Deaths in March 2003

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February March April

The following is a list of notable deaths in March 2003.

Contents

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

March 2003

1

Elaine Barrie American actress

Elaine Barrie was an American actress who appeared in several films and one Broadway play. She was the fourth, and last, wife of actor John Barrymore.

<i>Midnight</i> (1939 film) 1939 film by Mitchell Leisen

Midnight is a 1939 American screwball comedy film directed by Mitchell Leisen and starring Claudette Colbert, Don Ameche, John Barrymore, Francis Lederer, Mary Astor, and Elaine Barrie. Written by Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder based on a story by Edwin Justus Mayer and Franz Schulz, the film is about an unemployed American showgirl stranded in Paris who is set up by a millionaire to break up his wife's affair with another man. In 2013, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

John Barrymore American actor

John Barrymore was an American actor on stage, screen and radio. A member of the Drew and Barrymore theatrical families, he initially tried to avoid the stage, and briefly attempted a career as an artist, but appeared on stage together with his father Maurice in 1900, and then his sister Ethel the following year. He began his career in 1903 and first gained attention as a stage actor in light comedy, then high drama, culminating in productions of Justice (1916), Richard III (1920) and Hamlet (1922); his portrayal of Hamlet led to him being called the "greatest living American tragedian".

2

Roger Albertsen was a Norwegian football midfielder.

Hank Ballard was a rhythm and blues singer and songwriter, the lead vocalist of The Midnighters and one of the first rock and roll artists to emerge in the early 1950s. He played an integral part in the development of the genre, releasing the hit singles "Work With Me, Annie" and answer songs "Annie Had a Baby" and "Annie's Aunt Fannie" with his Midnighters. He later wrote and originally recorded "The Twist" which was notably covered a year later by Chubby Checker, this second version spreading the popularity of the dance. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.

The Midnighters were an American R&B group from Detroit, Michigan. They were an influential group in the 1950s and early 1960s, with many R&B hit records. They were also notable for launching the career of lead singer Hank Ballard and the worldwide dance craze the Twist. Between 1953 and 1962 the Midnighters had almost two dozen hits on the U.S. Pop & R&B charts. Their big hits included the million-selling Billboard Top 10 pop hits "Finger Poppin' Time", and "Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go". The Midnighters also had 13 Top 10 R&B hits, including three that reached number 1. Their Top 10 R&B hits included "Work with Me, Annie", "It's Love Baby ", "Annie Had a Baby", "The Hoochi Coochi Coo", "Teardrops on Your Letter", "Get It", "The Float" and "Nothing but Good". They received the Rhythm and Blues Foundation's prestigious Pioneer Award in 1992 and were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1999. The Midnighters are also noted for achieving a music industry milestone in 1960, by becoming the first group in history to place 3 singles in the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time. The group's lead singer, Hank Ballard, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. The Midnighters as a group were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on April 14, 2012.

3

Gilbert Wheeler Beebe American epidemiologist and statistician

Gilbert Wheeler Beebe, also known as Gil Beebe, was an American epidemiologist and statistician known for monumental studies of radiation-related mortality and morbidity among populations exposed to ionizing radiation from the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and the Chernobyl reactor accident in 1986.

Ionizing radiation Radiation that carries enough light energy to liberate electrons from atoms or molecules

Ionizing radiation is radiation that carries sufficient energy to detach electrons from atoms or molecules, thereby ionizing them. Ionizing radiation is made up of energetic subatomic particles, ions or atoms moving at high speeds, and electromagnetic waves on the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Ann A. Bernatitus wartime nurse

Ann Agnes Bernatitus was a United States Navy nurse who served during World War II. She was the first American recipient of the Legion of Merit

4

Fedora Barbieri was an Italian mezzo-soprano.

A mezzo-soprano or mezzo (, ; Italian pronunciation: [ˈmɛddzo soˈpraːno] meaning "half soprano") is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range lies between the soprano and the contralto voice types. The mezzo-soprano's vocal range usually extends from the A below middle C to the A two octaves above (i.e. A3–A5 in scientific pitch notation, where middle C = C4; 220–880 Hz). In the lower and upper extremes, some mezzo-sopranos may extend down to the F below middle C (F3, 175 Hz) and as high as "high C" (C6, 1047 Hz). The mezzo-soprano voice type is generally divided into the coloratura, lyric, and dramatic mezzo-soprano.

Sébastien Japrisot was a French author, screenwriter and film director, born in Marseille. His pseudonym was an anagram of Jean-Baptiste Rossi, his real name. Japrisot has been nicknamed "the Graham Greene of France".

5

Séamus de Brún was an Irish teacher, senator and promoter of the Irish language and culture.

John Sanford or John B. Sanford, born Julian Lawrence Shapiro, was an American screenwriter and author who wrote 24 books. The Cambridge Companion to Jewish American Literature describes him as, "Perhaps the most outstanding neglected novelist." A one-time member of the Communist Party, after he and his wife Marguerite Roberts refused to testify to the House Un-American Activities Committee, they were blacklisted and unable to work in Hollywood for nearly a decade.

Pete Taylor was a radio and television sportscaster who worked for radio station KRNT and television station KCCI in Des Moines, Iowa. Taylor also served as the play-by-play announcer for Iowa State University football and men's basketball.

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Related Research Articles

The following is a list of notable people who died in January 2005.

The following is a list of notable deaths in April 2004.

The following is a list of notable deaths in June 2004.

The following is a list of notable deaths in December 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in October 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in September 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in June 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in May 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in February 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in January 2003.

The following is a list of notable deaths in December 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in November 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in June 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in May 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in April 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in March 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in February 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in January 2002.

The following is a list of notable deaths in April 2001.

The following is a list of notable deaths in January 2001.

References

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