Mammary intercourse

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An illustration of mammary intercourse Wiki-mam-intcs.png
An illustration of mammary intercourse

Mammary intercourse is a sex act, performed as either foreplay or as non-penetrative sex, that involves the stimulation of a man's penis by a woman's breasts and vice versa. [1] It involves placing the penis between a woman's breasts and moving the penis up and down to simulate sexual penetration and to create sexual pleasure. It may be used as an alternative to a handjob.

Contents

Practice

Mammary intercourse involves a man kneeling or sitting on a woman's stomach or chest and placing his erect penis between her breasts, and rubbing or thrusting it there, while the breasts are squeezed around the penile shaft, by either the woman or the man, creating tightness similar to masturbation, [1] and in simulation of penetrative sex. To create a smooth motion, a lubricant, masturbation cream, or saliva may be spread between the breasts or on the penis. In one variant, the woman can tighten her breasts around the penis and move them up and down to bring the man to orgasm. Alternative positions are for the man standing while the woman kneels, or the man laying back with the woman on top.

In some cases, the mammary intercourse can be combined with oral sex by the woman who, through fellatio, can bring the man to orgasm. Mammary intercourse may be carried out face to face or head to tail.

Mammary intercourse is mostly suited for women with naturally larger breasts, while it is recommended that woman with smaller breasts be on top. [2] Smaller female breasts, however, tend to be more sensitive than larger ones. [3] It has been said[ by whom? ] that breast implants are not flexible enough to sustain mammary intercourse.

The woman does not receive direct sexual stimulation during mammary intercourse, other than the erotic stimulation of bringing her sexual partner to orgasm, without sexual penetration. However, Alex Comfort has said that mammary intercourse can produce orgasm in women with sensitive breasts (what Margot Anand terms local orgasms of the breast), and it was one of the nine substitute exercises for penetrative sexual activities, as detailed in the Paradis Charnels of 1903. [4] [5]

Since mammary intercourse is a non-penetrative sex act, the risk of passing a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that requires direct contact between the mucous membranes and pre-ejaculate or semen is greatly reduced. HIV is among the infections that require such direct contact and is therefore very unlikely to be transmitted via mammary intercourse. [6] A study of the condom usage habits of New Zealand's sex workers said that they offered various safe sex alternatives to vaginal sex to clients who refused to wear a condom. One sex worker said that mammary intercourse was one alternative used; mammary intercourse performed by a woman with large breasts felt to the client like penetrative vaginal sex. [7]

Depictions of the practice, at least in advertising, have been described as pornographic or erotic. [8] Mammary intercourse has sometimes been considered a perversion. [9] Freud, however, considered such extensions of sexual interest to fall within the range of the normal, unless marked out by exclusivity (i.e. the repudiation of all other forms of sexual contact). [10]

Slang terms

When performed as a non-penetrative sex act, the act is continued until the man ejaculates. At that time, the sperm typically covers the intermammary sulcus or part of the breast. It may also reach the woman's face, resulting in a facial. When it covers the woman's neck, it may be called a "pearl necklace".

Slang terms for mammary intercourse include:

See also

Related Research Articles

Anal sex Insertion of the penis into the anus, or other sexual activity involving the anus

Anal sex or anal intercourse is generally the insertion and thrusting of the erect penis into a person's anus, or anus and rectum, for sexual pleasure. Other forms of anal sex include fingering, the use of sex toys for anal penetration, oral sex performed on the anus (anilingus), and pegging. Although anal sex most commonly means penile–anal penetration, sources sometimes use anal intercourse to exclusively denote penile–anal penetration, and anal sex to denote any form of anal sexual activity, especially between pairings as opposed to anal masturbation.

Fellatio Oral sex on the penis by a sexual partner

Fellatio is an oral sex act involving a person stimulating the penis of another person by using the mouth, throat, or both. Oral stimulation of the scrotum may also be termed fellatio, or colloquially as teabagging. If fellatio is performed on oneself, the act is called autofellatio.

