Bristow, Oklahoma

Last updated
Bristow, Oklahoma
City
Bristow street scene.jpg
Main Street in Bristow
Nickname(s): The Woodland Queen
Creek County Oklahoma incorporated and unincorporated areas Bristow highlighted.svg
Location within Creek County, and the state of Oklahoma
Coordinates: 35°49′51″N96°23′26″W / 35.83083°N 96.39056°W / 35.83083; -96.39056 Coordinates: 35°49′51″N96°23′26″W / 35.83083°N 96.39056°W / 35.83083; -96.39056
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Creek
Area
  Total3.6 sq mi (9.3 km2)
  Land3.6 sq mi (9.2 km2)
  Water0.08 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation810 ft (247 m)
Population (2010)
  Total4,222
  Density1,194/sq mi (460.9/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code 74010
Area code(s) 539/918
FIPS code 40-08900 [1]
GNIS feature ID1090502 [2]
Website www.cityofbristowok.org

Bristow is a city in Creek County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 4,222 at the 2010 census, [3] down 2.4 percent from 4,325 at the 2000 census.

Creek County, Oklahoma County in the United States

Creek County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 69,967. Its county seat is Sapulpa.

Oklahoma State of the United States of America

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million, as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

History

Bristow began in 1898, when the St. Louis–San Francisco Railway ("Frisco") built a track between Sapulpa and Oklahoma City. The town was named for Joseph L. Bristow, a U.S. senator from Kansas. A post office was established April 25, 1898. By the 1900 census, the population was 626. [4]

St. Louis–San Francisco Railway defunct American Class I railway

The St. Louis–San Francisco Railway, also known as the Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. At the end of 1970 it operated 4,547 miles (7,318 km) of road on 6,574 miles (10,580 km) of track, not including subsidiaries Quanah, Acme and Pacific Railway or the Alabama, Tennessee and Northern Railroad; that year it reported 12,795 million ton-miles of revenue freight and no passengers. It was purchased and absorbed into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1980. Despite its name, it never came close to San Francisco.

Sapulpa, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Sapulpa is a city in Creek and Tulsa counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 20,544 at the 2010 United States census, compared to 19,166 at the 2000 census. As of 2013 the estimated population was 20,836. It is the county seat of Creek County.

Oklahoma City State capital city in Oklahoma, United States

Oklahoma City, often shortened to OKC, is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County, the city ranks 27th among United States cities in population. The population grew following the 2010 Census, with the population estimated to have increased to 643,648 as of July 2017. As of 2015, the Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,358,452, and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,459,758 residents, making it Oklahoma's largest metropolitan area.

Bristow was designated as the county seat for Creek County at statehood when its population was 1,134. However, the county held a special election on August 20, 1908, to decide whether the seat would remain in Bristow or move to Sapulpa, which claimed to be more centrally located. Bristow had a larger population and claimed to have better railroad connections. Sapulpa won the election, but Bristow claimed voting irregularities. The election was voided and a new vote was held November 20, 1912. Again, Sapulpa won the election and the title of county seat. [4]

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

The local economy depended heavily on cotton. Bristow had seven cotton gins and two cottonseed oil mills in the early 20th century. Other farms in the surrounding area produced corn, peanuts, potatoes and fruit. Oil and gas were discovered in the area around 1915. The discovery led to the construction of three refineries and four pipeline companies by 1930. The Oklahoma-Southwestern Railway Company built a short line from the oilfields to Bristow in 1920. The peak census population was 6,619 in 1930 [4]

Cotton plant fiber from the genus Gossypium

Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the mallow family Malvaceae. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds.

Cotton gin machine that separates cotton fibers from seeds

A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, enabling much greater productivity than manual cotton separation. The fibers are then processed into various cotton goods such as linens, while any undamaged cotton is used largely for textiles like clothing. The separated seeds may be used to grow more cotton or to produce cottonseed oil.

Cottonseed oil cooking oil extracted from the seeds of cotton plants of various species, mainly Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium herbaceum

Cottonseed oil is a cooking oil extracted from the seeds of cotton plants of various species, mainly Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium herbaceum, that are grown for cotton fiber, animal feed, and oil.

Historic buildings

Several sites in Bristow are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Beard Motor Company, Bristow Chrysler Plymouth, Bristow Motor Company Building, Bristow Presbyterian Church, Bristow Tire Shop, Little Deep Fork Creek Bridge, and Texaco Service Station. [5]

National Register of Historic Places listings in Creek County, Oklahoma Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Creek County, Oklahoma.

