Sky blue

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Sky blue
 
Shades of light blue.png
Heraldic tincture Bleu celeste
Common connotations
boys, daylight, water, air, paleness
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #87CEEB
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(135, 206, 235)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(43, 12, 0, 8)
HSV     (h, s, v)(197°, 43%, 92%)
Source X11 color names
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Sky blue is the name of a colour that resembles the colour of the sky at noon. The entry for "sky-blue" in Murray's New English Dictionary (1919) reports a first sighting of the term in the article on "silver" in Ephraim Chambers's Cyclopaedia of 1728. However, many writers had used the term "sky blue" to name a colour before Chambers. For example, we find "sky blue" in A Collection of Voyages and Travels (London: Awnsham and John Churchill, 1704), vol. 2, p. 322, where John Nieuhoff describes certain flowers: "they are of a lovely sky blue colour, and yellow in the middle". The sense of this colour may have been first used in 1585 in a book by Nicolas de Nicolay where he stated "the tulbant of the merchant must be skie coloured". [1]

<i>Oxford English Dictionary</i> premier British dictionary of the English language

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world. The second edition, comprising 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, was published in 1989.

Ephraim Chambers English writer and encyclopaedist

Ephraim Chambers was an English writer and encyclopaedist, who is primarily known for producing the Cyclopaedia, or a Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences.

<i>Cyclopædia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences</i> UK 1728 encyclopedia

Cyclopædia: or, An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences was an encyclopedia published by Ephraim Chambers in London in 1728, and reprinted in numerous editions in the eighteenth century. The Cyclopaedia was one of the first general encyclopedias to be produced in English. The 1728 subtitle gives a summary of the aims of the author:

Contents

Displayed at right is the web colour sky blue.

Variations

Celeste

Celeste
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #B2FFFF
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(178, 255, 255)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(30, 0, 0, 0)
HSV     (h, s, v)(180°, 30%, 100%)
SourceS.Fantetti e C.Petracchi (2001).
Il dizionario dei colori:
nomi e valori in quadricromia
.
Zanichelli. ISBN   8808079953.
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Celeste (Spanish:  [sᵻˈlɛste] , (Italian:  [tʃeˈlɛste] , English: /sɪˈlɛst/ ) is the colloquial name for the pale turquoise blue colour associated with Italian bicycle manufacturer Bianchi S.p.A and sometimes known as Bianchi Green. In Italian, as the name indicates (Celestial), it is an attempt to reproduce the colour of clear skies. In English, this colour may also be referred to as Italian sky blue. The Japanese equivalent is known as sora iro or mizudori, referring to the color of the sky or its reflection on the sea. [2]

Turquoise is a blue/green color, based on the gem of the same name. The word turquoise comes from the French for "Turkish", as the gem was originally imported from Turkey. The first recorded use of turquoise as a color name in English was in 1573.

Blue A primary colour between purple and green

Blue is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory, as well as in the RGB colour model. It lies between violet and green on the spectrum of visible light. The eye perceives blue when observing light with a dominant wavelength between approximately 450 and 495 nanometres. Most blues contain a slight mixture of other colors; azure contains some green, while ultramarine contains some violet. The clear daytime sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. An optical effect called Tyndall scattering explains blue eyes. Distant objects appear more blue because of another optical effect called aerial perspective.

Bicycle pedal-driven two-wheel vehicle

A bicycle, also called a cycle or bike, is a human-powered or motor-powered, pedal-driven, single-track vehicle, having two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other. A bicycle rider is called a cyclist, or bicyclist.

Bleu celeste ("sky blue") is a rarely occurring tincture in heraldry (not being one of the seven main colours or metals or the three "staynard colours"). This tincture is sometimes also called ciel or simply celeste. It is depicted in a lighter shade than the range of shades of the more traditional tincture azure, which is the standard blue used in heraldry. [3]

Bleu celeste tincture

Bleu celeste is a rarely occurring and non-standard tincture in heraldry. This tincture is sometimes also called ciel or simply celeste. It is depicted in a lighter shade than the range of shades of the more traditional tincture azure, which is the standard blue used in heraldry.

