The Corner

Last updated
The Corner
The Corner.jpg
The Corner DVD cover
Genre Drama
Based on The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood
by David Simon
Ed Burns
Written byDavid Simon
David Mills
Directed by Charles S. Dutton
Starring T. K. Carter
Khandi Alexander
Sean Nelson
Theme music composer Corey Harris
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of episodes6
Production
Producers Robert F. Colesberry
David Mills
David Simon
Nina Kostroff Noble
Production locations Baltimore, Maryland
CinematographyIvan Strasburg
Running time59–73 minutes
Production companiesBlown Deadline Productions
HBO Films
Knee Deep Productions
Release
Original network HBO
Original releaseApril 16 (2000-04-16) 
May 21, 2000 (2000-05-21)

The Corner is a 2000 HBO drama television miniseries based on the nonfiction book The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood (1997) by David Simon and Ed Burns, and adapted for television by David Simon and David Mills. It premiered on HBO in the United States on April 16, 2000 and concluded its six-part run on May 21, 2000. The series was released on DVD on July 22, 2003. [1] It won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries in 2000.

Contents

The Corner chronicles the life of a family living in poverty amid the open-air drug markets of West Baltimore. "The corner" is the junction of West Fayette Street and North Monroe Street (U.S. Route 1) ( 39°17′22″N76°38′49″W / 39.289372°N 76.646848°W / 39.289372; -76.646848 ).

Cast and characters

Many actors from The Corner had also appeared in Homicide: Life on the Street (1993–1999), which was adapted from Simon's book, Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets (1991). Similarly, many actors who appeared in The Corner later appeared in Simon's next television series, The Wire (2002–2008), often playing contrasting characters, e.g., Clarke Peters, Maria Broom, Corey Parker Robinson, Reg E. Cathey, Clayton LeBouef, Donnell Rawlings, Tootsie Duvall, Robert F. Chew, Lance Reddick, Delaney Williams, and DeAndre McCullough (as an assistant to Brother Mouzone [4] ). Additionally, Alexander and Peters later starred in Simon's television series Treme (2010–2013), and DeAndre McCullough (who also played a bit role in The Corner, as a policeman who arrested 15-year-old DeAndre [3] [4] ) briefly worked for the show in set construction and on the security crew. [4] [5] [6]

Reception

A review by Hugh K. David of DVD Times praised The Corner as "raw, gritty, uncompromising, realistic, smartly directed, supremely well-acted, compulsively watchable, but harrowing and with little light at the end of the tunnel", comparing it to the television equivalent of such films as Last Exit to Brooklyn (1989) and Requiem for a Dream (2000; also adapted from novels), with elements in common with both La Haine (1995) and City of God (2002). [7]

Awards

The miniseries received three Emmy awards at the 52nd Primetime Emmy Awards. It won for Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries; Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Charles S. Dutton) and Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries or a Movie (David Simon and David Mills); and was nominated for Outstanding Casting for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special. [8] It also won a Peabody Award in 2000. [9]

Episodes

Each episode starts and ends with a documentary style interview, wherein a lead character answers questions posed by the director, Charles S. Dutton.

No.TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal air date
1"Gary's Blues" Charles S. Dutton David Simon & David Mills April 16, 2000 (2000-04-16)
Thirty-four year-old Gary McCullough has seen four years of drug addiction strip him of his money, his career, and his family. Now he has one mission: to get his next drug fix. When he's not shooting up with his girlfriend Ronnie - a ruthless, scheming addict who even steals from Gary when he isn't looking - he scours the neighborhood for heroin or spare cigarettes, and scrounges for money selling scrap metal and stolen appliances.
2"DeAndre's Blues"Charles S. DuttonDavid Simon & David MillsApril 23, 2000 (2000-04-23)
DeAndre spends his life walking a fine line between childhood and maturity - a very fine line, since both of his parents are addicts, and he's been dealing drugs since he was 13 years old. DeAndre hangs out with his girlfriend Tyreeka while struggling to attend school so he can achieve a promotion from 9th to 10th grade. After getting into a fight with his mother, Fran, he leaves to stay with his father, Gary, who ends up stealing some of his drugs.
3"Fran's Blues"Charles S. DuttonDavid MillsApril 30, 2000 (2000-04-30)
Fran has her own drug habit but 15-year-old DeAndre helps support her and his younger half brother De'Rodd by selling cocaine on the corner. Fran's admonitions to her son against selling drugs continue to go unheeded, and DeAndre gets busted again. This time, to teach him a lesson, Fran makes no effort to get him out, and he is transferred to "Boy's Village", where he gets a wake-up call. The real Fran Boyd makes a cameo appearance in this episode, as a receptionist.
4"Dope Fiend Blues"Charles S. DuttonDavid SimonMay 7, 2000 (2000-05-07)
Attempting to go straight, Gary gets a seasonal job at the crab market where he worked in his youth. When an addict gets shot, a local artist named Blue realizes the time to clean up his life is now or never. DeAndre has a new girlfriend, not knowing that Tyreeka, whom he's been ignoring, is pregnant with his child. With his mother in rehab, DeAndre turns to Gary for some money to feed the family. The real DeAndre McCullough makes a cameo appearance in this episode, as the police officer arresting Blue; the real Tyreeka Freamon makes a cameo appearance in this episode, as a Checkers employee; and the real George "Blue" Epps makes a cameo appearance in this episode, as a counselor.
5"Corner Boy Blues"Charles S. DuttonDavid Simon & David MillsMay 14, 2000 (2000-05-14)
Things are going well for Fran, who proudly moves the family into a new home, but not so well for Gary, who loses his job as the crab season ends. With a baby on the way, DeAndre attempts to walk a straight line, taking a job at a fast food restaurant while still earning off the corner and agreeing to a midnight curfew imposed by Fran. Drugs are starting to take their toll on the aging corner seller, Curt, who collapses and ends up in the hospital.
6"Everyman's Blues"Charles S. DuttonDavid Simon & David MillsMay 21, 2000 (2000-05-21)
The entire Boyd family gathers for Thanksgiving, a celebration that also marks the birth of DeAndre's son. It is a happy time for all, but it is to be short-lived as old addictions are revisited and new ones are born. DeAndre himself falls into a life of drug use.