Bristow Presbyterian Church

Bristow Presbyterian Church is a congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA). The church was organized on October 21, 1917. The church building was erected in 1922 and added to the National Historic Register in 1979. Featuring Tiffany stained glass windows and a beautiful organ, the Sanctuary has been described as a pocket cathedral. It is located at the corner of West 6th and Elm in Bristow, Oklahoma.

Geography

Bristow is located in northern Oklahoma, just south of the geographic center of Creek County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.6 square miles (9.3 km2), of which 3.6 square miles (9.2 km2) is land and 0.08 square miles (0.2 km2), or 1.66%, is water. [3] The geographic coordinates of Bristow are 35°49′51″N96°23′26″W / 35.83083°N 96.39056°W / 35.83083; -96.39056 (35.830720, -96.390675). [6]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Interstate 44, the Turner Turnpike, passes through the northern part of the city, with access from Exit 196. I-44 leads northeast 20 miles (32 km) to Sapulpa and 33 miles (53 km) to downtown Tulsa, and southwest 76 miles (122 km) to Oklahoma City. Oklahoma State Highway 66, formerly U.S. Route 66, passes through the center of Bristow and generally parallels I-44.

Climate

Climate data for Bristow, Oklahoma
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)49.5
(9.7)
55.3
(12.9)
65.3
(18.5)
75.4
(24.1)
81.3
(27.4)
88.5
(31.4)
94.9
(34.9)
94.2
(34.6)
86.0
(30)
76.8
(24.9)
63.0
(17.2)
52.3
(11.3)
73.5
(23.1)
Average low °F (°C)23.9
(−4.5)
28.6
(−1.9)
38.0
(3.3)
49.1
(9.5)
57.0
(13.9)
65.2
(18.4)
69.2
(20.7)
67.5
(19.7)
60.0
(15.6)
49.2
(9.6)
38.0
(3.3)
27.8
(−2.3)
47.8
(8.8)
Average precipitation inches (mm)1.4
(36)
1.9
(48)
3.0
(76)
3.3
(84)
5.5
(140)
3.9
(99)
2.7
(69)
2.7
(69)
4.6
(117)
3.2
(81)
2.9
(74)
2.1
(53)
37.2
(945)
Source: Weatherbase.com [7]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 626
1910 1,667166.3%
1920 3,460107.6%
1930 6,63091.6%
1940 6,050−8.7%
1950 5,400−10.7%
1960 4,795−11.2%
1970 4,653−3.0%
1980 4,7021.1%
1990 4,062−13.6%
2000 4,3256.5%
2010 4,222−2.4%
Est. 20154,248 [8] 0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census [1] of 2000, there were 4,325 people, 1,793 households, and 1,161 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,299.2 people per square mile (501.5/km²). There were 2,019 housing units at an average density of 606.5 per square mile (234.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 75.42% White, 8.51% African American, 10.64% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.44% from other races, and 4.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.01% of the population.

There were 1,793 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the city, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $24,351, and the median income for a family was $31,618. Males had a median income of $28,475 versus $21,711 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,819. About 15.8% of families and 20.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 34.5% of those under age 18 and 14.3% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

From its inception, Bristow's economy centered on agriculture, and specifically on growing and processing cotton. By the early 1900s, Bristow had seven cotton gins and two cotton-seed oil mills. Additionally, other farmers in the area produced corn, peanuts, Irish potatoes, and fruits. [4]

Oil and natural gas were discovered nearby in 1914 - 1915, producing an economic boom lasting until 1923. The boom also caused a population spike. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, nearly 31,000 people lived within a few miles radius of Bristow in 1920. [4]

Although the boom cooled by 1925, by 1930 the city was the site of three oil refineries, four pipeline facilities and offices for several petroleum-related companies. KFRU, one of Oklahoma's first radio stations, started broadcasting from Bristow in January 1925. [4]

Some manufacturing facilities were added during the 1960s, including Bristow Mattress Factory, the Glassmarc Corporation (manufacturer of fiberglass boats and other items), Artemis Incorporated (manufacturer of women's garments), and the U.S. Carpet Company. [4]

Government

Bristow has a home-rule charter form of government. [4]

Notable people

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References

  1. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Bristow city, Oklahoma". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Wilson, Linda D. "Bristow". Oklahoma Historical Society. Archived from the original on 28 April 2017. Retrieved 7 May 2017.
  5. "OKLAHOMA - Creek County". National Register of Historic Places.com. Archived from the original on 11 September 2016. Retrieved 7 May 2017.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. "Historical Weather for Bristow, Oklahoma, United States".
  8. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on 2016-06-02. Retrieved July 2, 2016.
  9. "Josiah "Joe" Henson". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 3 December 2016. Retrieved 8 May 2017.