List of retired Philippine typhoon names

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The Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) for tropical cyclone warnings PAGASA Philippine Area of Responsibility - en.svg
The Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) for tropical cyclone warnings

Since 1963 the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has assigned local names to a tropical cyclone should it move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N-25°N even if the cyclone has had an international name assigned to it. All three agencies that have assigned names to tropical cyclones within the Western Pacific have retired the names of significant tropical cyclones, with PAGASA retiring names if a cyclone has caused at least

Contents

Since 1963 the naming lists have been revised in 1979, 1985, 2001 and 2005 for various reasons including to help minimize confusion in the historical records and to remove the names that might have negative associations with real persons. [1] [2] Within this list all information with regards to intensity is taken from while the system was in the Philippine area of responsibility and is thus taken from PAGASA's archives, rather than the JTWC or JMA's archives.

Background

The practice of using names to identify tropical cyclones goes back several centuries, with systems named after places, saints or things they hit before the formal start of naming in the Western Pacific. [3] [4] These included the Kamikaze, 1906 Hong Kong typhoon, 1922 Swatow typhoon and the 1934 Muroto typhoon. [5]

Since 1963 the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has assigned local names to a tropical cyclone should it move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N-25°N even if the cyclone has had an international name assigned to it. All three agencies that have assigned names to tropical cyclones within the Western Pacific have retired the names of significant tropical cyclones, with PAGASA retiring names if a cyclone has caused at least

Since 1963 the naming lists have been revised in 1979, 1985, 2001 and 2005 for various reasons including to help minimize confusion in the historical records and to remove the names that might have negative associations with real persons.[1][2] Within this list all information with regards to intensity is taken from while the system was in the Philippine area of responsibility and is thus taken from PAGASA's archives, rather than the JTWC or JMA's archives.


The practice of retiring significant names was started during 1955 by the United States Weather Bureau in the Atlantic Ocean, after hurricanes Carol, Edna, and Hazel struck the Northeastern United States and caused a significant amount of damage in the previous year. [3] Initially the names were only designed to be retired for ten years after which they might be reintroduced, however, it was decided at the 1969 Interdepartmental hurricane conference, that any significant hurricane in the future would have its name permanently retired. [3] [6] Several names have been removed from the naming lists by PAGASA for various other reasons, than causing a significant amount of death/destruction, which include being pronounced in a very similar way to other names and political reasons. [7] [8]

PAGASA has removed names from the list for various other reasons, than causing a significant amount of death/destruction. These names include Nonoy in 2015 which sounded similar to Noynoy, which was President Benigno Aquino III's nickname. [9]

As of 2020, 62 tropical cyclone names have been retired by PAGASA, with the most recent being Ambo of this year.