Related Research Articles

Khandi Alexander American dancer, choreographer, and actress

Harriet Rene "Khandi" Alexander is an American dancer, choreographer, and actress. She began her career as a dancer in the 1980s and was a choreographer for Whitney Houston's world tours from 1988 to 1992.

Jean Smart American actress

Jean Elizabeth Smart is an American actress. After beginning her career in regional theater in the Pacific Northwest, she appeared on Broadway in 1981 as Marlene Dietrich in the biographical play Piaf. Smart was later cast in a leading role as Charlene Frazier Stillfield on the CBS sitcom Designing Women, in which she starred from 1986 to 1991.

<i>The Wire</i> American crime drama television series

The Wire is an American crime drama television series created and primarily written by author and former police reporter David Simon. The series was broadcast by the cable network HBO in the United States. The Wire premiered on June 2, 2002 and ended on March 9, 2008, comprising 60 episodes over five seasons. The idea for the show started out as a police drama loosely based on the experiences of his writing partner Ed Burns, a former homicide detective and public school teacher.

David McCullough American historian and author

David Gaub McCullough is an American author, narrator, popular historian, and lecturer. He is a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian award.

The Golden Globe Awardfor Best Miniseries or Television Film is one of the annual Golden Globe Awards given to the best miniseries or made-for-television film.

David Simon American author, journalist, and television writer and producer

David Judah Simon is an American author, journalist, and television writer and producer best known for his work on The Wire (2002–08). He worked for The Baltimore Sun City Desk for twelve years (1982–95), wrote Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets (1991), and co-wrote The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood (1997) with Ed Burns. The former book was the basis for the NBC series Homicide: Life on the Street (1993–99), on which Simon served as a writer and producer. Simon adapted the latter book into the HBO mini-series The Corner (2000).

57th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 57th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 18, 2005 and was hosted by Ellen DeGeneres. The ceremony was broadcast on CBS. BBC America received its first major nomination this year.

Edward P. Burns is an American screenwriter, novelist, and producer. He has worked closely with writing partner David Simon. For HBO, they have collaborated on The Corner,The Wire,Generation Kill, and The Plot Against America. Burns is a former Baltimore police detective for the Homicide and Narcotics divisions, and a public school teacher. He often draws upon these experiences for his writing.

<i>The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood</i>

The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood is a 1997 book written by Baltimore Sun reporter David Simon and former Baltimore homicide detective Ed Burns. This book follows the lives of individuals who lived on the corner of Fayette Street and Monroe Street in West Baltimore over one year. It was named Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times.

Robert F. "Bob" Colesberry Jr. was an American film and television producer, best known as a co-creator of the television series The Wire (2002–2008) for HBO, executive producer of the miniseries The Corner (2000), and a producer for Martin Scorsese's After Hours (1985), Alan Parker's Mississippi Burning (1988), and Billy Crystal's 61* (2001). Colesberry was also an occasional actor.

David Mills (TV writer) American journalist and TV writer (1961-2010)

David Eugene Mills was an American journalist, writer and producer of television programs. He was an executive producer and writer of the HBO miniseries The Corner, for which he won two Emmy Awards, and the creator, executive producer, and writer of the NBC miniseries Kingpin.

<i>The Wire</i> (season 1)

The first season of the television series The Wire commenced airing on Sunday, June 2, 2002 at 9:00 pm ET in the United States and concluded on September 8, 2002. The 13 episodes tell the story from the points of view of both the drug-dealing Barksdale organization and the investigating police detail.