Tincture (heraldry) colour used to emblazon a coat of arms in heraldy

Tinctures constitute the limited palette of colours and patterns used in heraldry. The need to define, depict, and correctly blazon the various tinctures is one of the most important aspects of heraldic art and design.

Heraldry profession, study, or art of creating, granting, and blazoning arms and ruling on questions of rank or protocol

Heraldry is a broad term, encompassing the design, display, and study of armorial bearings, as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology, together with the study of ceremony, rank, and pedigree. Armory, the best-known branch of heraldry, concerns the design and transmission of the heraldic achievement, more commonly known as the coat of arms. The coat of arms usually includes a shield, helmet, and crest, together with any accompanying devices, such as supporters, badges, heraldic banners, and mottoes.

Gradations

The Italian Wikipedia cites Il dizionario dei colori: nomi e valori in quadricromia by S.Fantetti and C.Petracchi and describes multiple variants of Celeste as shown below, plus details as defined in the infobox above. [4]

colournameCMYKRGBHEX
 celeste (sky blue, heavenly blue)030000000000178255255B2FFFF
 celeste polvere (dusty)010000000000230255255E6FFFF
 celeste pallido (pale)016000003000204255255CCFFFF
 celeste velato (veiled / overcast)020010010000204230230CCE6E6
 celeste opaco (opaque)05002002000012820420480CCCC

Bianchi bicycles

Bianchi bicycles are traditionally painted celeste, also known as Bianchi Green (and sometimes, incorrectly Tiffany Blue). Contradictory myths say celeste is the colour of the Milan sky; the eye colour of a former queen for whom Edoardo Bianchi made a bicycle; and that it was a mixture of surplus military paint.

Tiffany Blue is the colloquial name for the light medium robin egg blue color associated with Tiffany & Co., the New York City jewelry company, created by Charles Tiffany and John Young in 1837. It is similar to the color teal visually, but it is different. The color was used on the cover of Tiffany's Blue Book, first published in 1845. Since then, Tiffany & Co. has used the color extensively on promotional materials like boxes and bags.

Milan Italian city

Milan is a city in northern Italy, capital of Lombardy, and the second-most populous city in Italy after Rome, with the city proper having a population of 1,372,810 while its metropolitan area has a population of 3,243,115. Its continuously built-up urban area has a population estimated to be about 5,270,000 over 1,891 square kilometres. The wider Milan metropolitan area, known as Greater Milan, is a polycentric metropolitan region that extends over central Lombardy and eastern Piedmont and which counts an estimated total population of 7.5 million, making it by far the largest metropolitan area in Italy and the 54th largest in the world. Milan served as capital of the Western Roman Empire from 286 to 402 and the Duchy of Milan during the medieval period and early modern age.

Edoardo Bianchi was an Italian entrepreneur and inventor who founded the bicycle manufacturing company Bianchi in 1885 and the Italian automobile manufacturer Autobianchi.

The exact shade of turquoise used by the company has varied over time, but has always been described as Celeste. [5] In Anglophone countries Celeste is sometimes reported as Pantone -#332 (Seafoam green [6] ) (or #333), and with various other shades.

Pantone LLC is a U.S. corporation headquartered in Carlstadt, New Jersey. The company is best known for its Pantone Matching System (PMS), a proprietary color space used in a variety of industries, primarily printing, though sometimes in the manufacture of colored paint, fabric, and plastics.

Light sky blue

Light sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #87CEFA
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(135, 206, 250)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(46, 18, 0, 2)
HSV     (h, s, v)(203°, 46%, 98%)
Source X11 color names
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the web colour light sky blue. It is close in shade to baby blue.

Medium sky blue

Medium sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #80DAEB
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(128, 218, 235)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(46, 7, 0, 8)
HSV     (h, s, v)(190°, 46%, 92 [7] %)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the colour medium sky blue. This is the colour that is called sky blue in Crayola crayons. This colour was formulated by Crayola in 1958.

"Sky blue" appears in the 32, 48, 64, 96 and 120 packs of crayons.

