8% 1,7032.2% 76
1904 62.5%1,93026.3% 81211.2% 347
1900 54.1%1,82544.9% 1,5161.0% 33

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. Retrieved September 22, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  3. Fitzpatrick, Lilian Linder (1925). Nebraska Place-Names. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Studies in Language, Literature, and Criticism. p. 138. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  4. "Nebraska Historic Buildings Survey Reconnaissance Survey Final Report of Thayer County, Nebraska" (PDF). Nebraska State Historical Society. August 1, 1991. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  5. Andreas, A. T. (1882). "Andreas' History of the State of Nebraska". The Kansas Collection. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  6. "Thayer County". Nebraska Association of County Officials. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  7. Thayer County NE Google Maps (accessed 25 January 2019)
  8. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  9. Prairie Marsh State Wildlife Management Area, Bruning NE Google Maps (accessed 25 January 2019)
  10. Prairie Marsh West State Wildlife Management Area, Carleton NE Google Maps (accessed 25 January 2019)
  11. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  12. "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  13. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  14. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  15. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  16. "American FactFinder". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 31 January 2008.
  17. Election Results

Official website

Coordinates: 40°11′N97°35′W / 40.18°N 97.59°W / 40.18; -97.59