Massachusetts's congressional districts

Last updated
The Commonwealth's districts since 2013 Massachusetts congressional districts large.pdf
The Commonwealth's districts since 2013

Massachusetts is currently divided into 9 congressional districts, each represented by a member of the United States House of Representatives. After the 2010 census, the number of Massachusetts's seats was decreased from 10 to 9 due to the State's low growth in population since the year 2000. This mandatory redistricting after the 2010 census eliminated Massachusetts's 10th congressional district, and also caused a major shift in how the state's congressional districts are currently drawn.

Contents

Current districts and representatives

List of members of the Massachusettsan United States House delegation, their terms, their district boundaries, and the districts' political rating according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 9 members, all of whom are members of the Democratic party.

DistrictRepresentativeParty CPVI IncumbencyDistrict map
1st Richard Neal official photo (cropped).jpg Richard Neal (D-Springfield)DemocraticD+10January 3, 1989 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Jim McGovern, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg Jim McGovern (D-Worcester)DemocraticD+10January 3, 1997 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Lori Trahan, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg Lori Trahan (D-Westford)DemocraticD+12January 3, 2019 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Jake Auchincloss, 117th Congress portrait.jpg Jake Auchincloss (D-Newton)DemocraticD+13January 3, 2021 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Katherine Clark, official portrait, 116th Congress (cropped).jpg Katherine Clark (D-Melrose)DemocraticD+23December 12, 2013 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th Seth Moulton (cropped).jpg Seth Moulton (D-Salem)DemocraticD+10January 3, 2015 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Rep. Ayanna Pressley, 117th Congress.jpg Ayanna Pressley (D-Boston)DemocraticD+35January 3, 2019 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
8th Stephen Lynch 2019.jpg Stephen Lynch (D-Boston)DemocraticD+14October 16, 2001 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
9th William Keating 112th Congress Portrait.jpg Bill Keating (D-Bourne)DemocraticD+6January 3, 2011 – present Massachusetts US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif

After the 1890 Census and starting with the Fifty-third United States Congress in 1893, Massachusetts Congressional Districts were numbered west to east: with the first district in the west (Berkshire County) and the highest numbered district at Cape Cod.

Before then, the district numeration was not as consistent; sometimes running east to west, other times going counter-clockwise around Boston.

History of apportionment

Census
Year
Resident
Population [nb 1]
Number of
Representatives [nb 2]
Constituents
per Representative
(Massachusetts)
Constituents
per Representative
(nationally)
1789No Census8N/AN/A
1790 378,7871427,05630,000
1800 422,8451724,87333,000
1810 472,0402023,60235,000
1820 523,2871340,25340,000
1830 610,4081250,86747,700
1840 737,6991073,77070,680
1850 994,5141190,41093,425
1860 1,231,06610123,107127,381
1870 1,457,35111132,486131,425
1880 1,783,08512148,590151,912
1890 2,238,94713172,227173,901
1900 2,805,34614200,381194,182
1910 3,366,41616210,401212,407
1920 3,852,35616N/AN/A
1930 4,249,61415283,307280,675
1940 4,316,72114308,337301,164
1950 4,690,51414335,037344,587
1960 5,148,57812429,048410,481
1970 5,689,17012477,223469,088
1980 5,737,09311521,549519,235
1990 6,016,42510602,905572,466
2000 6,349,09710635,557646,952
2010 6,547,6299 [2] [3] 728,849710,767

Source: U.S. Census Bureau.

Historical and present district boundaries

Table of United States congressional district boundary maps in the State of Massachusetts, presented chronologically. [4] All redistricting events that took place in Massachusetts between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

YearStatewide mapBoston highlight
1973–1982 United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts, 1973 - 1982.tif United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts (metro highlight), 1973 - 1982.tif
1983–1992 United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts, 1983 - 1992.tif United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts (metro highlight), 1983 - 1992.tif
1993–2002 United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts, 1993 - 2002.tif United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts (metro highlight), 1993 - 2002.tif
2003–2013 United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts, 2003 - 2013.tif United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts (metro highlight), 2003 - 2013.tif
Since 2013 United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts, since 2013.tif United States Congressional Districts in Massachusetts (metro highlight), since 2013.tif

See also

Notes

  1. The resident population excludes the overseas population.
  2. Congressional apportionment for each state is based upon (1) the resident population and (2) the overseas U.S. military and federal civilian employees (and their dependents living with them) allocated to their home state, as reported by the employing federal agencies.

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Massachusetts's 1st congressional district is a United States congressional district located in the western and central part of Massachusetts. The state's largest congressional district in area, it covers about one-third of the state and is more rural than the rest. It has the state's highest point, Mount Greylock; the district includes the cities of Springfield, West Springfield, Pittsfield, Holyoke, Agawam, Chicopee and Westfield.

Massachusettss 2nd congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

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Massachusettss 3rd congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district is located in northeastern and central Massachusetts.

Massachusettss 4th congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district is located mostly in southern Massachusetts. It is represented by Democrat Jake Auchincloss. Jake Auchincloss won this seat in the 2020 election.

Massachusettss 9th congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

Massachusetts's 9th congressional district is located in eastern Massachusetts. It is represented by Democrat William R. Keating. The 9th district is the least Democratic Congressional District in Massachusetts according to the PVI.

Massachusettss 5th congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

Massachusetts's 5th congressional district is a congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. The district is represented by Katherine Clark. Massachusetts congressional redistricting after the 2010 census has changed the borders of the district starting with the elections of 2012, with the new 3rd district largely taking the place of the old 5th. The 5th district covers many of the communities represented in the old 7th district. As of 2010, the population of the 5th congressional district was 727,515. On July 15, 2013, Ed Markey resigned from the seat to become the junior Senator from Massachusetts. On December 10, 2013, Democrat Katherine Clark won a special election to fill the seat for the remainder of the 113th Congress. She was sworn into office on December 12, 2013 and serves as the Assistant Speaker of the United States House of Representatives for the 117th Congress.

Massachusettss 8th congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district is located in eastern Massachusetts, including part of Boston. It is represented by Democrat Stephen Lynch. For one congressional term (1791–1793) it served as the home district of the District of Maine. The district boundaries were significantly changed as of the elections of 2012 due to redistricting after the 2010 census, with the old 8th district largely being shifted to the new 7th district. The new 8th district comprises many of the communities of the old 9th district, as well as some easternmost Norfolk County communities and northernmost Plymouth County communities of the old 10th district.

Massachusettss 11th congressional district

Massachusetts's 11th congressional district is an obsolete congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. It was eliminated in 1993 after the 1990 U.S. Census. Its last Congressman was Brian Donnelly; its most notable were John Quincy Adams following his term as president, eventual president John F. Kennedy and Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill.

Massachusettss 7th congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district is a congressional district located in eastern Massachusetts, including roughly three-fourths of the city of Boston and a few of its northern and southern suburbs. Massachusetts congressional redistricting after the 2010 census changed the borders of the district starting with the elections of 2012, with most of the old 7th district redistricted to the new 5th district. Most of the old 8th district now comprises the new 7th district. The seat is currently held by Ayanna Pressley.

Massachusettss 10th congressional district

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Massachusettss 6th congressional district U.S. House district for Massachusetts

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Massachusettss 14th congressional district

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Massachusettss 12th congressional district

Massachusetts's 12th congressional district is an obsolete district. It was eliminated in 1983 after the 1980 U.S. Census. Its last location was in southeastern Massachusetts and its last Congressman was Gerry Studds, who was redistricted into the tenth district.

Massachusettss 13th congressional district

Massachusetts's 13th congressional district is an obsolete district. It was also for a short time in the early 19th century a Massachusetts District of Maine. It was eliminated in 1963 after the 1960 U.S. Census. Its last location was in eastern Massachusetts. Its last Congressman was James A. Burke, who was redistricted into the eleventh district.

Massachusettss 16th congressional district

Massachusetts's sixteenth congressional district is an obsolete district. It was also for a short time in the early 19th century a Massachusetts District of Maine. It was eliminated in 1933 after the 1930 Census. Its last location was in eastern Massachusetts at Cape Cod. Its last Congressman was Charles L. Gifford, who was redistricted into the fifteenth district.

Massachusettss 15th congressional district

Massachusetts's fifteenth congressional district is an obsolete district. It was also for a short time in the early 19th century a Massachusetts District of Maine. It was eliminated in 1943 after the 1940 Census. Its last location was in eastern Massachusetts at Cape Cod. Its last Congressman was Charles L. Gifford, who was redistricted into the ninth district.

The Official Congressional Directory is the official directory of the United States Congress, prepared by the Joint Committee on Printing (JCP) and published by the United States Government Printing Office (GPO) since 1887. Directories since the 104th Congress (1995–1997) are available online from the Government Publishing Office. Per federal statute the Directory is published and distributed during the first session of each new Congress. It is a designated essential title distributed to Federal depository libraries and the current edition is available for purchase from GPO.

References

  1. "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  2. "Deval Patrick Signs New Massachusetts Map", Roll Call , Washington, DC, November 21, 2011
  3. "Massachusetts Redistricting Analysis". Daily Kos . November 14, 2011. Retrieved November 27, 2013.
  4. "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789–2012" . Retrieved October 18, 2014.

Further reading

19th century

20th century

21st century