Vivid sky blue

Vivid sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #00CCFF
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(0, 204, 255)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(100, 20, 0, 0)
HSV     (h, s, v)(192°, 100%, 100 [8] %)
Source Crayola C.P.
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the colour vivid sky blue.

Deep sky blue

Deep sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #00BFFF
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(0, 191, 255)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(100, 25, 0, 0)
HSV     (h, s, v)(195°, 100%, 100%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Deep sky blue is an azure-cyan colour associated with deep sky blue.

Deep sky blue is a web colour.

This colour is the colour on the colour wheel (RGB/HSV colour wheel) halfway between azure and cyan.

The traditional name for this colour is Capri . [9]

The first use of Capri as a colour name in English was in 1920. [10]

The colour Capri in general is named for the azure-cyan colour of the Mediterranean sea around the island of Capri off Italy, the site of several villas belonging to the Roman Emperor Tiberius, including his Imperial residence in his later years, the Villa Jovis . Specifically, the colour Capri is named after the colour of the Blue Grotto on the island of Capri. [11] as it appears on a bright sunny day. Today the island of Capri is a resort island popular with tourists.

The colour name deep sky blue for this colour did not come into use until the promulgation of the X11 colour list in 1987.

The name Capri is still used for this colour as well as the name deep sky blue.

French sky blue

French sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #77B5FE
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(119, 181, 254)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(53, 29, 0, 0)
HSV     (h, s, v)(212°, 53%, 100 [12] %)
Source Pourpre.com
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the colour French sky blue, which is the tone of sky blue that is called sky blue (bleu ciel) in the Pourpre.com colour list, a colour list widely popular in France.

Spanish sky blue

Spanish sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #00AAE4
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(0, 178, 228)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(85, 5, 0, 0)
HSV     (h, s, v)(195°, 100%, 89%)
SourceGallego and Sanz [13]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Spanish sky blue is the colour that is called celeste (the Spanish word for "sky blue") in the Guía de coloraciones (Guide to colourations) by Rosa Gallego and Juan Carlos Sanz, a colour dictionary published in 2005 that is widely popular in the Hispanophone realm.

Dark sky blue

Dark sky blue
 
Gtk-dialog-info.svg    Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #8CBED6
sRGB B  (r,  g,  b)(140, 190, 214)
CMYK H  (c, m, y, k)(35, 11, 0, 16)
HSV     (h, s, v)(199°, 35%, 84 [14] %)
Source Pantone TPX [15]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the colour dark sky blue.

This is the colour called sky blue in Pantone.

The source of this colour is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" colour list, color #14-4318 TPX—Sky Blue. [16]

In culture

Sports

See also

Related Research Articles

Fuchsia (color) color

Fuchsia is a vivid purplish red color, named after the color of the flower of the fuchsia plant, which took its name from the 16th century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs.

Lemon or lemon-color is a pale yellow color, the color of the lemon fruit.

Puce is a dark red or purple brown color, a brownish purple or a "dark reddish brown."

Orchid (color) color

Orchid is a bright rich purple color that is a representation of the color of the flower of some members of the plant family orchidaceae.

Viridian is a blue-green pigment, a hydrated chromium(III) oxide, of medium saturation and relatively dark in value. It is composed more of green than blue. Specifically, it is a dark shade of spring green, so it is the color between green and teal on the color wheel, or, in paint, a tertiary blue–green color. Viridian takes its name from the Latin viridis, meaning "green". The first recorded use of viridian as a color name in English was in the 1860s.

Red-violet color

Red-violet is a rich color of high medium saturation about 3/4 of the way between red and magenta, closer to magenta than to red. It is classified in color theory as one of the purple colors—a non-spectral color between red and violet that is a deep version of a color on the line of purples on the CIE chromaticity diagram. Both its saturation and brightness falling short of 100%, red-violet is not a pure chroma. There is a color of similar hue that, however, comes close to being a pure chroma: process magenta. The pure chroma color composed of equal parts of magenta and red is called rose.

