Accretion (coastal management)

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Accretion is the process of coastal sediment returning to the visible portion of a beach or foreshore following a submersion event. A sustainable beach or foreshore often goes through a cycle of submersion during rough weather then accretion during calmer periods. If a coastline is not in a healthy sustainable state, then erosion can be more serious and accretion does not fully restore the original volume of the visible beach or foreshore leading to permanent beach loss.


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Coastal erosion The loss or displacement of land along the coastline due to the action of waves, currents, tides. wind-driven water, waterborne ice, or other impacts of storms

There are two common definitions of coastal erosion. First, coastal erosion is often defined as the loss or displacement of land along the coastline due to the action of waves, currents, tides, wind-driven water, waterborne ice, or other impacts of storms. This landward retreat of the shoreline is measured to a given datum over a temporal scale of tides, seasons, and other short-term cyclic processes. Finally, coastal erosion is also defined as the process of long-term removal of sediment and rocks at the coastline, leading to loss of land and retreat of the coastline landward. It may be caused by hydraulic action, abrasion, impact and corrosion by wind, water, and other forces, natural or unnatural.

Accretion may refer to:

Merricks Beach, Victoria Town in Victoria, Australia

Merricks Beach is a small seaside village on the Mornington Peninsula Victoria, Australia. It is located on the eastern side of the peninsula on Western Port Bay. It is one of the few coastal places within a 100 km radius of Melbourne that has been basically untouched by development. Its local government area is the Shire of Mornington Peninsula.

Somers, Victoria Town in Victoria, Australia

Somers is a small town approximately 72 km south-east of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, in the south-eastern corner of the Mornington Peninsula on Western Port. Its local government area is the Shire of Mornington Peninsula.

The New Zealand foreshore and seabed controversy is a debate in the politics of New Zealand. It concerns the ownership of the country's foreshore and seabed, with many Māori groups claiming that Māori have a rightful claim to title. These claims are based around historical possession and the Treaty of Waitangi. On 18 November 2004, the New Zealand Parliament passed a law which deems the title to be held by the Crown. This law, the Foreshore and Seabed Act 2004, was enacted on 24 November 2004. Some sections of the Act came into force on 17 January 2005. It was repealed and replaced by the Marine and Coastal Area Act 2011.

Beach nourishment

Beach nourishment describes a process by which sediment, usually sand, lost through longshore drift or erosion is replaced from other sources. A wider beach can reduce storm damage to coastal structures by dissipating energy across the surf zone, protecting upland structures and infrastructure from storm surges, tsunamis and unusually high tides. Beach nourishment is typically part of a larger coastal defense scheme. Nourishment is typically a repetitive process since it does not remove the physical forces that cause erosion but simply mitigates their effects.

Ocean Reef, Western Australia Suburb of Perth, Western Australia

Ocean Reef is a suburb in northern Perth, Western Australia. It is located within the City of Joondalup. The name was coined by developers in the 1970s from the line of a reef visible several kilometres offshore. The name was formally adopted in 1974, replacing the prior name of Beaumaris, a name still retained by one of the shopping centres and one primary school.

Kingscliff, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Kingscliff is a coastal town just south of Tweed Heads in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia, and is a beach community offering a variety of holiday accommodations. Together with the villages of Chinderah and Fingal, it is a tourist destination that provides beach and estuary access for swimming, surfing, fishing and water sports.

Intertidal zone The area of coast between low and high tide marks

The intertidal zone, also known as the foreshore and seashore and sometimes referred to as the littoral zone, is the area that is above water at low tide and underwater at high tide. This area can include many different types of habitats, with many types of animals, such as starfish, sea urchins, and numerous species of coral.

Submersion may refer to:

Christies Beach, South Australia Suburb of Adelaide, South Australia

Christies Beach is a seaside suburb in the southern Adelaide metropolitan area, within the City of Onkaparinga. The area is scenic and hence popular with photographers as Witton Bluff provides a natural vantage point over the entire suburb and beyond.

The Strand, Townsville seaside foreshore precinct located in Townsville, Australia

The Strand is a seaside foreshore located in Townsville, Australia. It is located in the suburb of North Ward. The Strand has a view of the Port of Townsville and Magnetic Island, as well as to Cape Cleveland. Features in the area include a jetty, a recreational park, restaurants, cafes and pools.

The shoreline is where the land meets the sea and it is continually changing. Over the long term, the water is eroding the land. Beaches represent a special case, in that they exist where sand accumulated from the same processes that strip away rocky and sedimentary material. That is, they can grow as well as erode. River deltas are another exception, in that silt that erodes up river can accrete at the river's outlet and extend ocean shorelines. Catastrophic events such as tsunamis, hurricanes and storm surges accelerate beach erosion, potentially carrying away the entire sand load. Human activities can be as catastrophic as hurricanes, albeit usually over a longer time interval.

Moana, South Australia Suburb of Adelaide, South Australia

Moana is an outer coastal suburb in the south of Adelaide, South Australia. The suburb is approximately 36.4 km from the Adelaide city centre. It lies within the City of Onkaparinga local government area, and neighbours the suburbs Seaford, Maslin Beach, Seaford Rise and Port Noarlunga

Foreshore Estate neighbourhood in Chennai District, Tamil Nadu, India

Foreshore Estate is a neighbourhood in Chennai, India. It is situated along the southern stretch of the Marina Beach.

Newcastle East, New South Wales Suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

Newcastle East is an inner city suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, located immediately east of Newcastle's central business district at the mouth of the Hunter River. The suburb includes Fort Scratchley, Newcastle Ocean Baths and Newcastle Beach. Formerly a site of heavy industry and railway yards, the suburb now contains the large Foreshore Park, and historic terraced housing.

Submersion is the sustainable cyclic portion of coastal erosion where coastal sediments move from the visible portion of a beach to the submerged nearshore region, and later return to the original visible portion of the beach. The recovery portion of the sustainable cycle of sediment behaviour is (accretion).

The Sangameswara temple is a Hindu temple in the Kurnool district, Andhra Pradesh, India. It is located near Muchumarri at the confluence of the Krishna and Bhavanasi rivers, in the foreshore of the Srisailam reservoir, where it is submerged for part of the time, surfacing when the water level recedes to a sufficient degree. It was first submerged after the Srisailam Dam was constructed in 1981, and first surfaced in 2003.

Narrawallee Town in New South Wales, Australia

Narrawallee is a coastal village in the South Coast region of New South Wales, Australia. At the 2016 census, it had a population of 2,447. The village, along with its southern neighbours Mollymook and Mollymook Beach are generally considered part of the Milton-Ulladulla district within the City of Shoalhaven local government area. Narrawallee is predominantly a residential suburb, bordered by a tidal inlet to the north and Matron Porter Drive. The name "Narrawallee" is taken from the creek which flows eastwards from Milton and its estuary on the Tasman Sea and is itself a corruption of the Aboriginal words Nurrawerree or Narra Warra.

Harwich Foreshore

Harwich Foreshore is a 10.6 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Harwich in Essex. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.