Orgasm is the sudden discharge of accumulated sexual excitement during the sexual response cycle, resulting in rhythmic muscular contractions in the pelvic region characterized by sexual pleasure. Experienced by males and females, orgasms are controlled by the involuntary or autonomic nervous system. They are usually associated with involuntary actions, including muscular spasms in multiple areas of the body, a general euphoric sensation and, frequently, body movements and vocalizations. The period after orgasm is typically a relaxing experience, attributed to the release of the neurohormones oxytocin and prolactin as well as endorphins.

Sexual intercourse Copulation for reproduction or sexual pleasure, or other penetrative sex acts for sexual pleasure.

Sexual intercourse is sexual activity typically involving the insertion and thrusting of the penis into the vagina for sexual pleasure, reproduction, or both. This is also known as vaginal intercourse or vaginal sex. Other forms of penetrative sexual intercourse include anal sex, oral sex, fingering, and penetration by use of a dildo. These activities involve physical intimacy between two or more individuals and are usually used among humans solely for physical or emotional pleasure and can contribute to human bonding.

Sex toy Sexual device

A sex toy is an object or device that is primarily used to facilitate human sexual pleasure, such as a dildo or vibrator. Many popular sex toys are designed to resemble human genitals, and may be vibrating or non-vibrating. The term sex toy can also include BDSM apparatus and sex furniture such as slings; however, it is not applied to items such as birth control, pornography, or condoms. Alternative expressions include adult toy and the dated euphemism marital aid, although "marital aid" has a broader sense and is applied to drugs and herbs marketed to supposedly enhance or prolong sex. Sex toys are most commonly sold at a sex shop, but they may also be sold in a pharmacy/chemist store, a pornographic DVD store, a head shop, or a department store. Today's sex toys are available in almost all countries for male and females.

A sex position is a position of the body that people use for sexual intercourse or other sexual activities. Sexual acts are generally described by the positions the participants adopt in order to perform those acts. Though sexual intercourse generally involves penetration of the body of one person by another, sex positions commonly involve penetrative or non-penetrative sexual activities.

Missionary position

The missionary position or man-on-top position is a sex position in which, generally, a woman lies on her back and a man lies on top of her while they face each other and engage in vaginal intercourse. The position may also be used for other sexual activity, such as anal sex. It is commonly associated with heterosexual sexual activity, but is also used by same-sex couples.

Frot Penis-to-penis sexual contact

Frot is a non-penetrative form of male-to-male sexual activity that usually involves direct penis-to-penis contact. The term was popularized by gay male activists who disparaged the practice of anal sex, but has since evolved to encompass a variety of preferences for the act, which may or may not imply particular attitudes towards other sexual activities. Owing to its non-penetrative character, frot has the safe sex advantage of minimizing the transmission risk for HIV/AIDS; however, it still carries the risk of skin-to-skin sexually transmitted infections, such as HPV and pubic lice (crabs), both of which can be transmitted even when lesions are not visible.

Human sexual response cycle

The human sexual response cycle is a four-stage model of physiological responses to sexual stimulation, which, in order of their occurrence, are the excitement-, plateau-, orgasmic-, and resolution phases. This physiological response model was first formulated by William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson, in their 1966 book Human Sexual Response. Since then, other human sexual response models have been formulated.

Edging, peaking, or surfing is a sexual technique whereby orgasm is controlled. It is practiced alone or with a partner and involves the maintenance of a high level of sexual arousal for an extended period without reaching climax.

Oral sex Sexual activity involving the stimulation of the genitalia by the use of the mouth

Oral sex, sometimes referred to as oral intercourse, is sexual activity involving the stimulation of the genitalia of a person by another person using the mouth and the throat. Cunnilingus is oral sex performed on the vulva or vagina, while fellatio is oral sex performed on the penis. Anilingus, another form of oral sex, is oral stimulation of the anus. Oral stimulation of other parts of the body, such as by kissing or licking, is not considered oral sex.

Fingering (sexual act) The use of fingers to sexually stimulate

Fingering is typically the use of fingers or hands to sexually stimulate the vulva or vagina. Vaginal fingering is legally and medically called digital penetration or digital penetration of the vagina. Fingering may also include the use of fingers to sexually stimulate the anus.