Carmine (color) color

Carmine is the general term for some deep red colours that are very slightly purplish but are generally slightly closer to red than the colour crimson is. Some rubies are coloured the colour shown below as rich carmine. The deep dark red color shown at right as carmine is the colour of the raw unprocessed pigment, but lighter, richer, or brighter colours are produced when the raw pigment is processed, some of which are shown below.

Baby blue is a pale tint of azure, one of the pastel colors.

Sapphire (color) saturated blue color

Sapphire is a saturated shade of blue, referring to the gem of the same name. Sapphire gems are most commonly found in a range of blue shades although they can be many different colors. Other names for variations of the color sapphire are blue sapphire or sapphire blue, shown below.

Shades of orange

In optics, orange has a wavelength between approximately 585 and 620 nm and a hue of 30° in HSV color space. In the RGB color space it is a secondary color numerically halfway between gamma-compressed red and yellow, as can be seen in the RGB color wheel. The complementary color of orange is azure. Orange pigments are largely in the ochre or cadmium families, and absorb mostly blue light.

Spring bud is the color that used to be called spring green before the X11 web color spring green was formulated in 1987 when the X11 colors were first promulgated. This color is now called spring bud to avoid confusion with the web color.

Air Force blue Shades of the colour azure

Air Force blue colours are a variety of colours that are mostly various tones of the colour azure, the purest tones of which are identified as being the colour of the sky on a clear day.

Shades of red colors that are variations of red

Varieties of the color red may differ in hue, chroma or lightness, or in two or three of these qualities. Variations in value are also called tints and shades, a tint being a red or other hue mixed with white, a shade being mixed with black. A large selection of these various colors is shown below.

Shades of pink

This article is about notable tints and shades of the color pink. These various colors are shown below.

Shades of magenta

This article is about notable tints and shades of the color magenta. These various colors are shown below.

Shades of yellow

Varieties of the color yellow may differ in hue, chroma or lightness, or in two or three of these qualities. Variations in value are also called tints and shades, a tint being a yellow or other hue mixed with white, a shade being mixed with black. A large selection of these various colors is shown below.

Shades of blue variety of the color blue

Varieties of the color blue may differ in hue, chroma, or lightness, or in two or three of these qualities. Variations in value are also called tints and shades, a tint being a blue or other hue mixed with white, a shade being mixed with black. A large selection of these various colors is shown below.

Shades of cyan

This article is about notable tints and shades of the color cyan, a greenish blue. Cyan is one of the subtractive primary colors- cyan, magenta, and yellow.

Shades of violet

There are numerous variations of the color violet, a sampling of which are shown below.

Shades of azure

Azure is a variation of blue that is often described as the color of the sky on a clear day.

References

  1. Cited as 1585 in Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 204; Color Sample of Sky Blue: Page 89 Plate 33 Color Sample E6; the quote is from the English translation of Nicolay's Navigations, peregrinations...faicts en la Turcquie (1577).
  2. Japanese colours
  3. Scott-Giles, C. W. (1958). Boutell's Heraldry (rev. ed.). London & New York: Frederick Warne & Co.
  4. S.Fantetti e C.Petracchi (2001). Il dizionario dei colori: nomi e valori in quadricromia. Zanichelli. ISBN   8808079953.
  5. Design Classics, Cycling Plus, UK, December 2000
  6. Sea Foam Green
  7. web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #80DAEB (Medium Sky Blue):
  8. web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #00CCFF (Vivid Sky Blue):
  9. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Color Sample of Capri: Page 93 Plate 35 Color Sample L7; The color Capri is shown as lying halfway between Cyan and Azure.
  10. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 191
  11. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 152 Discussion of the color Capri
  12. web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #77B5FE (French Sky Blue):
  13. Gallego, Rosa; Sanz, Juan Carlos (2005). Guía de coloraciones (Gallego, Rosa; Sanz, Juan Carlos (2005). Guide to Colorations) Madrid: H. Blume. ISBN   84-89840-31-8
  14. web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of colour #8CBED6 (Dark Sky Blue):
  15. Type the words "Sky Blue" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the colour will appear.
  16. Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder--Type the words "Sky Blue" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the colour will appear: