List of retired Philippine typhoon names

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The Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) for tropical cyclone warnings PAGASA Philippine Area of Responsibility - en.svg
The Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) for tropical cyclone warnings

Since 1963, there have been three agencies who have named tropical cyclones within the north western Pacific Ocean which has often resulted in a cyclone having two names. From 1945 to 2000 the US Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center assigned names to tropical cyclones before the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), took over the naming of tropical cyclones in 2000. Both agencies assigned names to tropical cyclones when they intensified into a tropical storm.

Pacific Ocean Ocean between Asia and Australia in the west, the Americas in the east and Antarctica or the Southern Ocean in the south.

The Pacific Ocean is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Southern Ocean in the south and is bounded by Asia and Australia in the west and the Americas in the east.

Japan Meteorological Agency meteorological service of Japan

The Japan Meteorological Agency, JMA, is an agency of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. It is charged with gathering and providing results for the public in Japan, that are obtained from data based on daily scientific observation and research into natural phenomena in the fields of meteorology, hydrology, seismology and volcanology, among other related scientific fields. Its headquarters is located in Chiyoda, Tokyo.

Contents

Since 1963 the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has assigned local names to a tropical cyclone should it move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N-25°N even if the cyclone has had an international name assigned to it. All three agencies that have assigned names to tropical cyclones within the Western Pacific have retired the names of significant tropical cyclones, with PAGASA retiring names if a cyclone has caused at least

Since 1963 the naming lists have been revised in 1979, 1985, 2001 and 2005 for various reasons including to help minimize confusion in the historical records and to remove the names that might have negative associations with real persons. [1] [2] Within this list all information with regards to intensity is taken from while the system was in the Philippine area of responsibility and is thus taken from PAGASA's archives, rather than the JTWC or JMA's archives.

Pre 2000

Gathering of 10-minute sustained wind data had started in the 1978 Pacific typhoon season.

1978 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 1978 Pacific typhoon season was a very active season that lasted more than a year. It has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1978, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

PAGASA
Name
WMO
name
Replacement
name
Dates activePAGASA
Category
Sustained
wind speeds
PressureAreas affectedDamage
(PHP)
DeathsMissingRefs
DadingWinnieDidangJune 26 - July 3, 1964Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Central LuzonUnknown100 [3]
WelmingEmmaWarlingOctober 31 - November 8, 1967Super Typhoon260 km/h (160 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Eastern, Northeastern Visayas and Southern Luzon30064 [3]
PitangGeorgiaPasingSeptember 8–14, 1970Super Typhoon260 km/h (160 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Northern Luzon9580 [3]
Sening JoanSusangOctober 10–18, 1970Super Typhoon280 km/h (175 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Southern Luzon, Northeastern Visayas768193 [3]
Titang KateTeringOctober 14–25, 1970Super Typhoon240 km/h (150 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Mindanao, Western Visayas1,551284 [3]
Yoling PatsyYaningNovember 14 – 22, 1970Super Typhoon260 km/h (155 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Luzon61181 [3] [4] [5]
WeningElaineWelingOctober 23 - November 1, 1974Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Northern Luzon23 [3]
Didang OlgaDitangMay 10 – 28, 1976Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Luzon374 [3] [5]
Atang OliveAkangApril 15 – 26, 1978Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)955 hPa (28.20 inHg)Visayas, Southern Luzon111 [3] [6]
Kading RitaKatringOctober 15–29, 1978Super Typhoon220 km/h (140 mph)880 hPa (25.99 inHg)Central Luzon444354
Nitang IkeNingningAugust 26 – September 6, 1984Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Visayas, Northern Mindanao3,000 [3] [7] [8]
Undang AgnesUnsangOctober 30 – November 8, 1984Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Visayas, Southern Luzon895275 [3] [7] [8]
Herming BettyHelmingAugust 16 – 30, 1987Super Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)890 hPa (26.28 inHg)Southern Luzon, Eastern Visayas94 [3] [8] [9]
Sisang NinaSendangNovember 16 – 30, 1987Super Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Southern Luzon808 [3] [7] [10]
Unsang RubyUlpiangOctober 20 – 28, 1988Typhoon140 km/h (85  mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon157 [nb 1] [3] [8]
Yoning SkipYerlingNovember 3 – 12, 1988Typhoon150 km/h (90  mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Eastern Visayas, Southern Luzon21795 [3] [5] [11]
Ruping MikeRitangNovember 5 – 18, 1990Super Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Visayas748246 [3] [10] [12] [13]
Uring ThelmaUldingNovember 1 – 8, 1991Tropical Storm85 km/h (50 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Visayas5,9563,000 [3] [7] [10]
Monang LolaN/ADecember 1 – 9, 1993Typhoon85 km/h (50 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Visayas2300
Rosing AngelaReningOctober 25 – November 7, 1995Super Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Southern Luzon936 [3] [7] [12]
Iliang ZebN/AOctober 7–14, 1998Super Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Southern Luzon4629
Loleng BabsN/AOctober 15 – 24, 1998Super Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)940 hPa (27.38 inHg)Visayas, Luzon30329 [14] [15] [16]
22 names4730