Delayed ejaculation describes a man's inability or persistent difficulty in achieving orgasm, despite typical sexual desire and sexual stimulation. Generally, a man can reach orgasm within a few minutes of active thrusting during sexual intercourse, whereas a man with delayed ejaculation either does not have orgasms at all or cannot have an orgasm until after prolonged intercourse which might last for 30–45 minutes or more. In most cases, delayed ejaculation presents the condition in which the man can climax and ejaculate only during masturbation, but not during sexual intercourse. It is the least common of the male sexual dysfunctions, and can result as a side effect of some medications. In one survey, 8% of men reported being unable to achieve orgasm over a two-month period or longer in the previous year.

Non-penetrative sex Sexual activity that usually does not include sexual penetration

Non-penetrative sex or outercourse is sexual activity that usually does not include sexual penetration. It generally excludes the penetrative aspects of vaginal, anal, or oral sexual activity, but includes various forms of sexual and non-sexual activity, such as frottage, mutual masturbation, kissing, or cuddling. Some forms of non-penetrative sex, particularly when termed outercourse, include penetrative aspects, such as penetration that may result from forms of fingering or oral sex.

Masturbation Sexual stimulation of ones own genitals

Masturbation is the sexual stimulation of one's own genitals for sexual arousal or other sexual pleasure, usually to the point of orgasm. The stimulation may involve hands, fingers, everyday objects, sex toys such as vibrators, or combinations of these. Mutual masturbation is masturbation with a sexual partner, and may include manual stimulation of a partner's genitals, or be used as a form of non-penetrative sex.

Lesbian sexual practices Sexual practices between women

Lesbian sexual practices are sexual activities involving women who have sex with women, regardless of their sexual orientation. A woman who has sex with another woman may identify as a lesbian if she is sexually attracted to women, or bisexual if she is not exclusively sexually attracted to women, or dispense with sexual identification altogether. The term may also be applied to a heterosexual or asexual woman who is unsure of or is exploring her sexuality.

Human female sexuality encompasses a broad range of behaviors and processes, including female sexual identity and sexual behavior, the physiological, psychological, social, cultural, political, and spiritual or religious aspects of sexual activity. Various aspects and dimensions of female sexuality, as a part of human sexuality, have also been addressed by principles of ethics, morality, and theology. In almost any historical era and culture, the arts, including literary and visual arts, as well as popular culture, present a substantial portion of a given society's views on human sexuality, which include both implicit (covert) and explicit (overt) aspects and manifestations of feminine sexuality and behavior.

Handjob

A handjob is a sex act, performed as either foreplay or as non-penetrative sex, that involves the manual stimulation of a man's penis or scrotum by another person to induce an erection for sexual pleasure, sexual arousal and sometimes resulting in orgasm and ejaculation.

Cunnilingus Oral sex on the vulva or vagina by a sexual partner

Cunnilingus is an oral sex act performed by a person on the vulva or vagina of another person. The clitoris is the most sexually sensitive part of the human female genitalia, and its stimulation may result in a woman becoming sexually aroused or achieving orgasm.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to human sexuality:

References

  1. 1 2 Alex Comfort, The Joy of Sex (1972) p. 67-9
  2. Alex Comfort, The Joy of Sex (1972) p. 69
  3. Levin, Roy J. "The breast/nipple/areola complex and human sexuality". Sexual & Relationship Therapy. Vol.21, Issue 2 (May 2006). p.237–249
  4. Alex Comfort, The Joy of Sex (1972) pp. 69, 175 and 176
  5. Margo Ananad, The Art of Sexual Ecstasy (1990) p. 309
  6. Kelly, Jeffrey A. (October 1995). "Advances in HIV/AIDS education and prevention". Family Relations. 44 (4): 345–352. doi:10.2307/584989. ISSN   0197-6664. JSTOR   584989.
  7. Woods, 1996, in Davis, pages 125-127
  8. Citation O'Barr, W. M. (2011). "Sex and Advertising". Advertising & Society Review. 12 (2): 2. doi:10.1353/asr.2011.0019. S2CID   154834026.
  9. Clifford Allen, A Textbook of Psychosexual Disorders (1969) p. 200
  10. Sigmund Freud, On Sexuality (PFL 7) p. 65 and p. 75
  11. Godson, page 96.
  12. M. S. Morton, The Lover's Tongue (2003) p. 187

Further reading