Systems

NameDates activeCategorywind speedsPressureProvinces affectedDamage
(PHP)
DeathsMissingRefs
Dading (Winnie) June 26 - July 3, 1964Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)LuzonUnknown100 [10]
Welming (Emma) October 31 - November 8, 1967Super Typhoon260 km/h (160 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Visayas, Luzon30064 [10]
Pitang (Georgia) September 8 - 14, 1970Super Typhoon260 km/h (160 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Luzon9580 [10]
Sening (Joan) October 10 - 18, 1970Super Typhoon280 km/h (175 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Luzon, Visayas768193 [10]
Titang (Kate) October 14 – 25, 1970Super Typhoon240 km/h (150 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Mindanao, Visayas1,551284 [10]
Yoling (Patsy) November 14 – 22, 1970Super Typhoon260 km/h (155 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Luzon61181 [10] [11]
Wening (Elaine) October 23 - November 1, 1974Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Luzon23 [10]
Didang (Olga) May 10 – 28, 1976Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)940 hPa (27.76 inHg)Luzon374 [10] [11]
Atang (Olive) April 15 – 26, 1978Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)955 hPa (28.20 inHg)Visayas, Luzon111 [10] [12]
Kading (Rita) October 15–29, 1978Super Typhoon220 km/h (140 mph)880 hPa (25.99 inHg)Luzon444354
Nitang (Ike) August 26 – September 6, 1984Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Visayas, danao3,000 [10] [13] [14]
Undang (Agnes) October 30 – November 10, 1984Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Visayas, Luzon895275 [10] [13] [14]
Katring (Thelma) July 8 – 30, 1987Super Typhoon185 km/h (125 mph)890 hPa (26.28 inHg)Luzonunspecified8
Herming (Betty) August 16 – 30, 1987Super Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)890 hPa (26.28 inHg)Luzon, Visayas94 [10] [14] [15]
Sisang (Nina) November 16 – 30, 1987Super Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Luzon808 [10] [13] [16]
Unsang (Ruby) October 20 – 28, 1988Typhoon140 km/h (85  mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon157 [nb 1] [10] [14]
Yoning (Skip) November 3 – 12, 1988Typhoon150 km/h (90  mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Visayas, Luzon21795 [10] [11] [17]
Ruping (Mike) November 5 – 18, 1990Super Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Visayas748246 [10] [16] [18] [19]
Uring (Thelma) November 1 – 8, 1991Tropical Storm85 km/h (50 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Visayas5,9563,000 [10] [13] [16]
Monang (Lola) December 1 – 9, 1993Typhoon85 km/h (50 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Visayas2300
Rosing (Angela) October 25 – November 7, 1995Super Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)910 hPa (26.87 inHg)Luzon936 [10] [13] [18]
Iliang (Zeb) October 7 – 14, 1998Super Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Southern Luzon4629
Loleng (Babs) October 15 – 24, 1998Super Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)940 hPa (27.38 inHg)Visayas, Luzon30329 [nb 2] [21] [22]
Gloria (Chataan) June 27 — July 13, 2002Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Luzon18 [nb 3] [2] [23]
Harurot (Imbudo) July 19 — 23, 2003Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon64 [24] [25]
Unding (Muifa) November 14 — 21, 2004Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon6869 [26] [27]
Violeta (Merbok) November 22 — 23, 2004Tropical Storm65 km/h (40 mph)938 hPa (27.70 inHg)Luzon3117 [26] [27] [28]
Winnie November 27 — 30, 2004Tropical Depression55 km/h (35 mph)1,000 hPa (29.53 inHg)Luzon1,619713 [26] [27]
Milenyo (Xangsane) September 25 — 29, 2006Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)972 hPa (28.71 inHg)Luzon, Visayas11079 [nb 2] [29] [30] [31]
Reming (Durian) November 28 – December 2, 2006Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)938 hPa (27.70 inHg)Luzon, Visayas1,400762 [29] [32] [33] [34]
Cosme (Halong) May 15 — 19, 2008Severe tropical Storm110 km/h (70 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Luzon513 [nb 4]
Frank (Fengshen) June 18 — 23, 2008Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)958 hPa (28.29 inHg)Luzon, Visayas1,50187 [nb 2] [nb 5] [29] [36] [37]
Ondoy (Ketsana) September 24 — 27, 2009Typhoon130 km/h (80 mph)980 hPa (28.94 inHg)Luzon67137 [nb 2] [nb 4] [29] [38] [39]
Pepeng (Parma) September 30 – October 10, 2009Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)938 hPa (27.70 inHg)Visayas, Luzon46547 [nb 2] [nb 4] [29] [39] [40]