2000s

Local
Name
WMO
name
Replacement
name
Dates activeCategoryWindPressureAreas affectedDamageDeathsMissingRefs
Gloria ChataanGlendaJune 27 — July 13, 2002Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Luzon18 [nb 2] [2] [17]
Harurot ImbudoHannaJuly 19 — 23, 2003Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon64 [18] [19]
Unding MuifaUlyssesNovember 14 — 21, 2004Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon6869 [20] [21]
Violeta MerbokVickyNovember 22 — 23, 2004Tropical Storm65 km/h (40 mph)1000 hPa (29.53 inHg)Luzon3117 [20] [21] [22]
Winnie -----WarrenNovember 27 — 30, 2004Tropical Depression55 km/h (35 mph)1000 hPa (29.53 inHg)Luzon1,619713 [20] [21]
Milenyo XangsaneMarioSeptember 25 — 29, 2006Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)972 hPa (28.71 inHg)Luzon, Visayas11079 [23] [24] [25]
Reming DurianRubyNovember 28 – December 2, 2006Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)938 hPa (27.70 inHg)Luzon, Visayas1,400762 [23] [26] [27] [28]
Cosme HalongCarinaMay 15 — 19, 2008Severe tropical Storm110 km/h (70 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Luzon513 [nb 3]
Frank FengshenFerdieJune 18 — 23, 2008Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)958 hPa (28.29 inHg)Luzon, Visayas1,50187 [nb 4] [23] [30] [31]
Ondoy KetsanaOdetteSeptember 24 — 27, 2009Typhoon130 km/h (80 mph)980 hPa (28.94 inHg)Luzon67137 [nb 3] [23] [32] [33]
Pepeng ParmaPaoloSeptember 30 – October 10, 2009Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)938 hPa (27.70 inHg)Visayas, Luzon46547 [nb 3] [23] [33] [34]
10 names>50241814

2010s

At the start of the decade the name Juan was retired after the 2010 season, after it had become a super typhoon and caused around

2015 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2015 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly above average season that produced 27 tropical storms, 18 typhoons, and nine super typhoons. The season ran throughout 2015, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and November. The season's first named storm, Mekkhala, developed on January 15, while the season's last named storm, Melor, dissipated on December 17. The season saw at least one named tropical system forming in each of every month, the first time since 1965. Similar to the previous season, this season saw a high number of super typhoons. Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) during 2015 was extremely high, the second highest since the 1970, and the 2015 ACE has been attributed in part to anthropogenic warming.

Local
Name
WMO
name
Replacement
name
Dates active
(within PAR)
PAGASA
Category
Sustained
wind speeds
PressureAreas affectedDamage
(PHP)
DeathsMissingRefs
Juan MegiJoseOctober 15 — 20, 2010Super Typhoon230 km/h (145 mph)885 hPa (26.13 inHg)Luzon264 [nb 3] [37] [38]
Bebeng AereBettyMay 6 – 10, 2011Tropical Storm75 km/h (45 mph)992 hPa (29.26 inHg)Luzon, Visayas352 [nb 3] [39] [40]
Juaning Nock-tenJennyJuly 24 – 28, 2011Severe tropical Storm95 km/h (60 mph)985 hPa (29.09 inHg)Visayas, Luzon770 [nb 3] [40] [41]
Mina NanmadolMarilynAugust 21 – 29, 2011Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Luzon360 [nb 3] [40] [42]
Pedring NesatPerlaSeptember 24 – 28, 2011Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon850 [nb 3] [40] [43]
Sendong WashiSarahDecember 14 – 18, 2011Severe Tropical Storm95 km/h (60 mph)992 hPa (29.41 inHg)Visayas, Mindanao2,546181 [nb 3] [44] [45]
Pablo BophaPepitoDecember 2 – 9, 2012Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Mindanao, Visayas, Luzon1,901844 [nb 3] [7] [46] [47]
Labuyo UtorLannieAugust 9 – 13, 2013Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Luzon113 [nb 6] [50] [51] [52]
Santi NariSalomeOctober 8 – 13, 2013Typhoon140 km/h (85 mph)965 hPa (28.5 inHg)Luzon155 [nb 6] [53]
Yolanda HaiyanYasminNovember 6 – 9, 2013Super Typhoon230 km/h (145 mph)895 hPa (26.43 inHg)Visayas, Mindoro, Palawan6,3001,081 [nb 6] [54] [55]
Glenda RammasunGardoJuly 13 – 17, 2014Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon1066 [nb 7] [56]
Jose HalongJosieAugust 2–7, 2014Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)920 hPa (27.17 inHg)Luzon20 [nb 7] [56]
Mario Fung-wongMaymaySeptember 17 – 21, 2014Tropical Storm85 km/h (50 mph)985 hPa (29.09 inHg)Luzon184 [nb 7] [56]
Ruby HagupitRositaDecember 3 – 10, 2014Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Visayas, Luzon180 [nb 7] [56] [58]
Seniang JangmiSamuelDecember 28–31, 2014Tropical Storm75 km/h (45 mph)996 hPa (29.41 inHg)Visayas, Mindanao666 [nb 7] [56]
Lando KoppuLiwaywayOctober 14 – 22, 2015Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)920 hPa (27.17 inHg)Luzon4883 [59] [60]
Nona MelorNimfaDecember 9 – 17, 2015Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon, Eastern Visayas424 [nb 8] [62] [63]
Karen SarikaKristineOctober 11 – 16, 2016Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon20 [nb 9] [65]
Lawin HaimaLeonOctober 16 – 21, 2016Super Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Luzon80 [nb 9] [66]
Nina Nock-tenNikaDecember 22 – 28, 2016Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Luzon816 [nb 9] [67]
Urduja Kai-takUwanDecember 11 – 19, 2017Tropical Storm75 km/h (45 mph)996 hPa (29.41 inHg)Visayas540 [nb 10] [69]
Vinta TembinVerbenaDecember 20 – 24, 2017Typhoon130 km/h (80 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Mindanao173176

[70] [71]

Ompong MangkhutObetSeptember 12 – 15, 2018Super Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Luzon1270 [70] [72]
Rosita YutuRosalOctober 27 – 31, 2018Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Central Luzon270 [70] [73]
Usman ----UmbertoDecember 25 – 29, 2018Tropical Depression55 km/h (35 mph)1000 hPa (29.53 inHg)Visayas, Southern Luzon1550 [70] [74]

See also

Typhoons in the Philippines

Approximately twenty tropical cycloness enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility yearly, an area which incorporates parts of the Pacific Ocean, South China Sea and the Philippine Archipelago. Among these cyclones, ten will be typhoons, with five having the potential to be destructive ones. The Philippines is "the most exposed country in the world to tropical storms" according to a Time Magazine article in 2013. In the Philippine languages, typhoons are called bagyo.

Notes

  1. The death and missing columns exclude deaths caused by Typhoon Ruby (Unsang), in the MV Doña Marilyn disaster.
  2. Retired in 2005 due to President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo's involvement in the Hello Garci scandal.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Reference for the names Cosme, Ondoy, Pepeng, Juan, Bebeng, Juaning, Mina, Pedring, Sendong, Pablo being retired. [29]
  4. The death and missing columns includes deaths caused by Typhoon Fengshen (Frank), in the MV Princess of the Stars disaster.
  5. Reference for the name Katring being retired. [35] [36]
  6. 1 2 3 Reference for the names Santi, Labuyo and Yolanda being retired. [48] [49]
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 References for the names Glenda, Jose, Mario, Ruby and Seniang being retired. [56] [57]
  8. The name Nonoy was retired because it was considered to sound like Noynoy, which was President Benigno Aquino III's nickname. [61]
  9. 1 2 3 Reference for the name Karen, Lawin and Nina being retired. [64]
  10. Reference for the name Urduja being retired. [68]

Related Research Articles

Typhoon Fengshen (2008) Pacific typhoon in 2008

Typhoon Fengshen, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Frank, was the sixth named storm and the fourth typhoon recognised by the Japan Meteorological Agency. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center recognised Fengshen as the seventh tropical depression, the sixth tropical storm, and fifth typhoon of the 2008 Pacific typhoon season.