-30- (<i>The Wire</i>) 10th episode of the fifth season of The Wire

"-30-" is the series finale of the HBO original series The Wire. With a running time of 93 minutes, this tenth and final episode of the fifth season is the longest episode of the series. The episode was written by series creator/executive producer David Simon (teleplay/story) and co-executive producer Ed Burns (story). It was directed by Clark Johnson, who also directed the pilot episode and stars on the show. It aired on March 9, 2008. The episode's writers were nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series.

James Yoshimura is an American writer and producer, best known for his screenwriting work on the NBC series Homicide: Life on the Street and the short-lived Fox series The Jury, for which he served as a co-creator. He also co-wrote Homicide: The Movie, a made-for-television film that came out in 2000, after the series ended. Yoshimura has received two Emmy Award nominations: one for Homicide: The Movie and one for the Homicide episode "Subway", which also won a Peabody Award for excellence in television broadcasting.

62nd Primetime Emmy Awards Award

The 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards, presented by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, were held on Sunday, August 29, 2010, at the Nokia Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles, California beginning at 5:00 p.m. PDT. Comedian and Late Night host Jimmy Fallon hosted the ceremony for the first time.

63rd Primetime Emmy Awards Award

The 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards, honoring the best in prime time television programming from June 1, 2010 until May 31, 2011, were held on Sunday, September 18, 2011, at the Nokia Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles, California. Fox televised the ceremony within the United States. Jane Lynch hosted the Emmys for the first time. The Creative Arts Emmy Awards ceremony was held on September 10.

64th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, honoring the best in prime time television programming from June 1, 2011 until May 31, 2012, were held on Sunday, September 23, 2012 at the Nokia Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles, California. ABC televised the ceremony in the United States. Comedian and late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel hosted the Primetime Emmys for the first time. Kimmel and Kerry Washington announced the nominations on July 19, 2012. Nick Offerman was originally scheduled to co-announce the nominations, but had to cancel due to travel delays. The Creative Arts Emmy Awards ceremony was held on September 15 and was televised on September 22, 2012 on ReelzChannel.

66th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards honored the best in U.S. prime time television programming from June 1, 2013 until May 31, 2014, as chosen by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The ceremony was held on Monday, August 25, 2014, at the Nokia Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles, California, and was broadcast in the U.S. by NBC. Comedian and Late Night host Seth Meyers hosted the ceremony for the first time. The nominations were announced on July 10, 2014.

67th Primetime Emmy Awards Award

The 67th Primetime Emmy Awards honored the best in U.S. prime time television programming from June 1, 2014 until May 31, 2015, as chosen by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The ceremony was held on Sunday, September 20, 2015 at the Microsoft Theater in Downtown Los Angeles, California, and was broadcast in the U.S. by Fox. Andy Samberg hosted the show for the first time. The nominations were announced on July 16, 2015.

The Triple Crown of Acting is a term used in the American entertainment industry to describe actors who have won a competitive Academy Award, Emmy Award, and Tony Award in the acting categories, the highest accolades recognized in American film, television and theatre respectively. As of today, only 24 people have achieved the triple crown of acting. Helen Hayes was the first person to achieve the triple crown with her Emmy Award win on February 5, 1953. Thomas Mitchell became the first man to achieve the triple crown with his Tony Award win later the same year on March 29, 1953. Hayes and Rita Moreno are the only triple crown winners in competitive acting categories who have also won a Grammy Award to complete the EGOT. Dame Maggie Smith has the most triple crown wins, with 7 awards.

References

  1. "The Corner (HBO Miniseries) (2000)" . Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  2. Slotnik, Daniel E. (December 14, 2012). "Donnie Andrews, the Real-Life Omar Little, Dies at 58". The New York Times. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  3. 1 2 Slotnik, Daniel E. (August 9, 2012). "DeAndre McCullough, Drug Dealer Who Inspired 'The Corner,' Dies at 35". The New York Times. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  4. 1 2 3 Swarnsaug, Rachel L. (August 29, 2012). "A Better Life Eternally Eluded the Boy From 'The Corner'". The New York Times. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  5. Simon, David (August 3, 2012). "My Books • Treme: DeAndre McCullough (1977-2012)". DavidSimon.com. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  6. Fenton, Justice (August 3, 2012). "McCullough, portrayed in "The Corner", dies of apparent overdose". Baltimore Sun. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  7. David, Hugh K. (July 23, 2005). "Review of The Corner". The Digital Fix. Home Cinema. Retrieved September 26, 2009.
  8. "The Corner". Emmys.com. Retrieved September 29, 2014.
  9. "The Corner". The Peabody Awards. May 2001. Retrieved September 29, 2014.
  10. Simon, Scott (Anchor) & Simon, David (October 6, 2011). "A Return to The Corner". Need to Know. PBS.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  11. Wang, Jessica (October 7, 2011). "Help Wanted: On 'The Corner' with David Simon". Need to Know. PBS.
  12. Simon, Scott (Anchor) & Simon, David (March 15, 2012). "The Corner, Revisited". Need to Know. PBS.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  13. Wang, Jessica (March 16, 2012). "'The Corner,' revisited: Have recent economic gains changed anything in inner city Baltimore?". Need to Know. PBS.

Further reading