Juan (Megi) October 15 — 20, 2010Super Typhoon230 km/h (145 mph)885 hPa (26.13 inHg)Luzon264 [nb 4] [41] [42]
Bebeng (Aere) May 6 – 10, 2011Tropical Storm75 km/h (45 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Luzon, Visayas352 [nb 4] [43] [44]
Juaning (Nock-ten) July 24 – 28, 2011Severe tropical Storm95 km/h (60 mph)985 hPa (29.09 inHg)Visayas, Luzon770 [nb 4] [44] [45]
Mina (Nanmadol) August 21 – 29, 2011Super Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph){925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Luzon360 [nb 4] [44] [46]
Pedring (Nesat) September 24 – 28, 2011Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon850 [nb 4] [44] [47]
Sendong (Washi) December 14 – 18, 2011Severe Tropical Storm95 km/h (60 mph)992 hPa (29.29 inHg)Visayas, Mindanao2,546181 [nb 4] [48] [49]
Pablo (Bopha) December 2 – 9, 2012Super Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)930 hPa (27.46 inHg)Mindanao, Visayas, Luzon1,901844 [nb 4] [13] [50] [51]
Labuyo (Utor) August 9 – 13, 2013Super Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)925 hPa (27.32 inHg)Luzon113 [nb 6] [54] [55] [56]
Santi (Nari) October 8 – 13, 2013Typhoon140 km/h (85 mph)965 hPa (28.50 inHg)Luzon155 [nb 6] [57]
Yolanda (Haiyan) November 6 – 9, 2013Super Typhoon230 km/h (145 mph)895 hPa (26.43 inHg)Visayas, Mindoro, Palawan6,3001,081 [nb 6] [58] [59]
Glenda (Rammasun) July 13 – 17, 2014Super Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon1066 [nb 7] [60]
Jose (Halong) August 2–7, 2014Super Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)920 hPa (27.17 inHg)Luzon20 [nb 7] [60]
Mario (Fung-wong) September 17 – 21, 2014Tropical Storm85 km/h (50 mph)985 hPa (29.09 inHg)Luzon184 [nb 7] [60]
Ruby (Hagupit) December 3 – 10, 2014Super Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Visayas, Luzon180 [nb 7] [60] [62]
Seniang (Jangmi) December 28–31, 2014Tropical Storm75 km/h (45 mph)996 hPa (29.41 inHg)Visayas, Mindanao666 [nb 7] [60]
Lando (Koppu) October 14 – 22, 2015Super Typhoon185 km/h (115 mph)920 hPa (27.17 inHg)Luzon4883 [63]
Nona (Melor) December 9 – 17, 2015Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon, Eastern Visayas424 [64] [65]
Karen (Sarika) October 11 – 16, 2016Typhoon175 km/h (110 mph)935 hPa (27.61 inHg)Luzon00 [66]
Lawin (Haima) October 16 – 21, 2016Super Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Luzon140 [67]
Nina (Nock-ten) December 22 – 28, 2016Super Typhoon195 km/h (120 mph)915 hPa (27.02 inHg)Luzon1321 [68]
Urduja (Kai-tak) December 11 – 19, 2017Tropical Storm75 km/h (45 mph)996 hPa (29.41 inHg)Visayas111 [nb 8] [70]
Vinta (Tembin) December 20 – 24, 2017Typhoon130 km/h (80 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Visayas, Mindanao4414 [71]
Ompong (Mangkhut) September 12 – 15, 2018Super Typhoon205 km/h (125 mph)905 hPa (26.72 inHg)Luzon792 [nb 9] [73]
Rosita (Yutu) October 27 – 31, 2018Super Typhoon215 km/h (130 mph)900 hPa (26.58 inHg)Luzon200 [nb 9] [74]
Usman December 25 – 29, 2018Tropical depression55 km/h (35 mph)1000 hPa (29.53 inHg)Visayas, Luzon281 [nb 9] [75]
Tisoy (Kammuri) November 24 – December 6, 2019Typhoon165 km/h (105 mph)950 hPa (28.05 inHg)Luzon, Visayas120 [nb 10] [77]
Ursula (Phanfone) December 23 – December 29, 2019Typhoon150 km/h (90 mph)970 hPa (28.64 inHg)Luzon, Visayas5055 [78] [79] [80]
Ambo (Vongfong) May 11 – 17, 2020Typhoon155 km/h (100 mph)965 hPa (28.50 inHg)Luzon, Visayas42 [81]

See also

Notes

  1. The death and missing columns exclude deaths caused by Typhoon Ruby (Unsang), in the MV Doña Marilyn disaster.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Reference for the names Frank, Loleng, Milenyo, Pepeng, and Ondoy being retired. [20]
  3. Retired in 2005 due to President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo's involvement in the Hello Garci scandal.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Reference for the names Cosme, Ondoy, Pepeng, Juan, Bebeng, Juaning, Mina, Pedring, Sendong, Pablo being retired. [35]
  5. The death and missing columns includes deaths caused by Typhoon Fengshen (Frank), in the MV Princess of the Stars disaster.
  6. 1 2 3 Reference for the names Santi, Labuyo and Yolanda being retired. [52] [53]
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 References for the names Glenda, Jose, Mario, Ruby and Seniang being retired. [60] [61]
  8. Reference for the name Urduja being retired. [69]
  9. 1 2 3 Reference for the names Ompong, Rosita and Usman being retired. [72]
  10. Reference for the name Tisoy being retired. [76]

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