Typhoon Nuri (2008) Pacific typhoon in 2008

Typhoon Nuri, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Karen, was the 12th named storm and the seventh typhoon that was recognised by the Japan Meteorological Agency. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center recognised it as the 13th tropical depression, the 12th tropical storm and the 8th typhoon of the 2008 Pacific typhoon season. The name Nuri was submitted to the World Meteorological Organisation's Typhoon Committee by Malaysia in 2003 after the name Rusa was retired in 2002. The name Nuri is Malay for a blue crowned parroquet, a type of parrot. The name Karen was assigned by PAGASA to a tropical depression for the second time, the other time being in 2004 to Typhoon Rananim.

2011 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2011 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average season that produced a total of 21 named storms, 8 typhoons, and four super typhoons. This season was much more active than the previous season, although both seasons were below the Pacific typhoon average of 26. The season ran throughout 2011, though most tropical cyclone tend to develop between May and October. The season’s first named storm, Aere, developed on May 7 while the season’s last named storm, Washi dissipated on December 19.

2013 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2013 Pacific typhoon season was the most active Pacific typhoon season since 2004, as well as the deadliest since 1975. It was an above-average season with 31 named storms, 13 typhoons, and five super typhoons. The season's first named storm, Sonamu, developed on January 4 while the season's last named storm, Podul, dissipated on November 15. Most of the first seventeen named storms before mid-September were relatively weak, as only two of them reached the typhoon strength.

2014 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2014 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average season, featuring 23 tropical storms, 11 typhoons, and 8 super typhoons. The season's peak months August and September saw minimal activity caused by an unusually strong and a persistent suppressing phase of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). The season ran throughout 2014, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season began with the development of Tropical Storm Lingling on January 18, and ended after Tropical Storm Jangmi which dissipated on January 1 of the next year.

2017 Pacific typhoon season typhoon season in the Pacific Ocean

The 2017 Pacific typhoon season was a below-average season in terms of Accumulated Cyclone Energy and the number of typhoons and super typhoons, and the first and latest since the 1977 season to not produce a Category 5-equivalent typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The season produced a total of 27 named storms, 11 typhoons, and only two super typhoons, making it an average season in terms of storm numbers. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2017, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Muifa, developed on April 25, while the season's last named storm, Tembin, dissipated on December 26. This season also featured the latest occurrence of the first typhoon of the year since 1998, with Noru reaching this intensity on July 23.

Tropical Depression Winnie Pacific tropical depression in 2004

Tropical Depression Winnie was a weak, but catastrophic tropical cyclone that killed nearly 1,600 people after triggering widespread flooding in the Philippines.

Tropical Storm Aere (2011) Pacific tropical storm in 2011

Tropical Storm Aere, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Bebeng, was a mild tropical storm that affected eastern Philippines and southern Japan. It was the first named storm of the 2011 Pacific typhoon season. Aere is the Marshallese word for storm.

Tropical Storm Washi Pacific severe tropical storm in 2011

Severe Tropical Storm Washi, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Sendong, was a late-season tropical cyclone that caused catastrophic damage in the Philippines in late 2011. Washi, which means Aquila in Japanese, made landfall over Mindanao, a major island in the Philippines, on December 16. Washi weakened slightly after passing Mindanao, but regained strength in the Sulu Sea, and made landfall again over Palawan on December 17.

Tropical Storm Lingling (2014)

Tropical Storm Lingling, known in the Philippines as Tropical Depression Agaton, was a weak but deadly tropical cyclone that affected the Philippines in January 2014. The first named storm of the annual typhoon season, this early-season cyclone remained very disorganized throughout its lifespan. Lingling was the first major natural disaster in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, as it caused widespread landslide incidents and floods in Mindanao, resulting in 70 deaths and damage amounting to over 566 million pesos on the island.

Typhoon Hagupit (2014)

Typhoon Hagupit, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ruby, was the second most intense tropical cyclone in 2014. Hagupit particularly impacted the Philippines in early December while gradually weakening, killing 18 people and causing $114 million in the country. Prior to making landfall, Typhoon Hagupit was considered the worst threat to the Philippines in 2014, but it was significantly smaller than 2013's Typhoon Haiyan.

Tropical Storm Jangmi (2014)

Tropical Storm Jangmi, known in the Philippines as Tropical Storm Seniang, was a weak but destructive tropical cyclone that impacted the Philippines during late December 2014. It produced heavy rainfall which caused serious flooding. Flooding in Philippines caused 66 deaths and at least $28.3 million damage.

Typhoon Koppu Pacific typhoon in 2015

Typhoon Koppu, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Lando, was a powerful and devastating tropical cyclone that struck Luzon in October 2015. It was the twenty-fourth named storm and the fifteenth typhoon of the annual typhoon season. Similar to Goni earlier in the year, Koppu originated from a tropical disturbance east of the Mariana Islands on October 10. Moving briskly west, the system consolidated into a tropical depression the following day and further into a tropical storm on October 13. Situated over the warm waters of the Philippine Sea, Koppu quickly deepened. The storm reached its peak intensity on October 17 with ten-minute sustained winds of 185 km/h (115 mph) according to the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center assessed Koppu to have been a Category 4-equivalent super typhoon with one-minute sustained winds of 240 km/h (150 mph). The storm subsequently made landfall at this strength near Casiguran, Philippines. Rapid weakening ensued due to interaction with the mountainous terrain of Luzon and the disheveled core of Koppu emerged over the West Philippine Sea on October 19. Unfavorable environmental conditions inhibited reorganization and the system diminished to a tropical depression on October 21.

Typhoon Melor Pacific typhoon in 2015

Typhoon Melor, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Nona, was a powerful tropical cyclone that struck the Philippines in December 2015. The twenty-seventh named storm and the eighteenth typhoon of the annual typhoon season, Melor killed 51 people and caused ₱7.04 billion in damage.

Typhoon Nock-ten Pacific typhoon in 2016

Typhoon Nock-ten, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Nina, was the strongest Christmas Day tropical cyclone worldwide in terms of 1-minute sustained winds. Forming as a tropical depression southeast of Yap and strengthening into the twenty-sixth tropical storm of the annual typhoon season on December 21, 2016, Nock-ten intensified into the thirteenth typhoon of the season on December 23. Soon afterwards, the system underwent explosive intensification and became a Category 5-equivalent super typhoon early on December 25. Nock-ten weakened shortly afterwards before making eight landfalls over the Philippines. The typhoon weakened rapidly due to the landfalls as it entered the South China Sea on December 26, turned southwest, and ultimately dissipated on December 28 due to the winter monsoon.

Tropical Depression Usman Pacific typhoon in 2018

Tropical Depression Usman was a weak but deadly tropical depression that impacted the Philippines in late December 2018. While passing over the Philippines, Usman brought heavy rain that caused several landslides, which killed 156 people, injured 105 more, and caused ₱5.41 billion in damages.

Tropical cyclones in 2012

Tropical cyclones in 2012 were spread out across seven different areas called basins; the strongest tropical cyclone was Typhoon Sanba strengthened to a minimum barometric pressure of 900 mbar before striking South Korea. 132 tropical cyclones had formed this year to date. 88 tropical cyclones had been named by either a Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) or a Tropical Cyclone Warning Center (TCWC). The most active basin in the year was the Western Pacific, which documented 25 named systems, while the North Atlantic Pacific, despite only amounting to 19 named systems, was its basin's hyperactive since 2010 becoming the third-most active season on record. Conversely, the Eastern Pacific hurricane season experienced the average number of cyclones reaching tropical storm intensity, numbering 17 respectively. The least tropical cyclone season was North Indian Ocean had a late start, with the first system forming in October. Activity across the southern hemisphere's three basins—South-West Indian, Australian, and South Pacific—was spread evenly, with each region recording seven named storms apiece.

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